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Family = Caryophyllaceae,

Displaying matches 1 - 50 of 78. Next page.
Agrostemma githago   (common corncockle)  
(= Agrostemma githago in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
White-hairy annual from a taproot, the simple to freely-branched stem up to 10 dm. tall.
Distribution: Introduced and well established in Washington; also occurring in Oregon, less common in Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Roadsides and wasteland.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Arenaria serpyllifolia   (thyme-leaf sandwort)  
(= Arenaria serpyllifolia in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Rough-hairy annual, glandular above, the 1-several slender stems erect to ascending, simple to freely-branched, 10-30 cm. tall.
Distribution: Widely distributed across Washington; introduced in most of North America.
Habitat: Weed in various habitats.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Cardionema ramosissima   (sandmat)  
Prostrate, matted perennial, the stems up to 3 dm. long, pubescent, usually covered at the base with old, dead leaves and stipules.
Distribution: Along the coast in Washington; south to Mexico.
Habitat: Sandy beaches along the coast.
Origin: Native

Cerastium arvense   (field chickweed)  
(= Cerastium arvense in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Tufted perennial, often forming loose mats to 4 dm. broad, glabrous to glandular-pubescent, the flowering stems 5-50 cm. tall.
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades and in the Blue Mountains in Washington. Widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Coastal cliffs to inland valleys, rocky hillsides, subalpine meadows.
Origin: Native

Cerastium beeringianum   (Bering chickweed, alpine chickweed)  
(= Cerastium berringianum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Tufted, matted perennial with clumps up to 15 cm. broad, glandular-pubescent with spreading hairs; flowering stems numerous from trailing shoots, up to 25 cm. tall.
Distribution: Occurring in the Cascade Mountains in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains in the U.S.; east across Canada to the Atlantic coast.
Habitat: Alpine zone, mostly in cirques or on talus.
Origin: Native

Cerastium brachypetalum   
Origin: Native

Cerastium dichotomum   (dry chickweed)  
Glandular annual from a taproot and crown, the stems erect, simple or several from the base, 15-30 cm. tall.
Distribution: Washington to California.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, especially along roadsides.
Origin: Introduced

Cerastium fontanum   (common mouse-ear chickweed)  
(= Cerastium vulgatum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Stiff-hairy, glandular biennial or perennial, the stems sprawling but the flowering stems erect, 2-4 dm. tall.
Distribution: Introduced and common in most of Canada and the United States; more common east of the Cascades
Habitat: Disturbed ground, lawns and gardens
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Cerastium glomeratum   (sticky chickweed, sticky mouse-ear chickweed)  
(= Cerastium viscosum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Copiously glandular-pubescent annual, the 1-several erect to decumbent stems branched, 1-3 dm. long.
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington, but more common west of the Cascades crest; occurring throughout western and eastern North America.
Habitat: Low elevations in disturbed ground.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Cerastium nutans   (nodding chickweed)  
(= Cerastium nutans in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glandular-pubescent annual with 1 to several simple or basally branched, decumbent to erect stems 5-20 cm. long.
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to Oregon, south in the Rocky Mountains to New Mexico and Arizona, east to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Dry to moist banks and woodlands.
Origin: Native

Cerastium pumilum   (European chickweed)  
(taxon is not treated in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Annuals with taproots, the stems erect or ascending, branched near the base, 2-12 cm. tall, covered with glandular and non-glandular hairs.
Distribution: Introduced at scattered locations in Washngton.
Habitat: Dry, sandy or gravelly places, roadsides.
Origin: Introduced

Cerastium semidecandrum   (little mouse ear, little chickweed)  
Origin: Introduced

Cerastium tomentosum   (snow-in-summer)  
(taxon is not treated in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Rhizomatous, mat-forming perennials, the flowering stems ascending, branched, 15-40 cm. long; non-flowering stems prostrate, readily rooting; herbage densely white-woolly.
Distribution: Occasionally escaping cultivation in lowland northwestern Washington; British Columbia to Oregon, east across northern U.S. and southern Canada to Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Fields, roadsides, waste sites.
Origin: Introduced

