Vascular Plants

Includes all flowering plants, conifers, ferns and fern-allies.


Browse by scientific name:

A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z
Scientific names beginning with D:
Dactylis glomerataorchard grass
Distribution: Distributed widely throughout Washington; distributed widely throughout North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas such as meadows, fields, roadsides, and forest edges; common forage plant; also planted in logged areas in the mountains.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-August
Dactylorhiza viridisfrog-orchis, Frog-orchis, long-bracted orchid
Distribution: Known only from Okanogan County in Washington; Alaska south to Washington, east across the southern half of Canada to the Atlantic Coast; south in the Rocky Mountains to New Mexico; east from the upper Midwest to the northeastern U.S., south in the Appalachian Mts.
Habitat: Moist to wet meadows at moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Dalea ornataBlue Mountain prairie-clover
Distribution: Distributed in the central and southeastern counties in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Dry, rocky or sandy areas, often in sagebrush, low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Damasonium californicumfringed water-plantain, star water-plantain
Distribution: Known only from Klickitat County in Washington; Washington south to California, east to southwest Idaho and western Navada.
Habitat: Sloughs, ditches and marshy fields.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
Danthonia californicaCalifornia oatgrass
Distribution: British Columbia south on both sides of the Cascades to California, east to Montana and New Mexico.
Habitat: Open, grassy meadows to rocky ridges, from coastal prairies to mid-elevations in the mountains, often with ponderosa pine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Danthonia decumbenscommon heath-grass, mountain heath-grass
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July - September
Danthonia intermediatimber oatgrass
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Danthonia spicatapoverty oatgrass
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south on both sides of the Cascades to Oregon, east to Newfoundland and eastern United States.
Habitat: Sandy to rocky soil in dry woods and fairly dry meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
Danthonia unispicatafew-flower oatgrass, one-spike oatgrass
Distribution: British Columbia south on both sides of the Cascades to California, east to Alberta and Colorado.
Habitat: Dry to occasionally moist prairies, foothills, and open parks and ridges in mountain forests.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Daphne laureolaspurge-laurel
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south, west of the Cascades, to Oregon.
Habitat: Roadsides and open, moist woods in the lowlands.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: March-June
Daphne mezereummezereon, paradise-plant mezereon
Origin: Introduced
Darlingtonia californicacobraplant
Distribution: Introduced at Summer Lake in Washington; Lane County, Oregon to northwest California.
Habitat: Bogs along coast, along streams, often on serpentine
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June - August
Dasiphora fruticosashrubby cinquefoil
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to New Jersey.
Habitat: Lower foothills to subalpine slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Datura innoxiaangel's-trumpet
Origin: Introduced
Datura stramoniumjimsonweed
Distribution: Scattered localities in eastern Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Waste places and roadsides, often in dry soil.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-August
Datura wrightiisacred thorn apple, jimson weed
Distribution: Scattered locations across Washington; California east across the U.S. to New England.
Habitat: Disturbed, dry, open areas, roadsides, and waste places.
Origin: Introduced from Mexico
Flowers: June-August
Daucus carotaQueen Anne's-lace, wild carrot
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; Widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Roadsides, ditchbanks, somewhat moist waste land.
Origin: Introduced; native to Europe
Flowers: June-August
Daucus pusillusAmerican wild carrot
Distribution: Pacific Northwest to California, and throughout the Southern States; chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington
Habitat: Dry, open areas at low elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Delphinium ajacisdoubtful knight's-spur
Distribution: Limited in distribution to a few localities west of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Drainage ditches, roadsides, old home sites, waste areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-July
Delphinium basalticumbasaltic larkspur
Origin: Native
Delphinium ×burkei
Origin: Native
Delphinium depauperatumslim larkspur
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Montana, Idaho, and Nevada.
Habitat: Moist meadows and forest openings.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Delphinium distichumtwo-spike larkspur
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon, east to Montana and Wyoming.
