Macrofungi

Covers mushrooms and other non-lichenized fungi that form multicellular fruiting bodies large enough to be seen with the unaided eye.

Browse by common name:
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z
Common names beginning with C:
Ballen's American Caesar (Amanita calyptroderma)
King Alfred's cakes (Daldinia grandis)
Pink Calocybe (Calocybe carnea)
Candy-cap (Lactarius rubidus)
Hypoxylon canker (Entoleuca mammata)
American slippery cap (Suillus americanus)
Conifercone cap (Baeospora myosura)
Substrate: Spruce and Douglas fir cones
Spores: (3--4.5 x 2--3 µm) weakly amyloid spores
Crumble cap (Coprinellus disseminatus)
Cucumber cap (Macrocystidia cucumis)
Distribution: Usually found in nutrient-rich soils among herbaceous plants in gardens and parks rather than in forests (although it can occur there, usually along trailsides).
Slippery cap (Leotia lubrica)
Carbon-antlers (Xylaria hypoxylon)
Habitat: Occurs on rotting wood.
Imperial cat (Catathelasma imperiale)
Swollen-stalked cat (Catathelasma ventricosum)
Distribution: Catathelasmas usually occur on calcareous soils in conifer forests, often in large local populations, forming arcs or rings of fruitbodies.
Wood cauliflower (Sparassis crispa)
Distribution: It occurs in northern North America, Europe, and Asia.
Spores: The spores are white and may be produced on both surfaces of the leaf-like branches.
Common cavalier (Melanoleuca melaleuca)
Golden cavalier (Tricholoma aurantium)
Irksome cavalier (Tricholoma inamoenum)
Distribution: Widely distributed in the Northern Hemisphere
Habitat: Under conifers
Spring cavalier (Melanoleuca cognata)
Spores: large spores (7.5--10 x 4.5--6.5 µm)
Waxygill cavalier (Tricholoma myomyces)
Cep (Boletus edulis)
Habitat: Occurs with conifers.
Champignon (Agaricus bisporus)
Champignon (Agaricus campestris)
Distribution: Worldwide
Habitat: Found in fields or pastures, especially those rich in manure
Fairy ring champignon (Marasmius oreades)
Distribution: The most common species in the PNW, M. oreades, occurs in many parts of the world in lawns, parks, pastures, and other grassy areas, where it often grows in arcs or circles known as fairy rings.
Black chanterelle (Craterellus cornucopioides)
Black chanterelle (Polyozellus multiplex)
Distribution: Relatively uncommon Western North America, Japan and Korea
Habitat: Old-growth conifer forests
Blue chanterelle (Polyozellus multiplex)
Distribution: Relatively uncommon Western North America, Japan and Korea
Habitat: Old-growth conifer forests
Blue clustered chanterelle (Polyozellus multiplex)
Distribution: Relatively uncommon Western North America, Japan and Korea
Habitat: Old-growth conifer forests
Clustered blue chanterelle (Polyozellus multiplex)
Distribution: Relatively uncommon Western North America, Japan and Korea
Habitat: Old-growth conifer forests
False chanterelle (Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca)
Funnel chanterelle (Craterellus tubaeformis)
Distribution: Western West Coast
Habitat: Moist forest
Substrate: Mossy rotten wood
Golden chanterelle (Cantharellus formosus)
Description: The species epithet formosus means “finely formed” or “beautiful” and this certainly is descriptive of many of our golden chanterelles. The fruitbodies are often large for a chanterelle, and have a dull orange to brownish orange cap that readily bruises brownish and often is finely scaly. The fertile ridges often are deep and relatively thin; they are usually pale orange-yellow but may have a pinkish cast. The stipe usually is fairly slender and tapered downward.
Distribution: Broad Abundant through moist portions
Habitat: Moist ground
Pacific chanterelle (Cantharellus formosus)
Description: The species epithet formosus means “finely formed” or “beautiful” and this certainly is descriptive of many of our golden chanterelles. The fruitbodies are often large for a chanterelle, and have a dull orange to brownish orange cap that readily bruises brownish and often is finely scaly. The fertile ridges often are deep and relatively thin; they are usually pale orange-yellow but may have a pinkish cast. The stipe usually is fairly slender and tapered downward.
Distribution: Broad Abundant through moist portions
Habitat: Moist ground
Pacific golden chanterelle (Cantharellus formosus)
Description: The species epithet formosus means “finely formed” or “beautiful” and this certainly is descriptive of many of our golden chanterelles. The fruitbodies are often large for a chanterelle, and have a dull orange to brownish orange cap that readily bruises brownish and often is finely scaly. The fertile ridges often are deep and relatively thin; they are usually pale orange-yellow but may have a pinkish cast. The stipe usually is fairly slender and tapered downward.
