Asteraceae
Aster Family
Synonyms:
Compositae [HC]
128 genera
441 species
118 subspecies and varieties
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Achillea millefoliummilfoil, yarrow
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington, from the coast to the alpine; circumboreal; widespread throughout North America.
Habitat: Common in open, dry to somewhat moist areas from low to high elevations; tolerant of disturbance.
Origin: Both native and introduced populations
Flowers: April-October
Achillea ptarmicapearl yarrow
Distribution: Introduced in Washington to Montana, and northeastern United States
Habitat: Occasionally escaped from cultivation
Origin: Introduced
Adenocaulon bicolorpathfinder, trailplant
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east through the Rockies to Wisconsin and Ontario.
Habitat: Moist, shady woods at low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Ageratina occidentaliswestern boneset, western snakeroot
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho and Utah.
Habitat: Rocky places at various altitudes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Agoseris ×agrestisfield agoseris
Origin: Native
Agoseris apargioidesseaside agoseris
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
var. maritima – seaside agoseris
Agoseris aurantiacaorange agoseris
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska to California, east to Wyoming and New Mexico.
Habitat: Mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
var. aurantiaca – orange agoseris, slender agoseris
var. carnea – pink agoseris
Agoseris ×elatatall agoseris, tall goat-chicory
Distribution: On both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Meadows and open woods, from the valleys to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
Agoseris glaucapale agoseris, short-beaked agoseris
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Michigan and New Mexico.
Habitat: Open forests and open areas, low to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
var. dasycephala – pale goat-chicory
var. glauca – pale agoseris, short beaked agoseris
Agoseris grandifloralarge-flowered agoseris
Distribution: Distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia to California, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Meadows and other open places in the lowlands and at moderate elevations in the mountains, often in dry areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
var. grandiflora – large flowered agoseris, large flower goat-chicory
var. leptophylla – Puget Sound agoseris
Agoseris heterophyllaannual agoseris
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Arizona.
Habitat: Dry, open areas at low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Agoseris monticolamountain agoseris, Sierra Nevada agoseris
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Nevada.
Habitat: Mesic meadows in the subalpine and alpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Agoseris retrorsaspear leaved agoseris, spear leaf goat-chicory
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Nevada, Utah, and Arizona.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe and ponderosa pine forest openings.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Ambrosia acanthicarpaflat spine bur-ragweed, annual bursage, bur ragweed
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades, but widespread in western United States, to Texas and the Dakotas
Habitat: Weedy native in dry areas at low elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - October
Ambrosia artemisiifoliaannual ragweed, common ragweed
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; widespread throughout North America; also introduced in Europe.
Habitat: Dry, disturbed, open areas at low elevations, including roadsides, pastures, and wastelots.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August-October
Ambrosia chamissonissilver beachweed, beach bur, cutleaf beach bur, silver burr-ragweed
Distribution: Maritime shoreline from British Columbia to california
Habitat: Common on sandy beaches above high tide level
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - September
Ambrosia psilostachyaperennial ragweed, western ragweed
Distribution: Occurring in the eastern portion of Washington; widely distributed throughout North America except for Alaska and far northern Canada.
Habitat: Waste ground.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
Ambrosia trifidagiant ragweed
Distribution: Native and widespread in central and eastern United States; an occasional introduction in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Waste places, usually in moist soil.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July - October
Anaphalis margaritaceapearly everlasting
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; occurring throughout North America except for portions of central and southeastern U.S.
Habitat: Dry to somewhat moist open areas, low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Anisocarpus madioideswoodland tarplant, tarweed, woodland tarweed
Distribution: Southern British Columbia to southern California.
Habitat: Open woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Antennaria alpinaalpine pussytoes
Distribution: Chiefly in the Cascades and Olympic Mountains of Washington; Circumboreal, extending south in the high mountains to California and Colorado.
Habitat: Alpine meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Antennaria anaphaloidestall pussytoes
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades, British Columbia to Oregon, east to Montana and Colorado.
Habitat: Hillsides and open woods at moderate elevations in the mountains, occasionally on grassy foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Antennaria corymbosaflat topped pussytoes, meadow pussytoes
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Antennaria dimorphacushion pussytoes, low pussytoes
Distribution: British Columbia to southern California, east to Montana, Nebraska and Colorado; east of the Cascades in central and eastern Washington.
Habitat: Dry, open places in lowlands to foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - May
Antennaria flagellarisstoloniferous everlasting, flagellate pussytoes, whip pussytoes
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington and Oregon, east to Wyoming
Habitat: Shrub-steppe to dry, open areas at mid-elevations, often in lithosol
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - July
Antennaria geyeriGeyer's pussytoes, pinewoods pussytoes
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Antennaria howellii
Distribution: British Columbia to Oregon, east to Montana
Habitat: Open woods at low to moderate elevations; not common.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
ssp. howellii – Howell's pussytoes
ssp. neodioica – Blue Mountains everlasting, field pussytoes
Antennaria lanatawoolly everlasting, woolly pussytoes
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon, east to Alberta and Wyoming.
Habitat: Mountain meadows near timberline.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Antennaria luzuloidessilvery brown everlasting, woodrush pussytoes
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington. British Columbia south to California, east to Colorado and South Dakota.
Habitat: Open, moderately dry areas from foothills to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
ssp. luzuloides – silvery brown everlasting, woodrush pussytoes
Antennaria mediaalpine pussytoes, Rocky Mountain pussytoes
Distribution: Circumboreal, south at high elevations in the mountains to California and Arizona
Habitat: Uncommon in high mountain meadows
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - September
Antennaria microphyllarosy everlasting, desert pussytoes, elegant pussytoes, pulvinate pussytoes, rosy pussytoes, small-leaf pussytoes
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to North Dakota and Arizona, from lower montane to sub-alpine.
Habitat: Moist, open areas, flood plains of streams, margins of alkali depressions.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Antennaria monocephalapygmy pussytoes
Origin: Native
Antennaria parvifolialittle-leaf pussytoes
Distribution: Eastern base of the Rocky Mountains, extending westward rarely to eastern Washington and British Columbia.
Habitat: Foothills and dry open areas to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Antennaria pulcherrimashowy pussytoes
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - August
Antennaria racemosaslender everlasting, Hooker's pussytoes, raceme pussytoes
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout the forested and mountainous areas of Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the northern Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Open, modertely dry areas from low to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Antennaria stenophyllanarrowleaved pussytoes
Distribution: East of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Nevada, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe, dry meadows and open woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Antennaria umbrinellabrown everlasting, brown-bract pussytoes, umber pussytoes
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Uncommon in openings in the forest at moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Anthemis arvensiscorn chamomile, field chamomile
Distribution: Introduced in much of the United States; more common west of the Cascades in Washington
Habitat: Roadsides, disturbed areas
Origin: Introduced
Anthemis cotulamayweed chamomile, stinking chamomile, dogfennel
Distribution: Introduced throughout the United States
Habitat: Weed of roadsides and disturbed area
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - October
Arctium lappagreat burdock, greater burdock
Distribution: Known from a few scattered locations in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America except the central U.S.
Habitat: Disturbed areas including roadsides, wastelots, and forest openings.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August-October
Arctium minuscommon burdock, lesser burdock
Distribution: Introduced throughout the United States
Habitat: Weed of roadsides and disturbed area
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July - October
Arnica chamissonisleafy arnica, meadow arnica, narrowleaf arnica, silvery arnica, leafy leapordbane
Distribution: Occurring in the Cascades and northeastern corner of Washington; Alaska south to California, east across Canada and to the Rockies in the U.S.
Habitat: Meadows and wet places at moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Arnica cordifoliaheart leaf arnica, hear-leaf leopardbane
Distribution: Pacific Northwest, including southern British Columbia, and east into the Rocky Mountains
Habitat: Moderately dry, open forests from fairly low (where common) to sub-alpine
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - July
Arnica fulgenshillside arnica, orange arnica, shining leopardbane
Distribution: British Columbia to California, uncommon east to North Dakota; east of the Cascades in Washington and Oregon
Habitat: Open places from the foothills to moderate elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Arnica gracilisslender arnica, slender leopardbane
Distribution: Occurring in mountainous areas throughout Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Colorado and Utah.
Habitat: Rocky places, usually at rather high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
Arnica lanceolataclasping arnica, stream bank arnica
Distribution: Cascades Mountains to the coast in Washington; Alaska to California, east to western Montana.
Habitat: Streambanks and moist woods at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
ssp. prima – clasping arnica, streambank arnica, streambank leopardbane
Arnica latifoliabroad leaved arnica, mountain arnica, daffodil leopardbane
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south through Washington.
Habitat: Common in open forests and open, rocky areas at mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Arnica longifolialongleaf arnica, seep spring arnica, spear-leaf leopardbane
Distribution: Southern Alberta south to Washington, Colorado and California.
Habitat: Rocky soil in seeps or springs, cliffs, or riverbanks, at moderate to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Arnica molliscordilleran arnica, hairy arnica, cordilleran leopardbane
Distribution: In the mountains from British Columbia to California, east to Alberta and Colorado
Habitat: Frequent in moist meadows at mid- to high elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - September
Arnica nevadensisNevada arnica, Sierra arnica, Sierran leopardbane
Distribution: Cascade and Olympic Mountains of Washington, south to California; rare in our range.
Habitat: Open, rocky slopes at high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Arnica ovatasticky arnica, sticky leaf arnica
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Montana and Utah.
Habitat: Rocky places at moderate to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Arnica parryiParry's arnica
Distribution: In the mountains from British Columbia to California, east to Alberta and Colorado
Habitat: Open woods and meadows, moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Arnica rydbergiiRydberg's arnica, subalpine arnica, subalpine leopardbane
Distribution: British Columbia south to northern California, east to Alberta and Colorado.
Habitat: Dry meadows and open slopes at high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Arnica sororiabunch arnica, twin arnica, twin leopardbane
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, east to Wyoming.