Habitat: Vernally wet swales and meadows, in sagebrush or ponderosa pine forest.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Delphinium glareosumOlympic larkspur
Distribution: In the Olympic and Cascades mountains of Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon.
Habitat: Alpine and subalpine ridges and talus slopes, sometimes found at lower elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Delphinium glaucumpale larkspur
Distribution: Widely distributed in mountainous areas throughout Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains of Canada and U.S.
Habitat: Wet places at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Delphinium leucophaeumpale larkspur
Distribution: Known only from Lewis County in Washington; Lewis County, Washington south to Willamette Valley, Oregon.
Habitat: Bluffs, open ground, and moist lowland meadows where undisturbed.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Delphinium lineapetalumthin-petal larkspur
Distribution: Endemic to Washington, primarily found in the Wenatchee Mountains of Chelan and Kittitas Counties in Washington.
Habitat: Meadows and forest openings in foothills and valleys.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Delphinium menziesiiMenzies larkspur
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon.
Habitat: Coastal bluffs and prairies to moist meadows and forest openings at moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Delphinium multiplexKittitas larkspur
Distribution: Wenatchee Mountains of Kittitas and Chelan Counties, Washington, south to northern Yakima County.
Habitat: Along rocky, usually intermitant streams or springs in sagebrush hills to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late May - Early August
Delphinium nuttallianumtwo-lobe larkspur, upland larkspur
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Dry, gravelly ground, sagebrush deserts to the ponderosa pine region in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-July
Delphinium nuttalliiNuttall's larkspur
Distribution: Pierce and eastern Grays Harbor Counties, Washington, south to the Columbia River Gorge and Clackamus County, Oregon.
Habitat: Gravelly outwash prairies and basaltic cliffs.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Delphinium occidentalewestern larkspur
Origin: Native
Delphinium stachydeumhedgenettle larkspur, spiked larkspur
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late June - Early August
Delphinium sutherlandiisutherland's larkspur
Origin: Native
Delphinium trolliifoliumcow-poison, poison larkspur
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest and in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Moist, shady woods at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Delphinium viridescensWenatchee larkspur
Distribution: Local in the Wenatchee Mountains, Chelan and Kittitas Counties, Washington.
Habitat: Boggy meadowlands.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Delphinium xantholeucumyellow-white larkspur
Distribution: Southern Okanogan County to southern Chelan County, east into Douglas County, Washington
Habitat: Dry, grassy hillsides and ponderosa pine forests
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - June
Dendrolycopodium dendroideumprickly tree clubmoss, tree ground-pine
Distribution: Widespread across boreal forests of North America, south to northern Washington, Idaho, Montana, Colorado, and NE U.S. Also found in Asia. In Washington, known from scattered locations in the west Cascades and in Pend Oreille county.
Habitat: Woodlands and open brushy areas. In Washington, found mostly among rock or talus with thick moss or duff layers, often under brush or on edges of forest. At mid elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Deschampsia cespitosabering hair grass, Pacific hair grass, tufted hair grass, Beringian hairgrass, tufted hairgrass
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: From coastal marshes and moist prairies to alpine ridges, talus slopes, mountain meadows, and moist areas in the mountains in general.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Deschampsia danthonioidesannual hair grass
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late May - July
Deschampsia elongataslender hair grass
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Alberta, Montana and New Mexico.
Habitat: Moist sandy or gravelly banks and slopes, and borders of streams and lakes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
Descurainia incanamountain tansymustard
Origin: Native
Descurainia incisa
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon and Nevada, east to the Rocky Mountains from Montana to Arizona, but not New Mexico.
Habitat: Moderately dry forest openings and sagebrush steppe.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
ssp. incisa – cut-leaved tansymustard
Descurainia longepedicellatamountain tansymustard, narrow tansymustard, sticky tansymustard
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon and Nevada, east to the Rocky Mountains from Montana to Arizona, but not New Mexico.
Habitat: Moderately dry forest openings and sagebrush steppe.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Descurainia nelsoniiNelson's tansymustard, sagebrush tansymustard
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to California, east to Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and Nevada.