Distribution: Broad Abundant through moist portions
Habitat: Moist ground
Rainbow chanterelle (Cantharellus roseocanus)
Distribution: Western Moist, coastal or mountain environments
Habitat: It seems to be associated primarily with spruce, occurring with Sitka spruce and shore pine near the coast and with Engelmann spruce in the mountains.
Scaly chanterelle (Gomphus floccosus)
Distribution: Broad Common in Western and North America
Habitat: Conifer Forests
Scaly vase chanterelle (Gomphus floccosus)
Distribution: Broad Common in Western and North America
Habitat: Conifer Forests
Trumpet chanterelle (Craterellus tubaeformis)
Distribution: Western West Coast
Habitat: Moist forest
Substrate: Mossy rotten wood
White chanterelle (Cantharellus subalbidus)
Distribution: Western Forests containing Douglas-fir and hemlock
Habitat: Favor old-growth forests
Winter chanterelle (Craterellus tubaeformis)
Distribution: Western West Coast
Habitat: Moist forest
Substrate: Mossy rotten wood
Wooly chanterelle (Gomphus floccosus)
Distribution: Broad Common in Western and North America
Habitat: Conifer Forests
Yellow chanterelle (Cantharellus formosus)
Description: The species epithet formosus means “finely formed” or “beautiful” and this certainly is descriptive of many of our golden chanterelles. The fruitbodies are often large for a chanterelle, and have a dull orange to brownish orange cap that readily bruises brownish and often is finely scaly. The fertile ridges often are deep and relatively thin; they are usually pale orange-yellow but may have a pinkish cast. The stipe usually is fairly slender and tapered downward.
Distribution: Broad Abundant through moist portions
Habitat: Moist ground
Western chevalier (Tricholoma intermedium)
Chicken-of-the-woods (Laetiporus conifericola)
Habitat: living trees, logs, stumps, snags, and even utility poles.
Ling chih (Ganoderma lucidum)
Golden-gilled Chrysomphalina (Chrysomphalina chrysophylla)
Anise-scented Clitocybe (Clitocybe odora)
Brick-red Clitocybe (Clitocybe sinopica)
Distribution: Any time of year, often on bare soil
Cloudy Clitocybe (Clitocybe nebularis)
Distribution: A variety of forests, often appearing along woodland trails late in fall
Club-footed Clitocybe (Ampulloclitocybe clavipes)
Crowded white Clitocybe (Clitocybe dilatata)
Funnel Clitocybe (Clitocybe gibba)
Large white Clitocybe (Clitocybe maxima)
Lead-white Clitocybe (Clitocybe cerussata)
Parasitic Clitocybe (Clitocybe sclerotoidea)
Small scaly Clitocybe (Clitocybe squamulosa)
Distribution: Broad Widespread, often common, and variable species
Smoky-brown Clitocybe (Ampulloclitocybe avellaneoalba)
Snowmelt Clitocybe (Clitocybe albirhiza)
Distribution: Western snowbank mushrooms
Sweat-producing Clitocybe (Clitocybe rivulosa)
White-stranded Clitocybe (Clitocybe albirhiza)
Distribution: Western snowbank mushrooms
Wood Clitocybe (Pseudoarmillariella ectypoides)
Black and white Clitocybula (Clitocybula atrialba)
Habitat: C. atrialba is a western species that occurs singly on the (sometimes buried) wood of alder and perhaps other hardwoods.
Substrate: Wood or woody debris
Spores: whitish amyloid spores
Handsome club (Clavulinopsis laeticolor)
Distribution: A widespread species, occurring across North America and in Europe and parts of Asia.
Pointed club (Clavaria acuta)
Habitat: Clavaria acuta usually occurs on bare soil in somewhat disturbed areas.
Water club (Vibrissea truncorum)
Habitat: Can be found on rotting pieces of wood that are very wet or submerged in cold water.