Habitat: Open, often rather dry places, but usually vernally moist, in the foothills and at moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Artemisia absinthiumabsinthe, oldman, wormwood
Distribution: Introduced in the northern half of the United States and southern Canada
Habitat: Weed of roadsides and waste places
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July - September
Artemisia annuasweet Annie, sweet sagewort, annual wormwood
Distribution: Native of Eurasia, naturalized in eastern United States, rare in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Fields and waste places.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August - October
Artemisia arbusculadwarf sagebrush, low sagebrush
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; Pacific Northwest, east into Montana
Habitat: Open, dry plains and hills at moderate to high elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
ssp. arbuscula – little sagebrush, low sagebrush
Artemisia biennisbiennial wormwood
Distribution: Native in the Pacific Northwest, but widely distributed elsewhere as a weed.
Habitat: Waste places and streambanks, especially in sandy soil.
Origin: Native? Disputed native (BC) or introduced (Chambers and Sundberg 2000)
Flowers: August - October
Artemisia campestrisPacific sagewort, northern wormwood
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout most of Washington.
Habitat: Open places, often in sandy soil.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
var. scouleriana – Pacific sagewort, Scouler's wormwood
var. wormskioldii – Columbia Islands sagewort, Wormskiold's wormwood sagewort
Artemisia canahoary sagebrush, silver sagebrush
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and northern Great Plains.
Habitat: Meadows and forest openings from valley bottoms to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Artemisia douglasianaDouglas mugwort, Douglas sagewort, Douglas wormwood
Distribution: Occurring in Washington chiefly east of the Cascades crest, but also on the west side; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Mostly along stream banks and river bottoms.
Origin: Native
Flowers: August-September
Artemisia dracunculusdragon sagewort, tarragon, dragon wormwood
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout the central and western portions of North America.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe to dry, open areas at mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
Artemisia frigidaprairie sagebrush, prairie sagewort
Distribution: Rocky Mountains and Great Plains states, occasionally in eastern Washington and British Columbia
Habitat: Dry, open plains and foothills
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Artemisia furcatathree-forked mugwort, forked wormwood, three-forked wormwood
Distribution: Occurring in the Cascades and Olympic Mountains of Washington; Alaska south to Washington, east to Northwest Territories, Alberta, and Nunavut.
Habitat: Open, rocky ledges and talus slopes at high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Artemisia ludovicianawestern mugwort, prairie sage
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; distributed widely throughout North America.
Habitat: Fairly dry areas from the foothills to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-October
ssp. candicans – gray sagewort
ssp. incompta – intermediate sagewort, mountain wormwood
ssp. ludoviciana – western mugwort, Louisiana sagewort, silver wormwood
Artemisia michauxianaMichaux's mugwort, lemon sagewort, Michaux's wormwood
Distribution: British Columbia to California, east to Alberta and Wyoming.
Habitat: Rocky places in the mountains at rather high elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - August
Artemisia norvegicamountain sagewort, boreal wormwood
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Subalpine and alpine areas, typically where moist.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
ssp. saxatilis – mountain sagewort
Artemisia rigidascabland sagebrush, stiff sagebrush
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Dry, rocky places from the plains and foothills to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: September-October
Artemisia spiciformissnowfield sagebrush, spiked sagebrush
Origin: Native
Artemisia stellerianadusty miller, oldwoman, beach wormwood, Steller's wormwood
Distribution: Known from a few locations along the north coast in Washington; known only from Washington in western North America; central Canada and U.S. to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Coastal dunes and beaches.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-September
Artemisia suksdorfiicoastal mugwort, Suksdorf's sagewort, coastal wormwood
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington, British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Bluffs and rocky or sandy beaches, less commonly in other low, open places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Artemisia tilesiiAleutian mugwort, Cascade wormwood
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympic and Cascade Mountains of Washington; Alaska to Oregon, east to Montana and across Canada.
Habitat: Open rocky or gravelly, wet or dry sites, mostly at high elevations in the mountains, descending to sea level northward.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Artemisia tridentatabig sagebrush
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and northern Great Plains.
Habitat: Dry plains and hills up to timberline, but not in lithosol or alkaline soil.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
ssp. tridentata – big sagebrush
ssp. vaseyana – mountain big sagebrush, Vasey sagebrush
ssp. wyomingensis – Wyoming sagebrush
Artemisia tripartitacut-leaf sagebrush, threetip sagebrush
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Sagebrush-steppe grasslands and desert.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
ssp. tripartita – cutleaf sagebrush, threetip sagebrush
Artemisia vulgarismugwort, lobed wormwood
Distribution: Introduced from Europe, now established in most of eastern United States and adjacent Canada; uncommon in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Waste areas and disturbed soil.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August - October
Askellia pygmaealow hawksbeard
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympic and Cascades mountains in Washington; Alaska to California, east to Nunavut, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming, and CO; northeastern North America; Asia.
Habitat: Uncommon above timberline in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Baccharis pilularischaparral broom, coyote brush
Distribution: In Washington, known only from Pacific County; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Coastal dunes, bluffs, and thickets.
Origin: Native
Flowers: August-September
ssp. consanguinea – chaparral broom
Balsamorhiza ×bonserihybrid balsamroot
Distribution: Local in eastern Washington where Balsamorhiza rosea is found
Habitat: Dry, rocky slopes at low elevation
Origin: Native
Balsamorhiza careyanaCarey's balsamroot
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern British Columbia to central Oregon.
Habitat: Open places, but not on lithosol, in the plains, foothills, and lower mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-July
Balsamorhiza careyana × Balsamorhiza hookerihybrid balsamroot
Origin: Native
Balsamorhiza deltoideadeltoid balsamroot, Puget balsamroot
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Prairies and other open areas at low elevations, mostly in the Puget Sound trough.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-July
Balsamorhiza hookerihairy balsamroot, hare's head balsamroot, Hooker's balsamroot
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Montana, Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Dry, open areas at low to moderate elevations, usually in lithosol (rocky, cobbly soil).
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Balsamorhiza hookeri × Balsamorhiza sagittatahybrid balsamroot
Origin: Native
Balsamorhiza incanahoary balsamroot, woolly balsamroot
Distribution: Southeast Washington and northeast Oregon, east through Idaho to Montana and Wyoming
Habitat: Meadows and other moderately moist open places at moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late May Early July
Balsamorhiza rosearosy balsamroot
Distribution: Occasional in Eastern Washington
Habitat: Dry, rocky slopes at low elevation
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - May
Balsamorhiza sagittataarrowleaf balsamroot
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and northern Great Plains.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe, grasslands, and other open areas at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Balsamorhiza serrataserrrate balsamroot, toothed balsamroot
Distribution: Occurring primarily in south-central and southeastern Washington; Washington south to Oregon.
Habitat: Rock outcrops and dry, rocky knolls.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Balsamorhiza ×terebinthaceawormwood balsamroot
Origin: Native
Balsamorhiza ×tomentosawooly hybrid balsamroot
Origin: Native
Bellis perennisEnglish daisy, lawn daisy
Distribution: Introduced throughout the United States; chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington and Oregon
Habitat: Lawns and cultivated areas, usually where moist
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: March - September
Bidens amplissimaVancouver Island beggar ticks
Distribution: Vancouver Island, British Columbia, and Snohomish County, Washington.
Habitat: Wet places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - October
Bidens beckiiBeck's water marigold
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to Oregon, east across northern U.S. and Canada to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Lowland ponds and lakes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Bidens cernuabur marigold, nodding beggar ticks
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Stream banks, pond and lake edges, and other wet places at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Bidens connataswamp beggar ticks
Origin: Introduced from eastern North America
Bidens frondosaleafy beggarticks, devil's pitchfork, sticktight
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of Washington; widely distributed throughout North America except Alaska and northernmost Canada.
Habitat: Wet areas at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-October
Bidens tripartitathree lobed beggarticks
Distribution: Introduced in most of the United States, but uncommon in our area.
Habitat: Wet waste places, primarily at low elevtions.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August - October
Bidens vulgatatall beggarticks, western sticktight
Distribution: Distributed widely throughout Washington; British Columbia east to Nova Scotia, and southward throughout much of the U.S.
Habitat: Streamsides, ponds, lakes, ditches and other moist to wet waste places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
Blepharipappus scaberblepharipappus, rough eyelashweed
Distribution: Occurring in southeastern Washington; adjacent Idaho, south through eastern Oregon to California and northwest Nevada.
Habitat: Bunchgrass prairies and grassy foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Boltonia asteroideswhite Doll's-daisy
Origin: Introduced
var. recognita – asterlike boltonia, white doll's-daisy
Brickellia grandifloratasselflower brickellbush, large flowered tasselflower, large flowered thoroughwort
Distribution: Occasional east of the Cascades in Washington and Oregon.
Habitat: Openings in woods at moderate elevations, sometimes in plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
Brickellia microphyllasmall-leaved brickellbush
Origin: Native
Flowers: August - October
var. microphylla – small leaved brickellia
Brickellia oblongifolianarrow-leaved brickellbush, narrow-leaved thoroughwort
Distribution: East of the Cascade summits, southern British Columbia and Montana, south to California and New Mexico.
Habitat: Dry, often rocky places in the foothills and lowlands.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
var. oblongifolia – narrowleaf brickellia
Cacaliopsis nardosmiasilvercrown luina, tall silvercrown
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Meadows and open forests, moderately dry.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Calendula officinalispot marigold
Origin: Introduced
Canadanthus modestusfew flowered aster, great northern aster
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout mountainous areas of Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon, east to Michigan.
Habitat: Streambanks and moist woods at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Carduus acanthoidesplumeless thistle, spiny plumeless thistle
Distribution: Introduced in much of the United States; uncommon in Washington and Idaho
Habitat: Disturbed, dry ground.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July - October
Carduus nutansmusk thistle, nodding thistle
Distribution: Scattered introductions throughout the Pacific Northwest
Habitat: Moderately dry, open areas
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June - October
Carduus pycnocephalusItalian plumeless thistle
Distribution: Known from Clallam County in Washington; Washington to California and Idaho, also in central and eastern U.S.