Cherleria biflora   (two-flowered sandwort)  
Origin: Native

Corrigiola litoralis   (strapwort)  
Mostly sprawling, glabrous to glaucous annual or biennial to 50 cm.
Distribution: Southern British Columbia south to Oregon; also in Maryland.
Habitat: Lake and pond margins, often where disturbed.
Origin: Introduced

Dianthus armeria   (Deptford pink)  
(= Dianthus armeria in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Usually glabrous annual or biennial, the stems stiffly erect, 2-6 dm. tall.
Distribution: Introduced in most of the United States
Habitat: Escaped from gardens
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Dianthus barbatus   (sweetwilliam)  
(= Dianthus barbatus in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glabrous perennial with several erect to decumbent-based stems 2-6 dm. tall.
Distribution: Introduced ornamental that occastionally escapes in western Washington and Oregon.
Habitat: Wasteland and disturbed soil.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Eremogone aculeata   (prickly sandwort)  
Tufted perennial from a freely-branched, woody base, forming mats 5-15 cm. broad; flowering stems numerous, 10-20 cm. tall, glandular-pubescent with dark-tipped hairs.
Distribution: Known from Kittitas County in Washington; Beaverhead County, Montana, to northeast Oregon, south to Nevada, Utah, and northeast California.
Habitat: Gravelly sagebrush-covered hills at 6000 feet elevation to rocky alpine slopes.
Origin: Native

Eremogone capillaris   (fescue sandwort)  
Tufted, glaucous perennial from a branched crown, usually glabrous below and glandular-pubescent above, the numerous flowering stems 5-30 cm. tall.
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to northern Oregon and northern Nevada, east to Alberta and Montana.
Habitat: Sagebrush plains to rocky subalpine slopes.
Origin: Native

Eremogone congesta   (ballhead sandwort)  
Tufted, glabrous perennial from a branched, woody crown, forming mats up to 15 cm. broad, the flowering stems leafy, 1.5-4 dm. tall.
Distribution: Okanogan County, Washington, south on the east side of the Cascades to Oregon and the Sierra Nevada of California, east to the Rockies.
Habitat: Sagebrush desert to alpine slopes.
Origin: Native

Eremogone franklinii   (Thompson's sandwort)  
Tufted, glabrous perennial from a taproot and branched base, the numerous stems prostrate or spreading, covered with last year’s leaves; flowering stems erect, 3-6 cm. tall, brittle.
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Sand dunes, scabland and sagebrush slopes.
Origin: Native

Gypsophila paniculata   (baby's breath)  
(= Gypsophila paniculata in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glabrous, glaucous perennial, the stems freely-branched, 4-8 dm. tall.
Distribution: Introduced in the northern half of the United States
Habitat: Noxious weed in eastern Washington and Idaho
Origin: Introduced from Asia

Herniaria hirsuta   (rupturewort, herniary)  
Distribution: Recently collected in Spokane County; Washington and California, also in Maryland and Massachusetts
Habitat: Disturbed sandy flats, roadsides, and woodlands at low elevation
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia

Holosteum umbellatum   (jagged chickweed)  
(= Holosteum umbellatum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Somewhat glandular-pubescent annual, the 1-several stems simple or basally branched, 5-20 cm. tall.
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crestin Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, most common in the shrub-steppe.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Honckenya peploides   (seaside sandplant, sea purslane)  
(= Honkenya peploides in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glabrous, mat-forming, yellowish-green, fleshy perennial from a rhizome, the numerous, trailing, freely-branched stems with upturned flowering ends 1-3 dm. tall.
Distribution: Occuring along the coast in Washington; Alaska south to northern Oregon, northeastern North America and Greenland.
Habitat: Coastal beaches and sand dunes.
Origin: Native

Minuartia nuttallii   (Nuttall's sandwort, brittle stitchwort)  
(= Arenaria nuttallii in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glandular-pubescent perennial from a stout taproot and branched woody base, the trailing stems forming mats up to 3 dm. broad; flowering branches 3-10 cm. tall, very brittle and tending to shatter readily.
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Sagebrush hills to alpine slopes, especially on gravelly benches or talus.
Origin: Native