Habitat: Sagrebrush-steppe to open montane forests.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Descurainia pinnatawestern tansymustard
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington, but chiefly to the east; widely distributed throughout most of North America.
Habitat: Weedy native of fairly dry, open ground.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
ssp. brachycarpa – shortpod tansymustard, western tansymustard
Descurainia sophiaflixweed
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; introduced in most of the United States and Canada
Habitat: Weed of dry waste ground and other disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: March-July
Dianthus armeriadeptford pink
Distribution: Introduced in most of the United States
Habitat: Escaped from gardens
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June - August
Dianthus barbatussweet William
Distribution: Introduced ornamental that occastionally escapes in western Washington and Oregon.
Habitat: Wasteland and disturbed soil.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June - August
Dianthus deltoidesmaiden pink
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April - July
Dicentra cucullariaDutchman's-breeches
Distribution: Occurring in Washington along the Columbia and Snake Rivers; southern Washington south to north-central Oregon, east to western Idaho; central and southeastern U.S. to New England and Nova Scotia.
Habitat: Moist woods and gravelly banks at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-May
Dicentra formosaPacific bleedingheart
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington, occasional on the east slope of the Cascades at mid-elevations; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Moist woods, from the coast to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-July
ssp. formosa – Pacific bleeding heart
Dicentra unifloralong-horn steer's-head
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Colorado.
Habitat: Well-drained soil, foothills to subalpine slopes; blooms soon after the snow leaves.
Origin: Native
Flowers: February-June
Dichanthelium acuminatumhairy perennial panicgrass
Distribution: Southern British Columbia south along the coast to California; east of the Cascades mainly along water courses or around springs in the mountains, east to Montana and Wyoming.
Habitat: Rocky or sandy river banks or lake margins to open woods, marshy areas or dry prairies, from sea level to high elevation in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
ssp. fasciculatum – hairy panicgrass
Dichanthelium oligosanthesScribner's perennial panicgrass
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south on both sides of the Cascades to northern California, east to Idaho, Montana and Utah, also in eastern North America.
Habitat: Dry prairies or rocky areas to sandy stream banks.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
ssp. scribnerianum – Scribner's panicgrass witchgrass
Dichelostemma congestumookow, northern saitas
Distribution: Scattered locations in Washington from the east side of the Olympic Peninsula and Island County to the Columbia River; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Grassy meadows, rocky prairies and sagebrush slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Dichodon viscidumdoubtful mouse-ear chickweed
Origin: Introduced
Dieteria canescenshoary-aster
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; southern British Columbia to southern California, east to Saskatchewan and Arizona.
Habitat: Dry, open places in the plains and foothills, occasionally extending into the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
var. incana – tall hoary aster, hoary-aster
Digitalis purpureapurple foxglove
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Montana in the west, and Wisconsin to Maine, south to west Virginia, in eastern United States.
Habitat: Widespread and common near roads, sea level to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-July
Digitaria ischaemumsmooth crabgrass
Distribution: Most of southern Canada, and all of the United States except the extreme southeast and southwest.
Habitat: Lawns, roadsides and wastland, usually where moist.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: July - September
Digitaria sanguinalishairy crabgrass
Distribution: A weed in most of the United States.
Habitat: Lawns, gardens, and wasteland.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: July - October
Dionaea muscipulaVenus fly trap
Distribution: Sparingly introduced in localities in western Washington.
Habitat: Bogs, lake margins, swamps.
Origin: Introduced from southeast United States
Flowers: July-August
Diphasiastrum alpinumalpine clubmoss ground-pine
Distribution: Alaska to northern Washington, east to northern Idaho and northwest Montana.
Habitat: Rocky slopes, dry heath meadows, and open conifer forests at high elevations. In Washington, often found associated with Phyllodoce, Cassiope, and Vaccinium in dry heath soils.