Habitat: Disturbed, open areas at low elevation.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June-July
ssp. pycnocephalus – Italian plumeless thistle
Carduus tenuiflorusslender flowered thistle, winged plumeless thistle
Distribution: Introduced in western WA; south to California and sparingly introduced in eastern U.S.
Habitat: Disturbed areas at low elevation
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-July
Carthamus tinctoriussafflower
Distribution: Escaped from cultivation in many western and mid-western states.
Habitat: Disturbed sites.
Origin: Introduced from the Mediterranean region, usually a waif
Flowers: May - August
Centaurea benedictablessed thistle
Origin: Introduced
Centaurea calcitrapapurple starthistle, red starthistle
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July - September
Centaurea cyanusbachelor's button, garden cornflower
Distribution: Widespread introductions in the Pacific Northwest
Habitat: Readily established when escaped from cultivation
Origin: Introduced from the Mediterranean region
Flowers: May - October
Centaurea diffusadiffuse knapweed, tumble knapweed, white knapweed
Distribution: Introduced throughout the Pacific Northwest; widespread and common in eastern Washington
Habitat: Noxious weed of dry, disturbed areas
Origin: Introduced from the eastern Mediterranean region
Flowers: July - September
Centaurea ×gerstlauerihybrid knapweed, meadow knapweed, protean knapweed
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia to California, east to Idaho and Montana; also in eastern North America.
Habitat: Open ground, often where disturbed.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-August
Centaurea ibericaIberian knapweed, Iberian starthistle
Origin: Introduced
Centaurea jaceabrown knapweed, brownray knapweed
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July - October
Centaurea macrocephalaglobe knapweed
Distribution: Sparingly introduced in Washington
Habitat: Occasionally escapes from cultivation
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June - September
Centaurea melitensisMaltese starthistle, tocalote
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California and Mexicos, east to Texas and eastern North America.
Habitat: Roadsides and waste places.
Origin: Introduced from the Mediterranean region
Flowers: June-September
Centaurea montanamountain bluet, mountain cornflower, montane starthistle
Distribution: In scattered locations throughout Washington, but more common west of the Cascades; British Columbia to Oregon, east to Montana and Utah; in upper midwestern and northeastern U.S. and Canada.
Habitat: Occasionally escapes from cultivation; open, disturbed areas in shrub-steppe, forests, and along roadsides.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May-August
Centaurea nigrahardheads, black knapweed, lesser knapweed
Distribution: Introduced in the Pacific Northwest and northeastern United States
Habitat: Uncommon weed in disturbed soil
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July - October
Centaurea nigrescensshort fringed knapweed, Tyrol knapweed
Distribution: Introduced and widely distributed in northeast United States and southeast Canada; occasional in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Fields, roadsides and waste places.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July - October
Centaurea solstitialisyellow starthistle, St. Barnaby's thistle
Distribution: Introduced in most of the United States; chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington and Oregon
Habitat: Noxious weed of dry, disturbed areas
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July - September
Centaurea stoebespotted knapweed
Distribution: Widely established throughout Washington; occurring throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Fields, roadasides, and waste areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-October
ssp. australis – spotted knapweed
Centaurea trichocephalafeatherhead knapweed
Origin: Introduced
Centaurea ×varnensishybrid diffuse knapweed, sand knapweed
Origin: Introduced
Centromadia pungenscommon spikeweed
Distribution: Known from central and southeastern Washington; Native in California; Washington south to California, east to Idaho, Nevada, and Arizona.
Habitat: Roadsides, fields and waste places.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-Sept.
ssp. pungens – common spikeweed, western spikeweed
Chaenactis douglasiihoary chaenactis, hoary false-yarrow
Distribution: East of the Cascade crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe and foothills to higher elevations in forest openings.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-September
var. douglasii – dustymaidens, hoary false yarrow
Chaenactis thompsoniiThompson's pincushion
Distribution: Occurring primarily in the serpentine slopes of the Wenatchee Mountains in Washington.
Habitat: Open, usually rocky areas, at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Chondrilla junceahogbite, rush skeletonweed, gum succory
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California and east to Montana; also occurring in eastern North America.
Habitat: Dry, light soil, rangeland and roadsides.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: July-September
Chrysothamnus humilisTruckee green rabbitbrush, Truckee rabbitbrush
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe, grasslands, and sites with alkaline soils.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Chrysothamnus viscidiflorusgreen rabbit-brush
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Montana and New Mexico.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe, dry foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
ssp. lanceolatus – green rabbitbrush, lanceleaf green rabbitbrush, sticky-leaf rabbitbrush, yellow rabbitbrush
ssp. viscidiflorus – sticky flowered rabbitbrush, sticky-leaf rabbitbrush, yellow rabbitbrush
Cichorium intybuschicory, wild succory
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout most of Washington; widely distributed throughout most of North America.
Habitat: Dry to moist soil, pastures, roadsides, and other disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July-October
Cirsium arvenseCanada thistle, Canadian thistle, creepiing thistle
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Noxious weed that thrives in a variety of habitats.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: June-October
Cirsium brevifoliumPalouse thistle
Distribution: Southeast Washington, northeast Oregon and adjacent Idaho
Habitat: Grasslands at low elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - October
Cirsium brevistylumclustered thistle, short styled thistle
Distribution: British Columbia to northern California, east to Montana
Habitat: Moist places at low to moderate elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Cirsium eduleedible thistle
Distribution: British Columbia to Oregon, from the coast to the east slope of the Cascades
Habitat: In forest openings from low elevations near the coast to mid-elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
var. edule – edible thistle, Indian thistle, Macoun's thistle
var. wenatchense – Wenatchee thistle
Cirsium flodmaniiFlodman's thistle
Origin: Native
Cirsium foliosumleafy thistle
Origin: Native
Cirsium hookerianumHooker's thistle, white thistle
Distribution: East of the Cascades, British Columbia and Washington, east to Alberta and Montana
Habitat: Moist lowlands, open slopes and fields
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Cirsium inamoenumGreene's thistle
Origin: Native
var. inamoenum – Greene's thistle
Cirsium remotifoliumfewleaf thistle, remote-leaved thistle
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - September
Cirsium scariosumelk thistle, meadow thistle
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Moist meadows in the foothills to fairly high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Cirsium undulatumwavy leaf thistle
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Michigan and Texas.
Habitat: Dry hillsides and plains at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-September
Cirsium vulgarebull thistle, common thistle
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout the United States and Canada.
Habitat: Common weed from the lowlands to logged areas in the mountains.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: July-September
Columbiadoria halliiColumbia River daisy, Hall's goldenweed
Distribution: Occurring in the south-central region of Washington; Washington south to Oregon.
Habitat: Dry, open or sparsely wooded slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: August-October
Conyza bonariensisSouth American conyza
Distribution: Introduced from Oregon through Arizona and Texas to Florida
Habitat: Occasionally escapes from cultivation
Origin: Introduced
Conyza canadensisCanadian fleabane, horseweed
Distribution: Common introduction throughout the United States and Canada
Habitat: Weed of roadsides, dry or moist disturbed ground
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Conyza sumatrensisasthmaweed
Origin: Introduced
Coreopsis grandiflorabigleaf tickseed
Origin: Introduced
Coreopsis lanceolatalance-leaved tickseed
Origin: Introduced
Coreopsis tinctoriacalliopsis, Columbia coreopsis, golden tickseed
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America except at northernmost latitudes.
Habitat: Open and disturbed areas at low to mid elevations where seasonally moist.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Cota austriacaAustrian chamomile
Distribution: Known only from near Pullman in Whitman County.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, fields, roadsides.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-August
Cota tinctoriagolden chamomile, yellow chamomile, golden marguerite, Golden marguerite
Distribution: In scattered locations in Washington; widely distributed across northern half of North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, often where dry.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-September
Cota triumfettii
Origin: Introduced
Cotula coronopifoliabrass buttons, common brass buttons
Distribution: Introduced along the coast of the Pacific states, occasionally inland
Habitat: Chiefly in tidal flats; occasionally in other moist areas
Origin: Introduced from South Africa
Flowers: June - September
Crepis acuminatalong leaved hawksbeard, tapertip hawksbeard
Distribution: East of the Cascades, Washington to California, east to Montana and New Mexico.
Habitat: Dry, open places from the foothiils to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Crepis atribarbaslender hawksbeard
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Nevada, east to the Great Plains of Canada and the U.S.
Habitat: Dry, open places, foothills to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Crepis bakeriBaker's hawksbeard
Distribution: East slope of the Cascades, from central Washington to central California.
Habitat: Dry, open slopes in the foothills and at moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May
Crepis barbigerabearded hawksbeard
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Dry, open areas in the plains and foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Crepis capillarissmooth hawksbeard
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Disturbed soil at lower elevations.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May-November
Crepis intermediagray hawksbeard intermediate hawksbeard, limestone hawksbeard
Distribution: British Columbia to California, east to Montana and Arizona
Habitat: Somewhat moist to dry open areas, foothills to moderate elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Crepis modocensislow hawksbeard, Modoc hawksbeard
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon.
Habitat: Common in shrub-steppe, sagebrush, and forest openings.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Crepis nicaeensisFrench hawksbeard, Turkish hawksbeard
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Crepis occidentaliswestern hawksbeard
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern British Columbia to California, east to the Great Plains of Canada and the U.S.