Minuartia obtusiloba   (twinflower sandwort, alpine sandwort)  
(= Arenaria obtusiloba in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Tufted perennial, forming mats up to 4 dm. broad, the stems trailing, the flowering stems 1-6 cm. tall, glandular-pubescent.
Distribution: In mountains throughout much of Washington; Alaska south to Oregon, south in the Rocky Mountains to New Mexico.
Habitat: Subalpine to alpine ridges and talus slopes.
Origin: Native

Minuartia rubella   (beautiful sandwort, boreal stitchwort)  
(= Arenaria rubella in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Mostly glandular-pubescent, tufted perennial from a slender taproot and branched crown, the numerous, short, prostrate stems forming small cushions; flowering stems 1-10 cm. tall, slender, simple or branched.
Distribution: Alaska to Greenland, south in the mountains to Oregon and New Mexico
Habitat: Subalpine to alpine meadows, ridges and talus slopes
Origin: Native

Minuartia tenella   (slender stitchwort)  
(= Arenaria stricta in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Annual from a taproot, the several stems erect to decumbent, 1-2.5 dm. tall, glandular-puberulent at least above.
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon.
Habitat: Lowlands, prairies and coastal bluffs.
Origin: Native

Moehringia lateriflora   (blunt-leaf sandwort)  
(= Arenaria lateriflora in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington, though more common east of the crest; occurring throughout much of North America except along the southern U.S. boundary.
Habitat: Forest understory and edge, open meadows.
Origin: Native

Moehringia macrophylla   (large-leaf sandwort)  
(= Arenaria macrophylla in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low perennial from slender rhizomes, forming patches with both sterile and flowering stems; stems branched, erect to decumbent, 5-15 cm. tall.
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades, east to the Atlantic Coast
Habitat: Moist to dry, shaded to open woods, meadows and rocky slopes in the mountains
Origin: Native

Moenchia erecta   (chickweed, upright)  
(taxon is not treated in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Taprooted annual, the stems ascending to erect, usually simple.
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California; in scattered locations in other parts of the central and southern U.S.
Habitat: Open, disturbed areas at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced

Myosoton aquaticum   (water chickweed, giant chickweed)  
Straggling, herbaceous perennial, the stems decumbent to ascending, simple or branched, up to 6 dm. tall, pubescent above. Capsule
Distribution: Introduced in much of eastern United States; occasional in the Pacific Coast states and British Columbia.
Habitat: Stream banks, woods, marshes and wet meadows.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Pseudostellaria jamesiana   (tuber starwort, sticky starwort)  
(= Stellaria jamesiana in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Perennial with thick, fleshy roots and slender rhizomes, the stems ascending to erect, 4-angled, 1.5-4 dm. tall, glabrous below and glandular-pubescent above.
Distribution: East of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho, Wyoming and New Mexico.
Habitat: Moist or dry open woods, rocky slopes and meadows, from moderate to high elevations.
Origin: Native

Sagina apetala   (annual pearlwort)  
(= Sagina apetala in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Delicate annual with numerous, filiform, ascending stems 3-5 cm. long; finely glandular-pubescent above, especially in the inflorescence and calyx.
Distribution: Occurring in the lowlands west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California; Kansas.
Habitat: Waste ground.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Sagina decumbens   (trailing pearlwort, western pearlwort)  
(= Sagina occidentalis in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Mostly glabrous annual, the 1-several freely branched stems ascending, 5-20 cm. long.
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to southern California.
Habitat: Moist soil at low elevations, but not typically coastal.
Origin: Native

Sagina maxima   (sticky-stem pearlwort, stick-stemmed pearlwort)  
Usually glabrous, fleshy biennial or perennial, the stems prostrate to ascending, slender, usually branched, up to 15 cm. long.
Distribution: Occurring in counties along the coast in Washington; distinctly coastal, Alaska south to Monterey County, California.
Habitat: Moist sand or rocks.
Origin: Native

