Vascular Plants

Includes all flowering plants, conifers, ferns and fern-allies.

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Common names beginning with N:
47 common names
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Western dock o n (Rumex occidentalis)
Distribution: Distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to central California, east to North Dakota and New Mexico.
Habitat: Moist to swampy areas and wet meadows, from the sea coast to foothill valleys.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Nagoonberry (Rubus arcticus)
Distribution: Alaska to Newfoundland, south to Vancouver Island and southern British Columbia, and in the Rocky Mountains to Colorado.
Habitat: Tundra to high mountain meadows, bogs and woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Or slender naias (Najas flexilis)
Distribution: Distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Arizona, and across the northern half of North America.
Habitat: Fresh to slightly brackish water.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-August
Leafy nama (Nama densa)
Distribution: Adams County, Washington, south to California and east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Dry, sandy places in the deserts and foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Matted nama (Nama densa)
Distribution: Adams County, Washington, south to California and east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Dry, sandy places in the deserts and foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Nap-at-noon (Ornithogalum umbellatum)
Distribution: Distributed in scattered locations throughout Washington; occurring chiefly in central and eastern United States, with scattered locations in western states.
Habitat: Roadsides, open forests, waste places.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: April-May
Pheasant's eye narcissus (Narcissus poeticus)
Distribution: Occasional escape in lowland western Washington; occasional escape in areas throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Roadsides, fields and waste places.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April-May
Poet's narcissus (Narcissus poeticus)
Distribution: Occasional escape in lowland western Washington; occasional escape in areas throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Roadsides, fields and waste places.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April-May
Green nassella (Nassella viridula)
Origin: Native
Brewer's navarretia (Navarretia breweri)
Distribution: East of the Cascades, Douglas County, Washington, south to California, east to Wyoming and Arizona
Habitat: Dry, open areas and meadows, from the foothills to moderate elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Great Basin navarretia (Navarretia propinqua)
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Least navarretia (Navarretia leucocephala)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Klickitat County, Washington, and Oregon, south to northern California.
Habitat: Moist meadows and vernal pools, and other moist, open places in the foothills and lowlands.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Marigold navarretia (Navarretia tagetina)
Distribution: Klickitat County, Washington, south to California.
Habitat: Dry, open places at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Needleleaf navarretia (Navarretia intertexta)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains in the U.S.
Habitat: Open slopes, meadows and margins of pools, from the lowlands to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Northern navarretia (Navarretia tagetina)
Distribution: Klickitat County, Washington, south to California.
Habitat: Dry, open places at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Yellow-flowered navarretia (Navarretia breweri)
Distribution: East of the Cascades, Douglas County, Washington, south to California, east to Wyoming and Arizona
Habitat: Dry, open areas and meadows, from the foothills to moderate elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Needle-and-thread (Hesperostipa comata)
Distribution: British Columbia south on the east side of the Cascades to California, east to Ontario and Texas.
Habitat: Plains and prairies to forested areas in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Common western needlegrass (Achnatherum occidentale)
Origin: Native
Lemmon's needlegrass (Achnatherum lemmonii)
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; south-central British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Arizona.
Habitat: Valleys to mid-elevations in the mountains, often in ponderosa pine forests.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Nevada needlegrass (Achnatherum nevadense)
Origin: Native
Small-flowered nemophila (Nemophila parviflora)
Distribution: More common west of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Utah.
Habitat: Shady, wooded slopes, low to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Spreading nemophila (Nemophila pedunculata)
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, south to Baja California, east to Nevada and Idaho.
Habitat: Moist, open places, like meadows and bottom lands, in the foothills and lowlands, occasionally somewhat higher.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Burning nettle (Urtica urens)
Distribution: Introduced sparsely in western Washington; distributed throughout much of North America except parts of the Midwest and Intermountain West.
Habitat: Moist, disturbed soil.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June-July
Horse nettle (Solanum carolinense)
Origin: Introduced
Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: In deep, rich soil or near moisture, sagebrush deserts, shady lowlands and mountain slopes, sea level to subalpine.
Origin: Both native and introduced
Flowers: May-September
White horse nettle (Solanum elaeagnifolium)
Origin: Introduced from Mexico and eastern United States
American black nightshade (Solanum americanum)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east along the southern border of the U.S. to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Disturbed open areas, roadsides, waste ground.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July-September
Bittersweet nightshade (Solanum dulcamara)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Thickets, clearings and open woods, usually in moist soil
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-September
Climbing nightshade (Solanum dulcamara)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Thickets, clearings and open woods, usually in moist soil
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-September
Cut-leaf nightshade (Solanum triflorum)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; widespread throughout North America, except eastern U.S.
Habitat: Weedy native in fields and roadsides, often in undisturbed sites at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-August
Deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna)
Origin: Introduced
Enchanter's nightshade (Circaea alpina)
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska to Newfoundland, south (mostly in the mountains) to California and Georgia.
Habitat: Cool, damp woods, low to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
European black nightshade (Solanum nigrum)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Fields, roadsides and other disturbed sites, especially in moister areas; often in urban and suburban areas.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July-November
Hairy nightshade (Solanum physalifolium)
Origin: Introduced
Horned nightshade (Solanum rostratum)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington, where it is considered a noxious weed; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Roadsides and other disturbed areas, often where dry.
Origin: Introduced from central US
Flowers: June-September
Silver-leaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium)
Origin: Introduced from Mexico and eastern United States
Mallow ninebark (Physocarpus malvaceus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades, British Columbia to Oregon, east to Alberta and Montana, and south to Utah and Wyoming
Habitat: Canyons and hillsides, grasslands, ponderosa pine and Douglas fir forests
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Mallow-leaf ninebark (Physocarpus malvaceus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades, British Columbia to Oregon, east to Alberta and Montana, and south to Utah and Wyoming
Habitat: Canyons and hillsides, grasslands, ponderosa pine and Douglas fir forests
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Pacific ninebark (Physocarpus capitatus)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington, but found chiefly on the west side; Alaska south to California, east to Alberta and Idaho.
Habitat: Moist woods and swamps in the lower mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Nippleseed (Plantago major)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; a cosmopolitan weed widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Roadsides, fields and other disturbed, open areas.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April-August
Common nipplewort (Lapsana communis)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington, but more often west of the crest; BC to CA, scattered elsewhere in western North America, and more common in central and eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas including roadsides, wastelots, fields, and forest edge.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: June-July
Nipplewort (Lapsana communis)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington, but more often west of the crest; BC to CA, scattered elsewhere in western North America, and more common in central and eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas including roadsides, wastelots, fields, and forest edge.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: June-July
Jack go to bed at noon (Tragopogon pratensis)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Roadsides, fields and waste places, usually in slightly moist areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-August
Yellow nut-grass (Cyperus esculentus)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widespread throughout North America.
Habitat: Moist, low ground along streams and ditches, but sometimes in drier ground.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Canadian water nymph (Najas canadensis)
Origin: Native
Slender nymph (Najas flexilis)
Distribution: Distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Arizona, and across the northern half of North America.
Habitat: Fresh to slightly brackish water.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-August
Wavy water nymph (Najas flexilis)
Distribution: Distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Arizona, and across the northern half of North America.
Habitat: Fresh to slightly brackish water.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-August