Club-foot (Ampulloclitocybe clavipes)
Queen's coat (Tricholomopsis decora)
Yellow cobweb (Xenasmatella vaga)
Fall coccora (Amanita calyptroderma)
Aniseed cockleshell (Lentinellus cochleatus)
Appleseed coincap (Collybia tuberosa)
Branched Collybia (Dendrocollybia racemosa)
Buttery Collybia (Rhodocollybia butyracea)
Habitat: Conifer forests
Spores: pale pinkish buff, relatively large (mostly 7-9 x 3.5-4 µm) and tear-shaped, almond-shaped, or ellipsoid
Clustered Collybia (Gymnopus acervatus)
Habitat: Conifer forests
Substrate: Rotting logs and stumps, other woody debris
Common Collybia (Gymnopus dryophilus)
Spores: whitish to pale yellow, smooth, and do not react in Melzer’s reagent
Fragrant Collybia (Rhodocollybia oregonensis)
Oak Collybia (Gymnopus dryophilus)
Spores: whitish to pale yellow, smooth, and do not react in Melzer’s reagent
Spotted Collybia (Rhodocollybia maculata)
Substrate: Clusters on or near rotting conifer wood
Tuberous Collybia (Collybia tuberosa)
Tufted Collybia (Gymnopus confluens)
Distribution: Mixed woods with heavy litter accumulations
Golden jelly cone (Heterotextus alpinus)
Habitat: Wet conifer
Common cone-head (Conocybe tenera)
Conifer conecap (Baeospora myosura)
Substrate: Spruce and Douglas fir cones
Spores: (3--4.5 x 2--3 µm) weakly amyloid spores
Artist's conk (Ganoderma applanatum)
Birch conk (Piptoporus betulinus)
False tinder conk (Phellinus igniarius)
Oak conk (Fuscoporia gilva)
Quinine conk (Fomitopsis officinalis)
Red-belt conk (Fomitopsis pinicola)
Habitat: Occurs on conifers and hardwoods.
Toothed conk (Echinodontium tinctorium)
Varnished conk (Ganoderma lucidum)
Western varnished conk (Ganoderma oregonense)
Habitat: Occurs on conifers and hardwoods.
Gastroid Coprinus (Montagnea arenaria)
Blah coral (Ramaria acrisiccescens)
Habitat: It occurs throughout the conifer forests of the PNW.
Cauliflower coral (Ramaria botrytis)
Clustered coral (Ramaria botrytis)
Crested coral (Clavulina coralloides)
Fetid false coral (Thelephora palmata)
Distribution: T. palmata is widespread and fairly common in North America, Europe, and Asia.
Habitat: Occurs in conifer litter
Flat-top coral (Clavariadelphus truncatus)
Distribution: Broad throughout the Northern Hemisphere
Habitat: Occurs with conifers
Flat-topped coral (Clavariadelphus truncatus)
Distribution: Broad throughout the Northern Hemisphere
Habitat: Occurs with conifers
Golden coral (Ramaria largentii)
Gray coral (Clavulina cinerea)
Green-staining coral (Ramaria abietina)
Distribution: It occurs across the U.S. and Canada and also in Europe and Asia.
Ivory coral (Ramariopsis kunzei)
Largent's coral (Ramaria largentii)
Purple club coral (Alloclavaria purpurea)
Purple coral (Alloclavaria purpurea)
Rosy club coral (Clavaria rosea)
Strap coral (Clavariadelphus ligula)
Strap-shaped coral (Clavariadelphus ligula)
Truncate club coral (Clavariadelphus truncatus)
Distribution: Broad throughout the Northern Hemisphere
Habitat: Occurs with conifers
Violet-branched coral (Clavulina amethystina)
White coral (Ramariopsis kunzei)
Wine-tipped coral (Ramaria botrytis)
Wrinkled coral (Clavulina coralloides)
Wrinkled coral (Clavulina rugosa)
Yellow false coral (Calocera viscosa)
Distribution: It is common, but rarely abundant, in western North America, as well as in Europe and Asia.
Habitat: Occurs on rotting conifer wood in the forests
Yellow-tipped coral (Ramaria formosa)
Goldenthread Cordyceps (Elaphocordyceps ophioglossoides)
Headlike Cordyceps (Elaphocordyceps capitata)
Cinnamon Cort (Cortinarius cinnamomeus)
Pungent Cort (Cortinarius traganus)
Distribution: Broad
Habitat: Abundant in the far-western mountane and boreal regions, but is much less frequent in the Rocky Mountains.
Spotted Cort (Cortinarius iodes)
Violet Cort (Cortinarius violaceus)
Distribution: In some years it is difficult to find but in general it is commonly encountered, but usually in small numbers.
Habitat: Widespread in older forests in PNW region, but much less common in the interior mountains than nearer the coast.
Viscid violet Cort (Cortinarius iodes)
Belted slimy Cortinarius (Cortinarius collinitus)
Blood-red Cortinarius (Cortinarius neosanguineus)
Brown Cortinarius (Cortinarius laniger)
Distribution: Widespread, but variable in its fruiting, in some years being rather common and in others being absent.
