Macrofungi

Covers mushrooms and other non-lichenized fungi that form multicellular fruiting bodies large enough to be seen with the unaided eye.

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Common names beginning with B:
Baeos (Psilocybe baeocystis)
Conifer-cone Baeospora (Baeospora myosura)
Substrate: Spruce and Douglas fir cones
Spores: (3--4.5 x 2--3 µm) weakly amyloid spores
Lavender Baeospora (Baeospora myriadophylla)
Substrate: Hardwood logs and stumps
Carbon balls (Daldinia grandis)
Tippler's bane (Coprinopsis atramentaria)
Distribution: Broad
Habitat: Occurs widely in many natural and disturbed habitats, including gardens and other urban settings
Swamp beacon (Mitrula elegans)
Habitat: Occurs on very wet plant litter or even on litter submerged in cold, shallow, running water.
Bear's-head (Hericium abietis)
Distribution: Common in PNW
Habitat: It grows on conifer logs, especially those of fir and hemlock.
Bog bell (Galerina paludosa)
Funeral bell (Galerina marginata)
Habitat: It occurs on stumps and logs of conifers and hardwoods, or grows from pieces of buried wood, wood chips, or other woody debris.
Hairy leg bell (Galerina vittiformis)
Brown birch-bolete (Leccinum scabrum)
Habitat: Common in urban and suburban settings and less so in natural habitats. Occurs with birch.
Fluted bird's-nest (Cyathus striatus)
Habitat: It can be common in gardens where woody materials have been added to the planting beds.
Substrate: Cyathus striatus occurs in a number of different habitats on decaying plant materials such as wood chips, small branches, and needles.
Splash-cup bird's-nest (Cyathus stercoreus)
Streaked bird's-nest (Cyathus striatus)
Habitat: It can be common in gardens where woody materials have been added to the planting beds.
Substrate: Cyathus striatus occurs in a number of different habitats on decaying plant materials such as wood chips, small branches, and needles.
Jellylike black urn (Plectania melastoma)
Black-foot (Polyporus elegans)
Black-leg (Polyporus badius)
Blewit (Lepista nuda)
Wood blewit (Lepista nuda)
Stuntz's blue-legs (Psilocybe stuntzii)
Distribution: It is not often found in natural habitats. It is another species apparently confined to the Pacific Coast, particularly the PNW.
Habitat: P. stuntzii occurs frequently in well mulched newly planted lawns, as well as in wood chips and other landscape settings.
Blue-ringers (Psilocybe stuntzii)
Distribution: It is not often found in natural habitats. It is another species apparently confined to the Pacific Coast, particularly the PNW.
Habitat: P. stuntzii occurs frequently in well mulched newly planted lawns, as well as in wood chips and other landscape settings.
Blusher (Amanita novinupta)
Grey Bolbitius (Bolbitius aleuriatus)
Admirable bolete (Boletellus mirabilis)
Aspen bolete (Leccinum insigne)
Habitat: Associated with aspen
Birch bolete (Leccinum scabrum)
Habitat: Common in urban and suburban settings and less so in natural habitats. Occurs with birch.
Bitter beech bolete (Boletus calopus)
Bitter bolete (Boletus calopus)
Bitter bolete (Boletus rubripes)
Distribution: Widespread but not particularly common in the PNW region.
Habitat: It was described from coastal conifer and mixed forests in California, but in the PNW, occurs in montane conifer forests.
Bogus bolete (Gastroboletus turbinatus)
Description: The genus Gastroboletus is used for secotioid fungi that are similar to species of Boletus. Usually a cap is present and typically it is rounded or flattened with the margin turned down. However, in G. ruber (Zeller) Cázares & Trappe (= Truncocolumella rubra Zeller), the cap is so reduced that it looks like a false truffle without a complete peridium. In most Gastroboletus species the tubes are elongated, curved or contorted, and often olive to brown. The stipe is usually short and stout or sometimes forms a columella. G. turbinatus is our most common species, occurring from spring through fall. At first glance, the fruitbody looks like a bolete, such as Boletus chrysenteron---the cap is velvety and brown with yellowish and reddish areas, the stipe is rather short, pointed below, yellowish with small reddish scales and granules, and the pores are rather large, reddish and stain blue. The tubes are long, curved, yellow to greenish yellow and clearly indicate its secotioid nature. The flesh is yellowish, with some red just below the cap cuticle, and the whole interior stains blue after cutting.