Origin: Native
Diphasiastrum alpinum Diphasiastrum sitchensehybrid clubmoss
Distribution: Known from British Columbia south to Oregon and east to Montana, also in Greenland and Newfoundland.
Habitat: Upper montane coniferous forest and brushy areas, and subalpine and alpine meadows. In Washington, has been found in subalpine-alpine heath meadows and on shaded mossy mineral soil below conifers on high montane roadcuts.
Origin: Native
Diphasiastrum complanatumground cedar, trailing ground-pine
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington, primarily in the northern half of the state; Alaska south to Washington, Idaho and Montana, east across Canada and the northern U.S. to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Moist to dry, usually coniferous forests, rocky slopes and sandy openings, low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Spores: Sporing structures in summer and fall
Diphasiastrum sitchenseAlaskan clubmoss, Sitka clubmoss
Distribution: Alaska to Oregon, east to Idaho and Montana, and across central Canada to northeastern U.S. and eastern Canada; also in eastern Asia from Japan north.
Habitat: Subalpine-alpine meadows and open rocky areas at mid-to high elevations in the mountains; occasionally in conifer forest or under brush.
Origin: Native
Diplachne fuscaclustered salt-grassprangletop, loose-flowered sprangletop
Distribution: Occurring in a few scattered locations chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: August-September
ssp. fascicularis – bearded sprangletop
Diplacus cusickioidesnesom's monkey-flower
Distribution: Known only from Klickitat County in Washington; Washington to California, east to Idaho
Habitat: Open, gravelly, dry slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
Diplacus nanusdwarf purple monkey-flower, dwarf purple monkeyflower
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Colorado.
Habitat: Open, very dry areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Diplotaxis tenuifoliaslimleaf wall rocket
Origin: Introduced
Dipsacus fullonumfuller's teasel
Distribution: Widely distributed in Washington; introduced throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Weed of moist ground and disturbed areas in the lowlands.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July-September
Distichlis spicataalkaline grass, coastal salt grass
Distribution: Vancouver Island, British Columbia, south to California; also along the east coast of the United States from Canada to Florida and Texas.
Habitat: Coastal beaches and salt marshes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - September
Dodecatheon alpinumalpine shootingstar
Distribution: Known from south-central portion of Washington; Washington south to California, east to Utah and Arizona.
Habitat: Moist to wet areas in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Dodecatheon austrofrigidumtundra shootingstar
Distribution: Occurring in coastal counties in southwestern Washington; Washington south to northwestern Oregon in coastal counties.
Habitat: Moist basaltic slopes, cliff faces, in coniferous forests along streams, or in alpine meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Dodecatheon conjugensslimpod shooting star, desert shooting star
Distribution: East slopes of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, east to Alberta and Wyoming
Habitat: Vernally moist areas in sagebrush to meadows at mid-elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - June
Dodecatheon dentatumwhite shooting star
Distribution: Olympic Mountains and east of the Cascades, British Columbia to northern Oregon; also in central Idaho
Habitat: Streambanks and other wet places at moderate elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
– white shooting star
Dodecatheon dentatumwhite shooting star
Distribution: Olympic Mountains and east of the Cascades, British Columbia to northern Oregon; also in central Idaho
Habitat: Streambanks and other wet places at moderate elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
– white shooting star
Dodecatheon hendersoniibroad-leaved shooting star, Henderson's shooting star
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Woods and prairies, at low elevations in our area.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-June
Dodecatheon jeffreyitall mountain shooting star, Jeffrey's shooting star
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Montana and Wyoming; in the Olympic and Cascade Mountains in Washington
Habitat: Wet meadows and stream banks, mid- to high elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Dodecatheon poeticumpoet's shootingstar, narcissus shooting star
Distribution: From around Satus Creek, Yakima County, Washington, to Klickitat and Skamania Counties, south to Wasco and Hood River Counties, Oregon.