Habitat: C. laniger is characteristic of boreal and montane conifer forests.
Bulbous Cortinarius (Cortinarius glaucopus)
Deadly Cortinarius (Cortinarius gentilis)
Distribution: Broad
Habitat: C. gentilis has a broad ecological range, occurring in moist environments as well as drier, upland conifer sites. During the summer in the western mountains it can be very common, often fruiting in groups, sometimes from well rotted woody debris.
Early Cortinarius (Cortinarius trivialis)
Fragrant Cortinarius (Cortinarius percomis)
Lilac conifer Cortinarius (Cortinarius traganus)
Distribution: Broad
Habitat: Abundant in the far-western mountane and boreal regions, but is much less frequent in the Rocky Mountains.
Little brown Cortinarius (Cortinarius obtusus)
Distribution: Broad
Habitat: Widespread species found in a variety of habitats including pine forests and alpine areas with dwarf birch
Pale Cortinarius (Cortinarius pallidifolius)
Pointed Cortinarius (Cortinarius vanduzerensis)
Distribution: Common
Habitat: Coastal conifer forests from northern California to southern Canada.
Purple-staining Cortinarius (Cortinarius mutabilis)
Habitat: Occurs in a variety of habitats with different conifers and is more frequent in moist areas. Most commonly found along the coast, especially with Sitka spruce.
Silvery-violet Cortinarius (Cortinarius alboviolaceus)
Slimy Cortinarius (Cortinarius mucosus)
Sooty olive Cortinarius (Cortinarius infractus)
Violet Cortinarius (Cortinarius violaceus)
Distribution: In some years it is difficult to find but in general it is commonly encountered, but usually in small numbers.
Habitat: Widespread in older forests in PNW region, but much less common in the interior mountains than nearer the coast.
Western red-capped Cortinarius (Cortinarius smithii)
Cramp-balls (Daldinia grandis)
Winter craterelle (Craterellus tubaeformis)
Distribution: Western West Coast
Habitat: Moist forest
Substrate: Mossy rotten wood
Jelly crep (Crepidotus mollis)
Little white crep (Crepidotus epibryus)
Flabby Crepidotus (Crepidotus mollis)
Pink crown (Sarcosphaera coronaria)
Distribution: S. coronaria occurs in spring, mostly in the mountains, often near melting snow, and is a harbinger of morel season. It also occurs in Europe and has been called S. crassa (Santi) Pouzar and S. eximia (Durieu & Léveillé) Maire.
Spores: The spores are broadly ellipsoid (13--22 x 7--10 µm) with blunt ends and usually two large oil drops.
Violet crowncup (Sarcosphaera coronaria)
Distribution: S. coronaria occurs in spring, mostly in the mountains, often near melting snow, and is a harbinger of morel season. It also occurs in Europe and has been called S. crassa (Santi) Pouzar and S. eximia (Durieu & Léveillé) Maire.
Spores: The spores are broadly ellipsoid (13--22 x 7--10 µm) with blunt ends and usually two large oil drops.
Bleeding conifer crust (Stereum sanguinolentum)
Bleeding oak crust (Stereum gausapatum)
Brown-toothed crust (Hydnochaete olivacea)
Elbowpatch crust (Fomitiporia punctata)
Glue crust (Hymenochaete corrugata)
Hairy curtain crust (Stereum hirsutum)
Netted crust (Meruliopsis corium)
Habitat: Downed branches of hardwood or brush piles
Pancake crust (Perenniporia medulla-panis)
Rosy crust (Peniophora incarnata)
Toothed crust (Basidioradulum radula)
Wrinkled crust (Phlebia radiata)
Common Cudonia (Cudonia circinans)
Distribution: Widespread in North America, Europe, and Asia.
Mountain-loving Cudonia (Pachycudonia monticola)
Barnyard cup (Peziza vesiculosa)
Spores: smooth, ellipsoid, 18--24 x 9--14 µm
Bay cup (Peziza badia)
Bladder cup (Peziza vesiculosa)
Spores: smooth, ellipsoid, 18--24 x 9--14 µm
Blistered cup (Peziza vesiculosa)
Spores: smooth, ellipsoid, 18--24 x 9--14 µm
Blue-staining cup (Caloscypha fulgens)
Distribution: Although most common in the western mountains, it occurs across North America, as well as in Europe and temperate Asia.