Habitat: Dry, open places, mostly in the foothills and plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Crepis pleurocarpanaked stemmed hawksbeard
Distribution: In eastern portion of Washington; south to California, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Stream banks in mixed conifer forests, road cuts, and rocky, serpentine soils.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Crepis runcinatadandelion hawksbeard, meadow hawksbeard
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
ssp. runcinata – dandelion hawksbeard, meadow hawksbeard
Crepis setosabristly hawksbeard, rough hawksbeard
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington, south to California
Habitat: Disturbed areas at low elevation
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-August
Crepis tectorumannual hawksbeard, narrow leaf hawksbeard, rooftop hawksbeard
Distribution: Introduced from Alaska to California, and across much of the northern half on the United States
Habitat: Uncommon in lawns and wastelands
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June - July
Crocidium multicaulespring gold, gold star
Distribution: Occurring on both sides the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Dry, open areas at low elevations, especially shrub-steppe.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-May
Crupina vulgarisbearded creeper, crupina
Distribution: Introduced in Idaho and Chelan County, Washington
Habitat: Weed or fields and roadsides
Origin: Introduced
Cyclachaena xanthiifoliacarelessweed, burweed marsh elder, tall marsh elder
Distribution: Eastern Washington south to New Mexico, east to Alberta and Texas.
Habitat: Bottom land and moist waste places.
Origin: Introduced?
Flowers: August - October
Dieteria canescenshoary-aster
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; southern British Columbia to southern California, east to Saskatchewan and Arizona.
Habitat: Dry, open places in the plains and foothills, occasionally extending into the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
var. incana – tall hoary aster, hoary-aster
Doronicum pardalianchesgreat leopard's-bane
Distribution: Known from Skamania County in Washington; southwestern British Columbia to Portland Oregon.
Habitat: Disturbed, open, generally moist soil
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: March-November
Eatonella niveawhite Eatonella, white false tickhead
Distribution: Southeast Idaho and southwest Oregon, to Nevada and California; disjunct to central Washington near the Columbia River.
Habitat: Dry, sandy or volcanic desert areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Echinops exaltatustall globe thistle
Origin: Introduced
Echinops ritrosouthern globe-thistle
Origin: Introduced
ssp. ruthenicus – southern globe thistle
Echinops sphaerocephalusgreat globe thistle
Origin: Introduced
Erechtites glomeratuscut leaf burnweed, New Zealand burnweed, Australian fireweed
Origin: Introduced
Erechtites hieraciifoliuseastern burnweed, eastern fireweed
Distribution: Occasionally introduced west of the Cascades, British Columbia to Oregon
Habitat: Roadside weed
Origin: Native in eastern United States
Flowers: August - September
var. hieraciifolius – American burnweed
Erechtites minimusAustralian bornweed, toothed coast burnweed
Origin: Introduced
Ericameria bloomerirabbitbush heath goldenrod, rabbitbrush goldenweed
Distribution: Southern British Columbia and northeast Washington, south in the Cascades and the mountains of eastern Oregon to California.
Habitat: Dry, rocky slopes and open woods, from the foothills to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Ericameria greeneiGreene's heath goldenrod, Greene's goldenweed
Distribution: East of the Cascade crest in Washington; from northern Washington to California, and in the Wallowa Mountains of Oregon.
Habitat: Open or sparsely wooded slopes at rather high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Ericameria nauseosacommon rabbit-brush
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia to Oregon, east to Montana.
Habitat: Dry, open areas from the plains to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: August-September
var. nana – little rabbitbrush
var. speciosa – rubber rabbitbrush
Ericameria resinosaColumbian heath goldenrod, Columbia goldenweed
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Basalt cliffs and rock crevices in the plains and foothills, extending up to 6000 feet on the east slope of the Cascades.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Erigeron acris
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to South Dakota.
Habitat: Mid- to high elevations in mountain meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
var. kamtschaticus – bitter fleabane
Erigeron aliceaeEastwood's daisy, Alice's fleabane
Distribution: In the Olympic Mountains of Washington, in the Cascades of Oregon, and in the Siskiyou Mountains of Oregon and California.
Habitat: Moist to fairly dry, sandy, open areas at mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Erigeron annuussweet scabrous erigeron, annual fleabane, eastern daisy fleabane
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; native to eastern North America and widely introduced in other areas of North America.
Habitat: Weed of moist, disturbed soil.
Origin: Native? Introduced in OR, status as a native in BC uncertain
Flowers: June-September
Erigeron aureusgolden daisy, golden fleabane
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to Washington, east to Alberta.
Habitat: Exposed rocky areas, cliffs, and ridges, often at high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August.
Erigeron basalticusbasalt fleabane
Distribution: Selah Creek area and north in the Yakima River canyon, Yakima and Kittitas Counties, Washington.
Habitat: Cliff crevices in rocky canyons.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-October
Erigeron bloomeriscabland fleabane
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades, central Washington to California, east to Idaho and Nevada
Habitat: Dry, open, rocky areas at low to moderate elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
var. bloomeri – bloomer's daisy, scabland fleabane
Erigeron caespitosustufted daisy, tufted fleabane
Distribution: Alaska and Yukon to eastern Washington and Idaho, south to Arizona.
Habitat: Dry, open, and often rocky places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Erigeron chrysopsidisgolden daisy, dwarf yellow fleabane
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascade Mountains crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe to open slopes of forests at middle elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
var. chrysopsidis – golden daisy, dwarf yellow fleabane, golden fleabane
Erigeron composituscutleaf daisy, dwarf mountain fleabane, fernleaf fleabane, trifid mountain fleabane
Distribution: British Columbia to Oregon, east to Montana
Habitat: Sandy riverbanks at low elevations to rocky outcrops at mid- to high elevation in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - August
Erigeron corymbosusfoothill daisy, longleaf fleabane
Distribution: Cheifly east of the Cascades, southern British Columbia to eastern Oregon, east to Montana and Wyoming.
Habitat: Open, usually dry places, often among sagebrush.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Erigeron davisiiDavis's daisy, Davis's fleabane
Origin: Native
Erigeron disparipilusSnake River daisy, white cushion fleabane
Distribution: Near the Snake River from extreme southeast Washington to Owyhee County, Idaho
Habitat: Dry, rocky hillsides
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Erigeron divergensdiffuse daisy, spreading fleabane
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Great Plains of the U.S.
Habitat: Meadows, grasslands, riverbanks, and forest openings from low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Erigeron eatoniiEaton's daisy
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades, central Washington south to California and Arizona and east to Wyoming.
Habitat: Open places in the mountains and foothills.
Origin: Native
var. villosus – Eaton's shaggy daisy, Eaton's shaggy fleabane
Erigeron elatusswamp fleabane
Distribution: Occurring in north-central region of Washington; Alaska south to Washington, east across Canada to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Wet meadows, edges of ponds, forested wetlands.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Erigeron elegantulusvolcanic daisy, blue dwarf fleabane
Origin: Native
Erigeron filifoliusPeck's threadleaf fleabane
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades, British Columbia to Oregon, east to Montana
Habitat: In shrub-steppe of foothills and plains, often with sagebrush
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Erigeron flettiiFlett's fleabane, Olympic Mt. fleabane
Distribution: Olympic Mountains of Washington at high elevations.
Habitat: Cliffs and other rocky places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Erigeron glacialisglacier fleabane
Distribution: Widely distributed in the mountains throughout Washington; Alaska to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Moist, open areas at mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
var. glacialis – peregrine fleabane
Erigeron grandifloruslarge-flowered fleabane
Origin: Native
Erigeron howelliiHowell's daisy, Howell's fleabane
Distribution: Soouth side of the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon and Skamania County, Washington
Habitat: Moist, rocky places in the lowlands.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - June
Erigeron inornatusCalifornia rayless daisy
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Nevada.
Habitat: Dry slopes and forest openings, often where sandy or rocky.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
var. inornatus – California rayless daisy, unadorned fleabane
Erigeron karvinskianus
Origin: Introduced
Erigeron leibergiiLeiberg's fleabane
Distribution: In the Cascade and Wenatchee Mountains of Okanogan, Chelan and Kittitas Counties; British Columbia south to Washington.
Habitat: Cliffs and rocky places at moderate to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Erigeron linearisdesert yellow daisy, lineleaf fleabane
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; southern British Columbia to Oregon.
Habitat: Dry, open, often rocky areas at low to mid-elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Erigeron lonchophyllusshort rayed daisy, spear leaved fleabane
Distribution: East of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, east to Quebec and North Dakota.
Habitat: Damp meadows and other moist places at high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Erigeron nivalisnorthern daisy
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington;
Habitat: Moist open areas from streambanks to subalpine meadows. Alaska to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Erigeron oreganusgorge daisy, Oregon fleabane
Distribution: Columbia River Gorge, more common on the Oregon side.
Habitat: Moist shady cliffs and ledges.
Origin: Native
Erigeron peregrinuswandering daisy, wandering fleabane
Distribution: Common from Alaska to California, east to Colorado
Habitat: Moist, open areas at mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Erigeron philadelphicusPhiladelphia daisy, Philadelphia fleabane
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Moist, open forests at low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-August
var. philadelphicus – Philadelphia daisy, Philadelphia fleabane
Erigeron piperianusPiper's fleabane
Distribution: Columbia plains of south-central and southeast Washington
Habitat: Dry, open places, often in sandy soil among sagebrush.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Erigeron poliospermushairy-seeded daisy, cushion fleabane
Distribution: East of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Dry, open, often rocky areas at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
var. cereus – Kittitas fleabane
var. poliospermus – hairy seeded daisy, cushion fleabane
Erigeron pumilusshaggy fleabane
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Great Plains.
Habitat: Open places in the foothills, valleys and plains, often among sagebrush.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
var. intermedius – shaggy fleabane
var. pumilus – shaggy fleabane
Erigeron salishiiSalish daisy, star peak fleabane
Distribution: British Columbia and Washington.
Habitat: Cliffs, ridges, ledges and gravelly slopes at mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Erigeron speciosusshowy daisy, triple nerved daisy, showy fleabane, splendid fleabane, triple nerved fleabane
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to Oregon, Nevada, and Arizona, east to the Rocky Mountains and South Dakota.