Distribution: Broad
Boring brown bolete (Boletus subtomentosus)
Bragger's bolete (Boletellus mirabilis)
Chestnut bolete (Gyroporus castaneus)
Cracked-cap bolete (Boletus chrysenteron)
Distribution: Common in conifer forests.
Habitat: B. chrysenteron can be found in forested areas, on the edges of woods, and in urban habitats, such as parks.
Dark bolete (Porphyrellus porphyrosporus)
Distribution: Widespread but not abundant.
Habitat: P. porphyrosporus occurs in coastal and low elevation conifer forests.
Dusky bolete (Porphyrellus porphyrosporus)
Distribution: Widespread but not abundant.
Habitat: P. porphyrosporus occurs in coastal and low elevation conifer forests.
Elegant bolete (Suillus grevillei)
Habitat: Associated with larch.
Gastroid bolete (Gastroboletus turbinatus)
Description: The genus Gastroboletus is used for secotioid fungi that are similar to species of Boletus. Usually a cap is present and typically it is rounded or flattened with the margin turned down. However, in G. ruber (Zeller) Cázares & Trappe (= Truncocolumella rubra Zeller), the cap is so reduced that it looks like a false truffle without a complete peridium. In most Gastroboletus species the tubes are elongated, curved or contorted, and often olive to brown. The stipe is usually short and stout or sometimes forms a columella. G. turbinatus is our most common species, occurring from spring through fall. At first glance, the fruitbody looks like a bolete, such as Boletus chrysenteron---the cap is velvety and brown with yellowish and reddish areas, the stipe is rather short, pointed below, yellowish with small reddish scales and granules, and the pores are rather large, reddish and stain blue. The tubes are long, curved, yellow to greenish yellow and clearly indicate its secotioid nature. The flesh is yellowish, with some red just below the cap cuticle, and the whole interior stains blue after cutting.
Distribution: Broad
Gilled bolete (Phylloporus rhodoxanthus)
Granulated bolete (Suillus granulatus)
Grayish larch bolete (Suillus viscidus)
Habitat: Associated with larch.
Heavy bolete (Suillus ponderosus)
Hollow bolete (Suillus cavipes)
Habitat: associated with larch when it occurs in the PNW.
Hollow-stalked larch bolete (Suillus cavipes)
Habitat: associated with larch when it occurs in the PNW.
Jellied bolete (Suillus umbonatus)
Distribution: It is broadly distributed in the Northern Hemisphere.
Habitat: It is rather abundant at times in lodgepole pine forests in late summer and early fall, and in shore pine woodlands in fall, sometimes growing in clusters and lining the edges of moist depressions.
King bolete (Boletus edulis)
Habitat: Occurs with conifers.
Lake's bolete (Suillus lakei)
Habitat: Occurs under Douglas fir.
Larch bolete (Suillus grevillei)
Habitat: Associated with larch.
Madrone bolete (Leccinum manzanitae)
Manzanita bolete (Leccinum manzanitae)
Milk bolete (Suillus granulatus)
Northern pine bolete (Suillus albivelatus)
Habitat: S. albivelatus occurs in mixed conifer forests and appears to be associated with pines.
Orange-capped bolete (Leccinum aurantiacum)
Pepper bolete (Chalciporus piperatus)
Distribution: It is widespread and can be rather common in some years, but usually is not abundant.
Peppery bolete (Chalciporus piperatus)
Distribution: It is widespread and can be rather common in some years, but usually is not abundant.
Queen bolete (Boletus regineus)
Red-cracked bolete (Boletus chrysenteron)
Distribution: Common in conifer forests.
Habitat: B. chrysenteron can be found in forested areas, on the edges of woods, and in urban habitats, such as parks.
Red-cracking bolete (Boletus chrysenteron)
Distribution: Common in conifer forests.