Habitat: Grassy slopes to drier woods, usually where vernally moist, often near seeps or springs along basaltic outcrops.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March - May
Dodecatheon pulchellum
Distribution: Alaska to Mexico, east to Pennsylvania; found throughout the Pacific Northwest
Habitat: Coastal prairies to inland saline swamps and shrub-steppe, sea level to timberline
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
var. cusickii – Cusick's shootingstar, Cusick's shooting star, sticky shooting star
var. pulchellum – dark-throated shooting star
Doronicum pardalianchesgreat leopard's-bane
Distribution: Known from Skamania County in Washington; southwestern British Columbia to Portland Oregon.
Habitat: Disturbed, open, generally moist soil
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: March-November
Douglasia laevigatasmooth Douglasia, cliff dwarf primrose
Distribution: West of the Cascade crest in Washington; Alaska to Oregon, and in the Washington Olympics.
Habitat: Moist coastal bluffs to rocky alpine ridges.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-August
Douglasia nivalissnow Douglasii
Distribution: Wenatchee Mountains of Kittitas County, Washington, north into Chelan, Douglas, and Okanogan counties.
Habitat: Sagebrush slopes to alpine ridges and talus, often in serpentine soils.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-August
Downingia bacigalupiiBach's downingia
Origin: Native
Downingia eleganscommon downingia
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington, though known from scattered locations west of the Cascades crest; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Vernal pools, wet meadows, margins of ponds.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Downingia pulcherrimashowy downingia
Origin: Native
Downingia willamettensisWillamette downingia
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Marshes, wet meadows and edges of ponds.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-August
Draba albertinaAlaska draba, slender whitlow-grass
Distribution: Occurring in the the Olympics and Cascades Mountains in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: From subalpine meadows and forest openings to alpine meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Draba aureagolden draba whitlow-grass
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Draba aureolaalpine whitlow-grass, great alpine whitlow-grass, Mt. Lassen draba whitlow-grass
Distribution: Currently only known only from the Mt. Rainier area in Washington; Washington south to northern California
Habitat: Alpine areas, including scree and moraine areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Draba canalance-leaved draba
Origin: Native
Draba crassifoliaRocky Mountain draba, thick-leaved draba, snowbed whitlow-grass
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympic Mountains and North Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to Washington, Nevada, east to the Rocky Mountains; east across northern Canada to Greenland; northern Europe.
Habitat: Subalpine and alpine meadows, often in rock crevices and outcroppings.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Draba densifoliaNuttall's draba, dense-leaf whitlow-grass
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Alberta, Idaho, Wyoming, Nevada and Utah.
Habitat: Open, rocky places from mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Draba incertawhitlow-wort, Yellowstone draba whitlow-wort
Distribution: Occurring in the Cascades and Olympic Mountains in Washington; British Columbia and Alberta south to Washington, east to Montana and Wyoming.
Habitat: Alpine and subalpine slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Draba lonchocarpalancefruit draba, lancefruit draba whitlow-wort
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska to California, east to Northwest Territories, south in Rocky mountains to Colorado.
Habitat: Alpine slopes, talus, and rocky outcroppings.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Draba nemorosawoods draba, woodland whitlow-grass
Distribution: In scattered locations on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east across the northern half of the U.S. and Canada to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Disturbed open areas and forest edges at low moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-June
Draba novolympicadraba, Payson's whitlow-grass draba
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympics and Cascades mountains of Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Open slopes, talus ridges, and other exposed areas in the alpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Draba oligospermafew-seeded draba whitlow-grass
Distribution: In the North Cascades mountains in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Colorado.
Habitat: Plains to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Draba platycarpabroad-pod whitlow-grass
Origin: Native
Flowers: March - June
Draba praealtadraba, tall whitlow-grass draba
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Draba reptansCarolina whitlow-grass
Origin: Native
Flowers: March - May
Draba ruaxescoast mountain whitlow-grass draba
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Draba stenolobaAlaska whitlow-grass
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - August
Draba tayloriTaylor's draba
Origin: Native
Draba thompsoniiThompson's draba
Origin: Native
Draba vernaspring whitlow-grass
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America; circumboreal.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe, grasslands, and open disturbed areas at low to middle elevations.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: February-May
Dracocephalum parviflorumAmerican dragonhead
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed across much of North America except in several states along the southern U.S. border.