Habitat: Prairies and forest openings from the lowlands to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Erigeron strigosusbranched daisy, daisy fleabane
Distribution: Widely distributed in Washington; widespread throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Moderately dry places at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-October
var. septentrionalis – prairie fleabane
var. strigosus – branching daisy, daisy fleabane
Erigeron subtrinervisthree-veined fleabane
Distribution: Washington to the Dakotas, south to Colorado, but not found in Oregon
Habitat: Moderately dry, open places at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Eriophyllum lanatumcommon woolly sunflower
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; British Columbia to California, east Montana, Wyoming, and Utah.
Habitat: Dry, open, often rocky areas at low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
var. integrifolium – Oregon sunshine
var. lanatum – common eriophyllum, common wooly sunflower
Eucephalus engelmanniiEngelmann's aster
Distribution: Distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to Nevada, east to Alberta and south to Colorado.
Habitat: Open woods, foothills to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Eucephalus glaucescensKlickitat aster
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; endemic (only occurring in) Washington.
Habitat: Forest openings and meadows at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
Eucephalus ledophyllusCascade aster
Distribution: Cascade Mountains from northern Washington to southern Oregon.
Habitat: Meadows and open woods, mid-elevations up to timberline in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
var. ledophyllus – Cascade aster
Eucephalus paucicapitatusOlympic Mountain aster
Distribution: Olympic Mountains of Washington and Vancouver Island, British Columbia.
Habitat: Open slopes, mid- to high elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Eurybia conspicuashowy aster, western showy aster, eastern showy wood-aster
Distribution: Northeast Oregon and eastern Washington, east to Wyoming and north to Saskatchewan
Habitat: Open woods, foothills to mid-elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Eurybia integrifoliathick stemmed aster
Distribution: Occurring in the northeastern and southeastern regions of Washington; Washington south to California, east to Montana, Wyoming, and Utah.
Habitat: Dry meadows, open coniferous forests, and riparian areas at mid to higher elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Eurybia meritaarctic aster, Behring wood aster, Siberian aster, subalpine aster
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Eurybia radulinarough leaved aster
Distribution: Chiefly on the east side of the Cascades in Washington from low to moderate elevations; south to central California.
Habitat: Open woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Eurybia sibiricaarctic aster, Behring wood aster, Siberian aster, Siberian wood-aster
Distribution: Circumboreal; found in northern Rocky mountains, Pacific Northwest, and northward through Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon and Northwest Territories, and Alaska.
Habitat: In Washington, this species is found in alpine and subalpine meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Euthamia graminifoliafragrant goldenrod, grass leaved goldenrod
Origin: Native
Euthamia occidentaliswestern goldenrod, western goldentop
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains of the U.S.
Habitat: Low, ususally moist ground in the valleys and plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
Eutrochium maculatumspotted Joe-pye weed
Distribution: Known only from Whatcom County in Washington; Southern British Columbia to Washington, east across the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Swamps and other moist, open places, from sea level to the high plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
var. bruneri – joe-pye weed, joepyeweed
Filago arvensisfield cottonrose, cudweed, field filago, field cotton rose
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska to Oregon, east to Sasketchewan, Nebraska, Minnesota and Michigan.
Habitat: Dry, open waste land and overgrazed ranges.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-September
Filago vulgarisGerman filago
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Gaillardia aristatablanket flower, great flowered gaillardia
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon.
Habitat: Dry, open areas at low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-September
Galinsoga parviflora
Distribution: Sparingly introduced in Klickitat County.
Habitat: Waste places
Origin: Introduced from Central and South America
Flowers: June-October
var. parviflora – small flowered galinsoga, gallant soldier
Galinsoga quadriradiataciliate galinsoga, shaggy galinsoga, quickweed, shaggy soldier
Distribution: Introduced and sparingly established in western Washington; occurring throughout most of North America except intermountain west from Idaho to Texas.
Habitat: Gardens and waste places.
Origin: Introduced from Central and South America
Flowers: June-October
Gamochaeta ustulatapurple cudweed, spoon-leaf cudweed
Distribution: Widespread west of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Usually in sandy soil, often in disturbed areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-October
Gnaphalium palustrelowland cudweed, western marsh cudweed
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Great Plains.
Habitat: Open areas at low elevations where moist at least in spring.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-October
Gnaphalium uliginosummarsh cudweed
Distribution: Widespread throughout Washington; Alaska south to Oregon, east across the central U.S. and Canada to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Moist areas, streambanks and waste ground.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-October
Grindelia hirsutulaColumbia gumplant, Oregon gumplant, coastal gumweed, Columbia gumweed, Idaho gumweed, low gumweed, resinweed
Distribution: From the coast to mid elevations; both sides of the Cascades in Washington. British Columbia south to California, east to New York and Quebec.
Habitat: Coastal bluffs, forest openings, alluvial areas, disturbed sites.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-October
Grindelia integrifoliaPuget Sound gumplant, Puget Sound gumweed, Willamette Valley gumweed
Distribution: British Columbia to northern California, along the coast, and in the Puget Trough as far south as the head of Willamette Valley.
Habitat: Salt marshes and rocky shores along the coast, and various non-maritime habitats in the Puget Trough.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - October
Grindelia squarrosacurlycup gumweed, serrate resinweed
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east across southern Canada and most of the United States to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Dry, open, often sandy places, at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-September
Guizotia abyssinica
Distribution: Eastern portion of Washington; California and scattered areas of central and eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed sites at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-September
Gutierrezia sarothraekindlingweed, matchweed, broom snakeweed
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington, chiefly in southeastern part of state; Alberta to Manitoba, south to California and Texas.
Habitat: Dry, open places in the foothills, valleys and plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Helenium autumnalecommon sneezeweed, large flowered sneezeweed, mountain sneezweed
Distribution: British Columbia to Quebec, south to Arizona and Florida
Habitat: Stream banks and other moist, low ground in the valleys and foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Helianthella unifloraRocky Mountain helianthella
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon and Nevada, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Dry, open woods at low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
var. douglasii – Douglas helianthella, false sunflower
Helianthus annuuscommon sunflower
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington, but also on west side where escaped from cultivation.
Habitat: Open, dry to moderately moist soil; foothills, valleys and waste land.
Origin: Native and introduced populations in Washington
Flowers: June-September
Helianthus ciliaris
Origin: Introduced
Helianthus cusickiiCusick's sunflower, turniproot sunflower
Distribution: In Washington, from Chelan County south between the Cascades and the Columbia River, eastern Oregon and adjacent Idaho, and northeastern California.
Habitat: Dry, open plains and foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - August
Helianthus grosseserratussawtooth sunflower
Origin: Introduced from eastern North America along railroads at Bingen and near Spokane
Helianthus maximilianinarrow leaved sunflower
Distribution: Introduced from east of the Rockies to British Columbia, Idaho, and eastern Washington.
Habitat: Dry, open places, often on waste ground.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-September
Helianthus nuttalliiNuttall's sunflower
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades: Western and Mid-western United States and adjacent Canada
Habitat: Meadows and other moist places, low to moderate elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
ssp. nuttallii – cordilleran sunflower, Nuttall's sunflower
Helianthus petiolarisprairie sunflower
Origin: Introduced from further east
Flowers: June - September
Helianthus tuberosusJerusalem artichoke
Distribution: Introdued and widespread in eastern United States; uncommon in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Moist soil and waste places.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August - October
Hemizonella minimasmallhead tarplant, least tarweed, small-head tarweed, smallhead tarweed
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; southern British Columbia south to California, east to northern Idaho.
Habitat: Dry, open ponderosa pine woods and prairies.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Heterotheca oregonaOregon goldenaster
Distribution: British Columbia to California, east base of the Cascades to the coast.
Habitat: Sand and gravel bars along rivers, low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-Sept.
Heterotheca villosahairy goldaster
Distribution: Widespread in Washington and Oregon, chiefly east of the Cascades; east to Michigan
Habitat: Open, sunny areas, often in sandy soil, low to moderate elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
var. foliosa – leafy goldenaster
var. minor – hairy goldenaster, hispid goldenaster
var. villosa – hairy goldaster, hairy goldenaster
Hieracium albiflorumwhite flowered hawkweed, white hawkweed
Distribution: British Columbia to California, east to Colorado
Habitat: Open woods at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Hieracium aurantiacumking devil, orange hawkweed, devil's paintbrush
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east across southern Canada and northern U.S; widely distributed throughout eastern U.S.
Habitat: Moist sites from lowlands to mid-elevations in the mountains, typically where disturbed.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June-August
Hieracium caespitosumyellow king devil, meadow hawkweed
Distribution: Widely distributed on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Washington, east to Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming; also occurring throughout eastern North America.
Habitat: Moist places from the lowlands to moderate elevations in the mountains, usually where the soil has been disturbed.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June-August
Hieracium flagellarewhip hawkweed
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Hieracium ×floribundumflowery hawkweed
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations in lowland western Washington; Washington east to Montana and Wyoming; eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-July
Hieracium glomeratumyellow devil hawkweed
Origin: Introduced
Hieracium lachenaliicommon hawkweed, English hawkweed, European hawkweed
Distribution: Uncommon introduction west of the Cascades in Washington and Oregon
Habitat: Disturbed areas
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June - August
Hieracium longiberbelong bearded hawkweed
Distribution: Columbia River Gorge, Washington and Oregon.
Habitat: Hillsides and rock crevices.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Hieracium maculatummottled hawkweed
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Hieracium murorumwall hawkweed
Distribution: In scattered locations in lowland western Washington; British Columbia south to Washington; occurring throughout northeastern North America.
Habitat: Distrurbed areas and forest edge.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April-June
Hieracium pilosellamouse ear hawkweed
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon; northeastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, forest openings, prairies, meadows, and roadsides.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June-August
Hieracium piloselloidestall hawkweed
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Hieracium sabaudumsavoy hawkweed
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Hieracium scoulerihound tongue hawkweed, Scouler's hawkweed, woolly weed
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; British Columbia south to California, chiefly in the Cascade-Sierra Nevada region.