Habitat: B. chrysenteron can be found in forested areas, on the edges of woods, and in urban habitats, such as parks.
Red-pored bolete (Boletus pulcherrimus)
Red-stalked bolete (Boletus luridiformis)
Red-stemmed bitter bolete (Boletus rubripes)
Distribution: Widespread but not particularly common in the PNW region.
Habitat: It was described from coastal conifer and mixed forests in California, but in the PNW, occurs in montane conifer forests.
Rosy bolete (Suillus ochraceoroseus)
Habitat: Occurs with larch in higher and interior conifer forests, mostly in late spring and summer.
Rosy larch bolete (Suillus ochraceoroseus)
Habitat: Occurs with larch in higher and interior conifer forests, mostly in late spring and summer.
Ruby bolete (Boletus rubellus)
Habitat: Grassy areas, mossy lawns, or along the edges of trails, always near trees such as oaks, cottonwood, willow, and basswood or linden.
Scarletina bolete (Boletus luridiformis)
Short-stemmed bolete (Suillus brevipes)
Habitat: It occurs primarily with two-needle pines during late summer and fall
Slender red-pored bolete (Boletus luridiformis)
Spring king bolete (Boletus rex-veris)
Suede bolete (Boletus subtomentosus)
Weeping bolete (Suillus granulatus)
Western painted bolete (Suillus lakei)
Habitat: Occurs under Douglas fir.
White king bolete (Boletus barrowsii)
Distribution: Southwest United States
Habitat: Under ponderosa pines
Woolly pine bolete (Suillus tomentosus)
Distribution: Very common and abundant in the PNW.
Habitat: S. tomentosus occurs primarily under lodgepole and shore pines.
Yellow-cracked bolete (Boletus subtomentosus)
Zeller's bolete (Boletus zelleri)
Distribution: Common in coastal and low elevation conifer forests.
Habitat: Occurs in urban areas, parks, along trails, and in other areas where conifers occur.
Alice Eastwood's Boletus (Boletus eastwoodiae)
Conifer Boletus (Boletus coniferarum)
Habitat: Low- to mid-elevation conifer forests
Smith's Boletus (Boletus smithii)
Viscid Boletus (Aureoboletus flaviporus)
Yellow-fleshed Boletus (Boletus chrysenteron)
Distribution: Common in conifer forests.
Habitat: B. chrysenteron can be found in forested areas, on the edges of woods, and in urban habitats, such as parks.
Blackedge bonnet (Mycena pelianthina)
Bleeding bonnet (Mycena sanguinolenta)
Bulbous bonnet (Mycena stylobates)
Burgundydrop bonnet (Mycena haematopus)
Substrate: The fruitbodies grow in groups, often in loose clusters, on both hardwood and conifer logs and can get quite large (for a mycena).
Spores: spores are broadly ellipsoid, 7--12 x 4--7 µm
Coldfoot bonnet (Mycena amicta)
Spores: ellipsoid spores (6--10 x 3.5--5.5 µm)
Common bonnet (Mycena galericulata)
Cryptic bonnet (Mycena picta)
Dripping bonnet (Roridomyces roridus)
Fairy bonnet (Coprinellus disseminatus)
Frosty bonnet (Mycena adscendens)
Golden edge bonnet (Mycena aurantiomarginata)
Distribution: Conifer forest along the Pacific Coast Known to be from Europe as well
Spores: ellipsoid, 7--9 x 4--5 µm, smooth and amyloid, and the cheilocystidia are club-shaped with numerous short projections, somewhat like a mace
Iodine bonnet (Mycena filopes)
Lilac bonnet (Mycena pura)
Mealy bonnet (Mycena cinerella)
Milking bonnet (Mycena galopus)
Nitrous bonnet (Mycena leptocephala)
Orange bonnet (Mycena acicula)
Pink bonnet (Mycena rosella)
Pinkedge bonnet (Mycena capillaripes)
Purple edge bonnet (Mycena purpureofusca)
Rooting bonnet (Mycena megaspora)
Sideshoot bonnet (Mycena latifolia)
Snapping bonnet (Mycena vitilis)
Golden bootleg (Phaeolepiota aurea)
Distribution: Widely distributed
Habitat: Usually found in the north temperate zone in disturbed areas of forests, such as along roadsides.