Brown clustered ear cup (Otidea alutacea)
Brown-black cup (Peziza brunneoatra)
Brown-haired white cup (Humaria hemisphaerica)
Burn site ochre cup (Anthracobia melaloma)
Cellar cup (Peziza domiciliana)
Common dung cup (Peziza vesiculosa)
Spores: smooth, ellipsoid, 18--24 x 9--14 µm
Crustlike cup (Rhizina undulata)
Dazzling cup (Caloscypha fulgens)
Distribution: Although most common in the western mountains, it occurs across North America, as well as in Europe and temperate Asia.
Dwarf acorn cup (Geopyxis carbonaria)
Habitat: Occurs after conifer forest fires
Spores: The spores are smooth, ellipsoid, 11--18 x 6--9 µm, and do not contain prominent oil drops.
Elf cup (Tarzetta cupularis)
Eyelash cup (Scutellinia scutellata)
Eyelash dung cup (Cheilymenia fimicola)
Distribution: Worldwide
Eyelash pixie cup (Scutellinia scutellata)
Fairy's loving cup (Craterellus cornucopioides)
False eyelash cup (Melastiza chateri)
Giant gel cup (Urnula padeniana)
Glazed cup (Humaria hemisphaerica)
Hairy black cup (Pseudoplectania nigrella)
Hairy fairy cup (Humaria hemisphaerica)
Home cup (Peziza domiciliana)
Jelly cup (Heterotextus alpinus)
Habitat: Wet conifer
Long-stalked gray cup (Helvella macropus)
Minute lemon cup (Bisporella citrina)
Spores: ellipsoid, medium-sized (8--14 x 3--5 µm), and have one crosswall and two oil drops at maturity
Pink burn cup (Rhodotarzetta rosea)
Pyxie cup (Geopyxis carbonaria)
Habitat: Occurs after conifer forest fires
Spores: The spores are smooth, ellipsoid, 11--18 x 6--9 µm, and do not contain prominent oil drops.
Red-brown cup (Peziza badia)
Ribbed-stalked cup (Helvella acetabulum)
Rooting fairy cup (Rhizina undulata)
Rough fairy cup (Plicaria trachycarpa)
Scarlet cup (Sarcoscypha coccinea)
Small dung cup (Peziza vesiculosa)
Spores: smooth, ellipsoid, 18--24 x 9--14 µm
Smooth fairy cup (Plicaria endocarpoides)
Spores: 8--10 µm diameter
Sooty cup (Helvella leucomelaena)
Distribution: H. leucomelaena is found in spring and early summer in conifer forests, especially along paths and roadsides.
Stalked bonfire cup (Geopyxis carbonaria)
Habitat: Occurs after conifer forest fires
Spores: The spores are smooth, ellipsoid, 11--18 x 6--9 µm, and do not contain prominent oil drops.
Stalked hairy fairy cup (Lachnum virgineum)
Thick cup (Gyromitra ancilis)
Vinegar cup (Helvella acetabulum)
Violet cup (Peziza sublilacina)
Violet star cup (Sarcosphaera coronaria)
Distribution: S. coronaria occurs in spring, mostly in the mountains, often near melting snow, and is a harbinger of morel season. It also occurs in Europe and has been called S. crassa (Santi) Pouzar and S. eximia (Durieu & Léveillé) Maire.
Spores: The spores are broadly ellipsoid (13--22 x 7--10 µm) with blunt ends and usually two large oil drops.
Vulcan pixie cup (Geopyxis vulcanalis)
White-footed elfin cup (Helvella leucomelaena)
Distribution: H. leucomelaena is found in spring and early summer in conifer forests, especially along paths and roadsides.
Green cups (Chlorociboria aeruginascens)
Distribution: Broad Across North America, Europe, and Asia
Spores: spores (5--8 x 1--2 µm)
Splash cups (Cyathus striatus)
Habitat: It can be common in gardens where woody materials have been added to the planting beds.
Substrate: Cyathus striatus occurs in a number of different habitats on decaying plant materials such as wood chips, small branches, and needles.
Yellow fairy cups (Bisporella citrina)
Spores: ellipsoid, medium-sized (8--14 x 3--5 µm), and have one crosswall and two oil drops at maturity
Oak curtain-crust (Hymenochaete rubiginosa)
Cyans (Psilocybe cyanescens)
Conifer Cystoderma (Cystoderma fallax)
Distribution: Only in North America
Habitat: It occurs in a variety of habitats, including conifer, mixed, and hardwood forests on litter, humus, rotting wood, and in mosses.
Pure Cystoderma (Cystoderma amianthinum)
Unspotted Cystoderma (Cystoderma amianthinum)
Vermilion Cystoderma (Cystodermella cinnabarina)