Habitat: Mostly dry places in open woods, foothills to moderate or sometimes higher elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Hieracium stoloniflorumforked hawkweed
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Hieracium tristealpine hawkweed, slender hawkweed
Distribution: Occurring throughout the mountainous areas in Washington; Alaska south to California, east the Rocky Mountains of Canada and the U.S.
Habitat: Meadows and other open places in the mountains, usually at high elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Hieracium umbellatumnarrowleaf hawkweed, umbellate hawkweed
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to northwest Oregon, east across the northern half of North America to the Atlantic Coast; circumboreal.
Habitat: Moist places in thickets and open woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Hulsea nanadwarf alpinegold, dwarf hulsea
Distribution: Known from the Mt. Rainier and Mt. Adams area in Washington; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Generally around volcanic mountains above timberline.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Hymenopappus filifoliusColumbia cut-leaf, fineleaf hymenopappus
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to the Great Plains of Canada and the U.S.
Habitat: Dry, often sandy places in the foothills and plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
var. filifolius – Columbia cutleaf
Hypochaeris glabrasmooth cat's ear, false dandelion
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California; central and eastern U.S.
Habitat: Rocky balds, disturbed meadows, wasteland areas, especially in sandy soil.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May-June
Hypochaeris radicatahairy cat's ear, rough cat's ear
Distribution: Widely distributed on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains; from the midwestern U.S. to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, grassy balds, prairies, grasslands, lawns, and roadsides.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May-October
Inula heleniumelecampane, inula
Distribution: Introduced as an ornamental and escaped, widespread in moister parts of the United States; west of the Cascades in Oregon and Washington
Habitat: Fields, roadsides and similar waste ground.
Origin: Introduced from western and central Asia
Flowers: June - September
Ionactis stenomeresRocky Mountain ankle-aster, Rocky Mountain aster
Distribution: Southeast British Columbia and northeast Washington, and adjacent Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Open hillsides and forest openings, moderate to fairly high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late June - Early September
Iva axillarisdeeproot, deer root, poverty weed
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Castades, southern British Columbia to California, east to Manitoba and Oklahoma.
Habitat: Dry, often alkaline places, in the valleys, plains and foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - September
Jacobaea maritimasilver ragwort
Origin: Introduced
Jacobaea vulgaristansy ragwort
Distribution: Widely distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho and Montana; eastern North America.
Habitat: A weed of pastures, roadsides, forest edges, and other disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-September
Jaumea carnosafleshy jaumea, marsh jaumea
Distribution: Coastal, southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, to southern California.
Habitat: Tidal flats and marshes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Lactuca biennistall blue lettuce, wild blue lettuce
Distribution: Alaska to Newfoundland, south to California and North Carolina.
Habitat: Moist places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Lactuca canadensisCanadian wild lettuce, Florida blue lettuce
Distribution: Widespread in eastern United States; occasionally introduced in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Fields, woodlands and waste places.
Origin: Introduced from eastern North America
Flowers: July - September
Lactuca ludovicianaLouisiana lettuce, prairie lettuce, western lettuce
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July - September
Lactuca salignaleast lettuce, willow lettuce
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations in Washington; Washington south to California, east across the southwestern U.S. to the central U.S. and northeastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, roadsides, and meadows.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August-October
Lactuca sativagarden lettuce
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho; in scattered locations in the central U.S., more commonly distributed in eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, often escaping from cultivation.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-September
Lactuca serriolaprickly lettuce
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; common and widespread throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Fields and waste places.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July-September
Lactuca tataricablue lettuce
Origin: Native
ssp. pulchella – blue lettuce
Lactuca virosagreat lettuce, tall lettuce, wild lettuce
Distribution: Known from Puget Trough region in Washington; also in California, Mississippi, and Maryland.
Habitat: Disturbed, open areas at low elevations including wastelots and roadsides.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-October
Lagophylla ramosissimaslender hareleaf, common rabbitleaf
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Montana, Idaho, and Nevada.
Habitat: Dry, open areas of foothills and plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Lapsana communiscommon nipplewort
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington, but more often west of the crest; BC to CA, scattered elsewhere in western North America, and more common in central and eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas including roadsides, wastelots, fields, and forest edge.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: June-July
Lasthenia glaberrimasmooth goldfields, smooth lasthenia
Distribution: West of the Cascades, southwest Washington south to central California.
Habitat: Wet or muddy ground at low elevations, including venral pools.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Lasthenia maritimamaritime goldfields, seaside goldfields
Distribution: Coastal southern British Columbia to California.
Habitat: Rocky beaches.
Origin: Native
Lasthenia minorcoastal goldfields
Origin: Native
Layia glandulosawhite layia, white daisy tidytips
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico.
Habitat: Dry, open places in the deserts and foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Leontodon autumnalisautumn hawkbit
Distribution: Known from San Juan and Whatcom counties in Washington; Alaska to Oregon, east to Idaho and Montana; also in eastern North America.
Habitat: Roadsides, pastures, open fields and other disturbed areas primarily in the lowlands, but also found along roads at alpine elevations in the mountains (e.g., Mt. Baker area).
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: July-September
Leontodon saxatilishairy hawkbit
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations in Washington, chiefly west of the Cascades crest; British Columbia south to California, Nevada, and Arizona; central and eastern U.S.
Habitat: Disturbed sites.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-September
ssp. saxatilis – lesser hawkbit
Leucanthemum ×superbumShasta daisy
Origin: Introduced
Leucanthemum vulgareoxeye daisy
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Open, disturbed areas including roadsides, pastures, prairies, grasslands and wastelots.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-October
Logfia gallicadaggerleaf cottonweed
Origin: Introduced
Logfia minimalittle cottonrose, small cudweed
Distribution: Native to northern Europe
Habitat: Heaths, sandy areas
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June-Sept.
Luina hypoleucalittleleaf luina, silverback luina, littleleaf silverback
Distribution: In the Olympic and Cascade mountains in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Open, rocky areas, moist to somewhat dry, moderate to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-October
Lygodesmia juncearush skeletonplant
Distribution: Known from Spokane County in Washington; southeastern British Columbia to eastern Washington, Idaho and Nevada, east to Great Plains and Great Lakes region.
Habitat: Dry, open places, often in sandy soil.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Madia citriodoralemon scented tarplant, lemon scented tarweed, lemon tarweed
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Nevada.
Habitat: Dry, open hillsides and foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Madia eleganscommon madia, autumn showy tarweed
Distribution: Southwest Washington, south through western Oregon to California.
Habitat: Dry, open places, often becoming a roadside weed.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Madia exiguathreadstem madia, little tarplant, little tarweed
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades, southern British Columbia to California, east to northwest Montana and Nevada.
Habitat: Dry, open woods and grasslands, from the plains and foothills, occasionally up to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Madia glomeratamountain tarplant, cluster tarweed, mountain tarweed
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska to south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and across northern U.S. and southern Canada to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Common in dry, open places from the foothills to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Madia gracilisgrassy tarplant, common tarweed, slender tarweed
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana, Idaho, Nevada, and Utah.
Habitat: Dry, open areas from shrub-steppe to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Madia sativaChilean tarplant, coast tarweed
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Dry, open places at low elevations, often along roadsides or other disturbed sites.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Matricaria chamomillawild chamomile, scented mayweed
Distribution: Widespread across the United States and southern Canada.
Habitat: Roadsides, dry waste sites.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: Late April - June
Matricaria discoideapineapple weed
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, moist to dry.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-September
Mauranthemum paludosumannual marguerite
Origin: Introduced
Microseris bigeloviicoast microseris, coastal silverpuffs
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Microseris borealisapargidium, bog microseris, northern silverpuffs
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern Alaska south to northern California.
Habitat: Sphagnum bogs and wet meadows in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Microseris laciniatacut-leaved microseris
Distribution: Washington to California, from the eastern foothills of the Cascades to the coast.
Habitat: Usually in fairly moist meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
ssp. laciniata – cutleaf microseris, cut leaved scorzonella
ssp. leptosepala – cut-leaved silverpuffs, cutleaf silverpuffs
Microseris nutansnodding microseris, nodding scorzonella, nodding silverpuffs
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and South Dakota.
Habitat: Open areas to open forests, somewhat moist places, low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Mycelis muraliswall lettuce
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington, but more common on the west side; British Columbia to Oregon; eastern North America.
Habitat: Roadsides and waste ground from the lowlands to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July-September
Nabalus alatuswestern rattlesnake root
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska, south to Oregon, east to Alberta, Idaho, and Montana.
Habitat: Streambanks and other moist, shaded places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Nestotus stenophyllusnarrowleaf goldenweed
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Dry, rocky soil, often with sagebrush.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Nothocalais alpestrisalpine lake agoseris
Distribution: In the Cascades of Washington, mostly from Mt. Rainier south; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Open slopes and meadows from mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Nothocalais troximoidesweevil prairie dandelion, false agoseris
Distribution: East of the Caascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana, Wyoming and Utah.
Habitat: Dry, open areas in lowlands and foothills, especially in lithosol.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Onopordum acanthiumcotton thistle, Scotch thistle, Scots thistle
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington, but also on the west side; introduced throughout nearly all of North America.
Habitat: Noxious weed of dry, open areas and stream banks.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: June-August
Oreostemma alpigenum
Distribution: Alpine areas of Olympic and Cascade Mountains; British Columbia to California, east to Wyoming.
Habitat: High mountain meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
var. alpigenum – alpine aster, tundra mountaincrown
Packera bolanderiBolander's groundsel
Distribution: Along the coast from the estuary of the Columbia River to California.
Habitat: Bluffs, woodlands and beaches.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
var. bolanderi – Bolander's groundsel, Bolander's ragwort
var. harfordii – Harford's ragwort
Packera canawoolly groundsel
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Saskatchewan and Nebraska.