Pink bottom (Agaricus campestris)
Distribution: Worldwide
Habitat: Found in fields or pastures, especially those rich in manure
Dingy bowlcap (Lepista tarda)
Earth box (Geopyxis carbonaria)
Habitat: Occurs after conifer forest fires
Spores: The spores are smooth, ellipsoid, 11--18 x 6--9 µm, and do not contain prominent oil drops.
Alder bracket (Mensularia radiata)
Artist's bracket (Ganoderma applanatum)
Aspen bracket (Phellinus tremulae)
Big smoky bracket (Bjerkandera fumosa)
Bitter bracket (Oligoporus stipticus)
Blushing bracket (Daedaleopsis confragosa)
Brownflesh bracket (Coriolopsis gallica)
Cinnamon bracket (Hapalopilus nidulans)
Clustered bracket (Inonotus cuticularis)
Conifer blueing bracket (Oligoporus caesius)
Cushion bracket (Phellinus pomaceus)
Gilled bracket (Lenzites betulina)
Hairy bracket (Trametes hirsuta)
Habitat: Hardwood logs or woody substrates
Hazel bracket (Skeletocutis nivea)
Lacquered bracket (Ganoderma lucidum)
Lumpy bracket (Trametes gibbosa)
Purplepore bracket (Trichaptum abietinum)
Red-belted bracket (Fomitopsis pinicola)
Habitat: Occurs on conifers and hardwoods.
Smoky bracket (Bjerkandera adusta)
Tinder bracket (Fomes fomentarius)
Willow bracket (Phellinus igniarius)
Red tree brain (Peniophora rufa)
Yellow brain (Tremella mesenterica)
Blackening brittlegill (Russula nigricans)
Distribution: Broad Widespread in Northern Hemisphere
Bloody brittlegill (Russula sanguinaria)
Copper brittlegill (Russula decolorans)
Crab brittlegill (Russula xerampelina)
Distribution: Broad
Habitat: Variety of forest types
Crowded brittlegill (Russula densifolia)
Fragile brittlegill (Russula fragilis)
Distribution: Broad
Habitat: Near or well-rotted wood
Fruity brittlegill (Russula queletii)
Greasy green brittlegill (Russula heterophylla)
Green brittlegill (Russula aeruginea)
Lilac brittlegill (Russula lilacea)
Olive brittlegill (Russula olivacea)
Pelargonium brittlegill (Russula pelargonia)
Powdery brittlegill (Russula parazurea)
Stinking brittlegill (Russula foetens)
Tardy brittlegill (Russula cessans)
Winecork brittlegill (Russula adusta)
Distribution: Western
Habitat: Conifer forests
Chestnut brittlestem (Psathyrella spadicea)
Common stump brittlestem (Psathyrella piluliformis)
Distribution: It is common throughout the U.S., including the PNW
Medusa brittlestem (Psathyrella caput-medusae)
Pale brittlestem (Psathyrella candolleana)
Habitat: It is found around stumps or in grassy areas in the vicinity of buried roots of hardwood trees.
Spring brittlestem (Psathyrella spadiceogrisea)
Blueleg brownie (Psilocybe cyanescens)
Mountain brownie (Psilocybe montana)
Distribution: Has been reported from much of the temperate Northern Hemisphere.
Habitat: Common at higher elevations
Olive brownie (Hypholoma myosotis)
Sphagnum brownie (Hypholoma elongatum)
Brunnea (Ramaria testaceoflava)
Penny bun (Boletus edulis)
Habitat: Occurs with conifers.
Black witch's butter (Exidia glandulosa)
Witch's butter (Exidia glandulosa)
Witch's butter (Tremella mesenterica)
Butter-cap (Rhodocollybia butyracea)
Habitat: Conifer forests
Spores: pale pinkish buff, relatively large (mostly 7-9 x 3.5-4 µm) and tear-shaped, almond-shaped, or ellipsoid