Sagina procumbens   (bird-eye pearlwort)  
(= Sagina procumbens in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Mostly glabrous biennial or perennial, the slender stems mostly prostrate and free-rooting, up to 15 cm. long.
Distribution: Introduced west of the Cascades, British Columbia to California
Habitat: Moist areas, especially gardens
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Sagina saginoides   (arctic pearlwort, alpine pearlwort)  
(= Sagina saginoides in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains in the U.S. and Alberta; east across northern Canada to Greenland.
Habitat: Open areas, typically where at least seasonally moist, from mid elevations to the alpine.
Origin: Native

Saponaria ocymoides   (rock soapwort)  
(taxon is not treated in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Rhizomatous perennial with over-wintering leafy shoots, the stems procumbent, much-branched, 5-25 cm. tall.
Distribution: Garden plant, occasionally escaping but rarely persistent, in the Pacific Coast states and a few states in eastern United States.
Habitat: Old gardens, waste sites and rocky places.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Saponaria officinalis   (bouncing-bet)  
(= Saponaria officinalis in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glabrous, rhizomatous, leafy perennial forming large clumps, the several simple stems 4-9 dm. tall.
Distribution: Introduced throughout the United States; common east of the Cascades in Washington
Habitat: Roadsides and waste ground
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Scleranthus annuus   (annual knawel, German knotgrass)  
(= Scleranthus annuus in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low, spreading annual, the stems prostrate to ascending, up to 15 cm. long.
Distribution: Occasional introductions throughout the Pacific Northwest
Habitat: Disturbed soils, waste lots, cultivated areas.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Silene acaulis   (moss campion)  
(= Silene acaulis in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Cushion-like perennial from a woody root and branched crown, forming dense mats up to 3 dm. broad; flowering stems 3-6 cm. tall.
Distribution: Alaska to Oregon, and south in the Rocky Mountains to Arizona
Habitat: Rock crevices and talus slopes at high elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native

Silene antirrhina   (sleepy silene, sleepy catchfly)  
(= Silene antirrhina in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Erect, simple to branched annual, 2-8 dm. tall, puberulent below and glabrous above, glandular in bands below the nodes.
Distribution: Distributed widely throughout Washington; occurring across North America from low elevations to 10,000 feet.
Habitat: Open areas, often where disturbed.
Origin: Native

Silene armeria   (sweet William silene, sweet william catchfly)  
(= Silene armeria in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glabrous annual 1-7 dm. tall.
Distribution: Introduced as an ornmental and occasionally escaping throughout North America.
Habitat: Disturbed soil and wasteland.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Silene coronaria   (rose campion)  
Gray-woolly perennial from a branched crown; stems several, simple, stout, 4-10 dm. tall.
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho and Utah; eastern North America.
Habitat: Along roadways, railways and waste land.
Origin: Introduced

Silene csereii   (biennial campion)  
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Washington, east across the central and northern U.S. and Canada to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Disturbed areas including fields, roadsides, and wastelots.
Origin: Introduced

Silene dioica   (red catchfly)  
(= Lychnis dioica in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations in lowland western Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon, east to eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, roadsides, and wastelots where escaped from cultivation.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Silene douglasii   (seabluff catchfly, Douglas' catchfly)  
(= Silene douglasii in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Tufted perennial from a stout taproot and branched crown, the numerous, decumbent, simple stems 1-4 dm. tall, densely pubescent throughout.
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout most of Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Sagebrush plains to mountain slopes.
Origin: Native

Silene gallica   (common catchfly, windmill-pink)  
(= Silene gallica in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Annual, the stems simple or branched, 1-4 dm. tall, conspicuously pubescent with stiff, white hairs, glandular-pubescent above.
Distribution: Occurring in the lowlands west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho and Arizona; also in the eastern half of the U.S.
Habitat: Weed of disturbed soil and wasteland.
Origin: Introduced from Europe


Displaying matches 1 - 50 of 78. Next page.


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