Habitat: Dry, open, often rocky places, from the foothills to above timberline.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Packera conterminadwarf arctic butterweed
Origin: Native
Packera flettiiFlett's groundsel
Distribution: From the foothills to the tops of the Olympic Mountains in Washington, and also at high elevations in the Cascades in the vicinity of Mount Rainier.
Habitat: Open, rocky places, especilly on talus slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Packera indecorarayless mountain butterweed, elegant groundsel, rayless mountain groundsel
Distribution: Alaska to Washington, east to Montana
Habitat: Uncommon in moist woods and on stream banks, moderate elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Packera macouniiPuget butterweed, long rayed groundsel, Macoun's groundsel, Siskiyou Mountain ragwort
Distribution: West of the Cascades, British Columbia to southern Oregon, mostly in the Puget Trough.
Habitat: Open woods and dry, open places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Packera pauciflorarayless alpine butterweed, rayless alpine groundsel
Distribution: Alaska, east across Canada to Labrador, south to northern Washington and Idaho.
Habitat: Alpine and sub-alpine meadows and moist cliffs.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Packera pauperculaCanadian butterweed, balsam groundsel
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon and New Mexico, east to Labrador and Virginia.
Habitat: Meadows, moist cilffs and woods, foothills to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-October
Packera porteriPorter's groundsel
Origin: Native
Packera pseudaureastreambank butterweed
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to central Canada and midwestern U.S.
Habitat: Wet meadows, stream-banks and moist woodlands at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
var. pseudaurea – streambank butterweed, falsegold groundsel
Packera streptanthifoliaRocky Mountain butterweed, cleftleaf groundsel, Rocky Mountain groundsel
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Colorado
Habitat: Moist to moderately dry open areas and woods, mid- to high elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Packera subnudaalpine meadow butterweed, few-leaved groundsel
Distribution: Occurring in the Cascade Mountains of Washington; Washington south to California, east to Montana and Wyoming.
Habitat: Alpine and subalpine wet meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September.
var. subnuda – cleftleaf groundsel
Petasites frigidus
Distribution: Occurring in forested and mountainous areas throughout Washington; Alaska south to California, east across the northern half of North America to the Atlantic Coast; circumboreal.
Habitat: Wet meadows and damp woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-July
var. frigidus – alpine butterbur, arctic butterbur, sweet coltsfoot
var. palmatus – western coltsfoot
var. sagittatus – arrowhead coltsfoot, arrowhead sweet coltsfoot, arrowleaf coltsfoot
var. ×vitifolius – hybrid coltsfoot, Wenatchee coltsfoot
Petasites japonicusJapanese coltsfoot
Distribution: Sparingly introduced in Washington
Habitat: Escaped from cultivation
Origin: Introduced
var. giganteus – Japanese sweet coltsfoot
var. japonicus – Japanese sweet coltsfoot
Picris hieracioideshawkweed oxtongue
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Pleiacanthus spinosusthorny skeletonweed
Origin: Introduced?
Pseudognaphalium californicumCalifornia cudweed, California everlasting, ladies tobacco, ladies' tobacco
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Pseudognaphalium luteoalbumweedy cudweed, red-tip rabbit-tobacco, jersey rabbit tobacco
Distribution: Locally introduced, chiefly west of the Cascades.
Habitat: Disturbed waste ground.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June - October
Pseudognaphalium macouniisticky cudweed, winded cudweed, Macoun's rabbit-tobacco, Macoun's rabbit tobacco
Origin: Native
Pseudognaphalium stramineumcotton batting cudweed, cotton batting plant
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Great Plains of the U.S.; New York south to South Carolina.
Habitat: Open, usually moist places, often on disturbed soil.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-October
Pseudognaphalium thermaleslender cudweed, northwestern rabbit-tobacco
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washingotn; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Utah.
Habitat: Dry, sandy banks and ditches, open woods of ponderosa pine and Douglas fir, and mixed deciduous forests.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Psilocarphus brevissimusdwarf woolly-marbles
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Dried beds of vernal pools.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
var. brevissimus – dwarf woollyheads
Psilocarphus elatiortall woollyheads
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Dried beds of vernal pools and other open, moist places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Psilocarphus oregonusOregon woollyheads
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Dried beds of vernal pools.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Psilocarphus tenellusslender woollyheads
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Dry or seasonally moist barren or wooded slopes or flats, often on disturbed sites.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-August
Pyrrocoma carthamoideslarge-flowered goldenweed
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada.
Habitat: Open hillsides and meadows, from the valleys and plains to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
var. carthamoides – Columbia goldenweed, rayless goldenweed
var. cusickii – narrowhead goldenweed
Pyrrocoma hirtahairy goldenweed, sticky goldenweed
Distribution: Mountains of central Washington, and the mountains of northeast Oregon and adjacent Washington and Idaho, south to northeast California.
Habitat: Meadows and open or sparsely wooded slopes in the foothills to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
var. sonchifolia – large sticky goldenweed
Pyrrocoma liatriformisPalouse goldenweed
Distribution: Occurring in the Palouse region of southeastern Washington.
Habitat: Grassy hillsides and prairies.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Pyrrocoma scaberulapalouse goldenweed
Distribution: Occurring in the southeastern corner of Washington, northeast Oregon and into Idaho.
Habitat: Grasslands and open hillsides at low to mid elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Rainiera strictatongue leaved luina, Rainiera, false silverback
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in south-central Washington; Washington south to Oregon.
Habitat: Meadows and moist, open hillsides at mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Ratibida columniferaprairie coneflower, redspike Mexican-hat, Upright prairie coneflower
Distribution: Southeast British Columbia and Montana, east to Minnesota and south to Texas.
Habitat: Prairies, plains and waste ground.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-August
Rhaponticum repenshardheads, Russian knapweed, Turkestan thistle
Distribution: Introduced chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Dry, open areas at low elevation and foothills.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-September
Rigiopappus leptocladusbristlehead, false wireweed
Distribution: Pacific Northwest to Utah and California; chiefly east of the Columbia River in Washington
Habitat: Dry, open areas at low elevations; sagebrush and grasslands areas
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - June
Rudbeckia alpicolaor showy coneflower, Wenatchee Mountain, Washington
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Rudbeckia hirta
Distribution: Found in most of the United States, but native in the central states and introduced in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Open meadows and disturbed places.
Origin: Introduced from farther east in United States
Flowers: June - August
var. pulcherrima – blackeyed Susan
Rudbeckia laciniatagreen-headed coneflower, tall coneflower
Distribution: Montana and southern Idaho, east to Quebec, then south to Florida.
Habitat: Streambanks and other moist places.
Origin: Introduced from farther east in United States
Flowers: July - September
var. ampla – tall coneflower
Rudbeckia occidentaliswestern chocolate come, western coneflower
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Moist openings in forests at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Saussurea americanaAmerican sawwort
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympic and Cascade Mountains of Washington; Yukon Territory south to California, east to Alberta, Montana, and Idaho.
Habitat: Meadows and open, often rocky slopes, where moist, at mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Senecio elmeriElmer's ragwort
Distribution: Occurring in the Cascade and Wenatchee Mountains of central and northern Washington; British Columbia south to Washington.
Habitat: Talus slopes and other rocky places in alpine areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Senecio fremontiidwarf mountain butterweed
Distribution: British Columbia to California, east to Colorado
Habitat: Open, rocky slopes at high elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
var. fremontii – dwarf mountain groundsel
Senecio hydrophiloidessweet marsh butterweed, stout meadow groundsel
Distribution: East of the Cascades, Okanogan County and adjacent British Columbia, south to eastern Oregon and east to western Montana.
Habitat: Wet meadows in the mountains and foothills, but not in alkali.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Senecio hydrophilusalkali marsh butterweed, water groundsel, alkali marsh ragwort
Distribution: East of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, east to South Dakota and Colorado.
Habitat: Swampy places in the valleys and foothills; tolerant of alkali.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June- September
Senecio integerrimusone-stemmed butterweed, western groundsel
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout most of Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the central regions of Canada and the U.S.
Habitat: Open areas from the valleys to near timberline.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
var. exaltatus – lambstongue groundsel, tall western groundsel
var. ochroleucus – white western groundsel
Senecio lugensblack-tipped groundsel
Distribution: Alaska and Yukon, south to the Olympic Mountains and the northern mountains in Wyoming; reported in Okanogan County, but otherwise not known in the Cascades.
Habitat: Wet meadows, grassy alpine slopes and rich northern woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Senecio neowebsteriOlympic Mountain ragwort
Distribution: Olympic Mountains of Washington at high elevations.
Habitat: Talus slopes and rocky places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: Aug.-Sept.
Senecio serratall butterweed, butterweed groundsel
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains north of Arizona and New Mexico.
Habitat: Meadows and open, moist hillsides, foothills to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
var. serra – tall butterweed, butterweed groundsel
Senecio sylvaticuswood groundsel, woodland groundsel, woodland ragwort
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to California, also in eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed ground at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May-September
Senecio triangularisarrowleaf groundsel, arrowleaf ragwort
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Moist places and streambanks, moderate to high elevations in the mountains, and low elvations west of the Cascades.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Senecio viscosussticky ragwort
Origin: Introduced
Senecio vulgariscommon groundsel, old man in the spring
Distribution: Introduced throughout the United States; common west of the Cascades in the Pacific Northwest
Habitat: Roadsides, waste ground
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Sericocarpus oregonensisOregon white topped aster
Distribution: Occurring in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Grasslands, forest openings, and savanna.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
ssp. oregonensis – Oregon white topped aster
Sericocarpus rigidusColumbian white-topped aster, Columbian whitetop aster, rigid white topped aster
Distribution: West of the Cascades from southern Vancouver Island, BC, to southwest Oregon, but chiefly in Washington.
Habitat: Prairies and open areas at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Silybum marianummilk thistle
Distribution: Introduced weed now well established in California; occasional at scattered locations in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Waste places.