Habitat: Open, often moist places at low to middle elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Dracunculus vulgaris
Origin: Introduced
Drosera anglicaEnglish sundew, giant sundew
Distribution: In scattered localities on both sides of the Cascades; Alaska south to the Sierra Nevada of California, east to the Great Lakes region and eastern Canada.
Habitat: Bogs and swamps.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Drosera ×obovata
Origin: Native
Drosera rotundifoliaround-leaf sundew
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington, but also in scattered localities east of the Cascades crest; Alaska to California, east across Montana and North Dakota, and most of the United states east of the Mississipps River.
Habitat: Swamps and bogs, lowlands to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Dryas drummondiiyellow mountain-avens
Distribution: Alaska south to the northern Cascades and Selkirk Mountains of Washington, the Wallowa Mountains of Oregon, and the Rocky Mountains of Idaho and Montana
Habitat: High mountains, often above timberline, but down to lower elevations along streams
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - Early July
Dryas hookerianawhite dryas, Hooker's mountain-avens, white mountain-avens
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to Washington, northeast Oregon, and in the Rockies from Montana to Colorado.
Habitat: Open, rocky areas, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Drymocallis argutacordilleran drymocallis
Origin: Native
Drymocallis glandulosa
Distribution: In Washington from the coast to mid elevations in the mountains; south to California and east to Montana.
Habitat: Open, mesic areas from coastal meadows to forest openings.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
ssp. glabrata – Idaho wood beauty
ssp. glandulosa – gland cinquefoil, sticky cinquefoil
ssp. pseudorupestris – cliff drymocallis
Dryopteris argutacoastal fern, marginal wood fern
Distribution: Cheifly west of the Cascade summits, southern Washington to California and east to Arizona; also in the mountains of eastern Oregon.
Habitat: Mostly in the woods, but occasionally in more open areas.
Origin: Native
Dryopteris carthusianaspinulose fern, toothed wood fern
Distribution: Circumboreal, extending south in North America to Oregon and northern California from the Cascades to the coast; also in northern Idaho and northwest Wyoming.
Habitat: Moist woods and streambanks.
Origin: Native
Dryopteris cristatacrested wood fern fern, shield fern
Distribution: Circumboreal, extending south in North America to northern Idaho, northwest Montana, and Arkansas.
Habitat: Moist woods and thickets.
Origin: Native
Dryopteris expansanorthern fern, spreading wood fern
Distribution: Circumboreal; throughout the Pacific Northwest
Habitat: Moist to wet woods and streambanks
Origin: Native
Dryopteris filix-masmale fern
Origin: Native
Duchesnea indicaIndian-strawberry, mock-stawberry
Distribution: Introduced west of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, and in the east, Nebraska to New York south to Texas to Florida
Habitat: Ornamental, occasionally escapes
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - June
Dulichium arundinaceumthree-way sedge
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington, but also in Chelan, Yakima and Pend Oreille counties; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho, Montana and to the eastern half of North America.
Habitat: Wet meadows, marshes, and shores of ponds and lakes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Dysphania ambrosioidesMexican tea, wormseed
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations in Washington; native to southeastern U.S., but introduced in scattered localities in central and western U.S.
Habitat: Roadsides and waste areas, riparian zones, tolerant of alkaline.
Origin: Introduced from southern North America and tropical America
Flowers: July-November
Dysphania botrysJerusalem oak goosefoot, Jerusalem oak
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Weed of roadsides, waste areas and streambanks.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-October
Dysphania pumiliosmall crumbweed, clammy goosefoot
Distribution: Introduced over much of the United States.
Habitat: Sandy or gravelly soiles, waste areas.
Origin: Introduced from Australia
Flowers: July - September