Origin: Introduced from the Mediterranean region
Flowers: May - July
Solidago elongataCascade Canada goldenrod, West Coast goldenrod
Origin: Native
Solidago lepidawestern Canada goldenrod
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia to Idaho and Nevada, east to the Rocky Mountains and Manitoba.
Habitat: Dry to moist areas in meadows and riparian areas, from low to middle elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
var. lepida – western Canada goldenrod
var. salebrosa – Canada goldenrod, meadow goldenrod, Rocky Mountains Canada goldenrod
Solidago missouriensisMissouri goldenrod
Distribution: Southern British Columbia and western Washington, east to Ontario and Tennesee.
Habitat: Rather dry, open places, from the valleys and plains to fairly high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late June - October
Solidago multiradiatanorthern goldenrod, Rocky Mountain goldenrod
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Colorado
Habitat: Mountain meadows and open slopes at high elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Solidago simplexsticky goldenrod
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympic and Cascade Mountains in Washington; Alaska to California, east to Minnesota and Texas.
Habitat: Open, slightly moist areas from coastal dunes to alpine meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
var. nana – dwarf goldenrod
var. simplex – sticky goldenrod
Soliva sessilislawn burrweed, common soliva, prickly soliva
Distribution: Known from western Washington, Oregon, and British Columbia
Habitat: Disturbed areas, roadsides, lawns
Origin: Introduced from South America
Flowers: May-June
Sonchus arvensisfield sow-thistle, perennial sow-thistle
Distribution: Introduced noxious weed, found across the United States and Canada.
Habitat: Usually in disturbed ground, dry to wet.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July - October
ssp. arvensis – field sow-thistle, corn sow thistle, perennial sow thistle
ssp. uliginosus – field sow-thistle, marsh sow thistle, wet ground sow thistle
Sonchus asperprickly sow thistle, spiny leaf sow thistle
Distribution: Cosmopolitan; common in the Pacific Northwest
Habitat: Disturbed areas, roadsides, gardens
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July - October
Sonchus oleraceuscommon sow thistle
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington, but more common on the west side; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Roadsides and waste ground.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July-October
Stenotus lanuginosuswoolly goldenweed
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho, Montana, and Nevada.
Habitat: Open, dry, often rocky places, foothills to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
var. lanuginosus – woolly goldenweed, woolly stenotus
Stephanomeria exiguasmall wirelettuce
Origin: Native
Stephanomeria paniculatastiff branched stephanomeria, stiff branched wirelettuce
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades in Washington; Oregon and adjacent Idaho, south to California.
Habitat: Dry, open places in the plains and foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Stephanomeria tenuifoliawire lettuce, narrowleaf stephanomeria
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; southern British Columbia south to California, east to Texas and western Montana.
Habitat: Dry, often rocky places, from the foothills and plains to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Symphyotrichum ×amethystinumamethyst aster, hybrid aster
Origin: Introduced
Symphyotrichum ascendensintermountain aster, long leaved aster, long-leaved aster, western American aster, western aster
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and northern Great Plains.
Habitat: Meadows, grasslands, and forest openings, often where moist.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
Symphyotrichum borealenorthern bog aster, rush aster, slender white aster
Distribution: Alaska south to Idaho, east to Minnesota; rare in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Cold bogs.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Symphyotrichum bracteolatumbracted aster, Eaton's aster, Oregon aster
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to California, east to Sasketchewan and Rocky Mountain states.
Habitat: Moist to wet sunny places, wet thickets, along streams and ditches
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Symphyotrichum campestrewestern meadow aster, Western meadow aster
Origin: Native
Symphyotrichum chilensecommon California aster, Pacific aster
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades, Washington to California, east to Montana and New Mexico.
Habitat: Dry, open places in the valleys and plains, to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-October
Symphyotrichum ciliatumalkali American aster, rayless alkali aster, rayless annual aster
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades in northern Washington; British Columbia south to northern Washington, east to Minnesota.
Habitat: Moist, usually saline ground, often along the shores of lakes and ponds.
Origin: Native
Flowers: August-September
Symphyotrichum ×columbianumhybrid aster
Origin: Native
Symphyotrichum ericoidesheath-leaved aster, tufted white prairie aster
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern British Columbia and eastern Washington and Montana, south to Utah, Colorado and Nebraska.
Habitat: Open, wet or dry places in the valleys and plains; tolerant of alkali.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
var. pansum – little gray aster, tufted white prairie aster, white heath aster
Symphyotrichum falcatumrough white prairie aster, western heath aster
Origin: Native
Symphyotrichum foliaceumalpine leafybract aster, Canby's leafybract aster, Cusick's American aster, Cusick's aster, Henderson's aster, Kootenai aster, leafy aster, leafy-bracted aster, Parry's aster
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Colorado
Habitat: Open, usually moist areas, low to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Symphyotrichum frondosumalkali aster, short rayed aster, short-rayed alkali aster
Distribution: Eastern Washington, south to California and east to Wyoming and Utah.
Habitat: Moist, usually saline soil, often along the shores of lakes and ponds, or in vernally moist, alkaline bottoms.
Origin: Native
Flowers: August - October
Symphyotrichum halliiHall's aster
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington and, more commonly, in Oregon.
Habitat: Dry, open places in the valleys and plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - October
Symphyotrichum jessicaeJessica's aster, Palouse aster
Distribution: The Palouse country of southeast Washington and adjacent Idaho.
Habitat: Streambanks and open places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Symphyotrichum laeveGeyer's aster, smooth aster
Distribution: Eastern British Columbia, eastern Washington and northeast Oregon, east to Maine and Georgia.
Habitat: Open places in the plains and valleys to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
var. geyeri – smooth aster
Symphyotrichum lanceolatummarsh aster, western willow aster
Origin: Native
var. hesperium – lance-leaved aster, panicled aster, white panicled aster
Symphyotrichum novae-angliaeNew England aster
Distribution: Native to eastern United States; introduced as an ornamental and occasionally escaping in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Roadsides and disturbed areas where somewhat moist.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-September
Symphyotrichum pilosumhairy aster
Origin: Introduced
Symphyotrichum spathulatumwestern aster, western mountain aster, Western mountain aster
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Meadows and forest openings, moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Symphyotrichum subspicatumDouglas' aster, Douglas's aster
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Alberta, Montana and Idaho.
Habitat: Moist woods, streambanks and seashores.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Tanacetum balsamitacostMary
Distribution: Introduced and escaped over much of the United States; not common in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Roadsides and other waste places.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August - September
Tanacetum bipinnatumcamphor tansy, dune tansy
Distribution: British Columbia to northern California.
Habitat: Sand dunes along the coast.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - September
Tanacetum partheniumfeatherfew, feverfew
Distribution: Scattered locations throughout Washington; introduced in most of the western and eastern United States; escaped from gardens.
Habitat: Waste places.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June-September
Tanacetum vulgarecommon tansy
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Roadsides and waste ground, often cultivated and escaped
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: July-October
Taraxacum ceratophorumhorned dandelion
Origin: Native
Taraxacum erythrospermumred-seeded dandelion
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Meadows, grasslands, prairies, and other open areas, typically where some level of disturbance present.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April-October
Taraxacum officinalecommon dandelion
Distribution: Occurring throughout Washington; introduced throughout North America.
Habitat: Common in disturbed areas, fields, lawns, from the coast to the alpine.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: March-October
Tetradymia canescensgray horsebrush, spineless horsebrush
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern British Columbia to California, east to Montana and New Mexico.
Habitat: Dry, open places in the foothills and plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Tonestus lyalliiLyall's goldenweed, Lyall's serpentweed
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympics and Cascades mountains in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Alberta, south to Colorado.
Habitat: Mountain meadows and rocky slopes, alpine and subalpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Townsendia florifershowy Townsend-daisy, showy townsendia
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon and Nevada, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Dry-open places in the plains and foothills, often with sagebrush.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Tragopogon dubiusmeadow goatsbeard, yellow salsify
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout most of North America.
Habitat: Drier areas at low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May-Juyly
Tragopogon floccosuswoolly goatsbeard
Distribution: Known only from Whitman County in Washington.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, fields, roadsides.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-August
Tragopogon mirusremarkable goatsbeard
Distribution: Known only from one colony at Pullman, Washington, and another at nearby Palouse.
Habitat: Dry, open areas in the foothills.
Origin: Native
Tragopogon miscellushybrid goatsbeard
Origin: Native
Tragopogon porrifoliusoyster plant, purple salsify
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout most of North America.
Habitat: Roadsides, fields and waste places, usually where moist.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April-August
Tragopogon pratensisjack go to bed at noon, meadow salsify
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Roadsides, fields and waste places, usually in slightly moist areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-August
Tripleurospermum inodorumfalse chamomile, false mayweed, scentless mayweed
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout northern 2/3 of North America.
Habitat: Noxious weed in fields and waste ground in eastern Washington
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June-September
Tussilago farfaracoltsfoot
Distribution: In scattered locations in western Washington; widespread in eastern North America.
Habitat: Waste ground, disturbed forest understory, and near areas of garden cultivation.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: March-May
Uropappus lindleyilinearleaf microseris, silver puffs, Lindley's false silverpuffs
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho, south to Texas.
Habitat: Open hillsides, forest openings, from low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-May
Wyethia amplexicaulisnorthern mule's ears, smooth dwarf sunflower
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to Nevada, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Slightly moist spots in the shrub-steppe, to open areas at mid-elevation.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Wyethia angustifoliaCalifornia compassplant, narrow leaved mule's ears, narrowleaf wyethia
Distribution: Occurring in southwestern Washington and in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Meadows and moist, open hillsides at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Xanthium spinosumspiny clotbur, spiny cockleburr
Origin: Introduced from South America (although treated as native in CA by Jeps. Man.)
Flowers: July - October
Xanthium strumariumCanada cocklebur, common cocklebur
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout most of North America.
Habitat: Fields, waste places, flood lanes and lake beaches.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-October