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Family = Caryophyllaceae,

Displaying matches 51 - 79 of 79. Previous page.
Silene gallica   (common catchfly, windmill-pink)  
(= Silene gallica in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Annual, the stems simple or branched, 1-4 dm. tall, conspicuously pubescent with stiff, white hairs, glandular-pubescent above.
Distribution: Occurring in the lowlands west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho and Arizona; also in the eastern half of the U.S.
Habitat: Weed of disturbed soil and wasteland.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Silene latifolia   (bladder campion, white campion)  
(= Lychnis alba in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Stout, dioecious perennial from a branched crown, the several simple stems 5-11 dm. tall, stiff-hairy below and glandular in the inflorescence.
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; introduced in much of North America.
Habitat: Well established in undisturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Silene menziesii   (Menzies' campion)  
(= Silene menziesii in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low, dioecious perennial from slender rhizomes, the numerous, decumbent, branched stems 5-30 cm. long, usually hairy and glandular.
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Montana and New Mexico.
Habitat: Common in open woods from the lowlands to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Silene noctiflora   (nightflowering silene, night-flowering catchfly)  
(= Silene noctiflora in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Annual with 1-3 simple or branched stems, 2-6 dm. tall, stiff-hairy throughout and glandular-pubescent above.
Distribution: Introduced in much of the United States; more common east of the Cascades in Washington.
Habitat: Grain fields and waste areas.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Silene oregana   (Oregon silene, Oregon catchfly)  
(= Silene oregana in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains of Montana, Wyoming, and Utah.
Habitat: Forest openings and meadows from middle elevation to subalpine.
Origin: Native

Silene parryi   (Parry's silene)  
(= Silene parryi in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Pubescent and glandular perennial from a simple or branched base, the several stems simple, 2-4 dm. tall.
Distribution: Widely distributed across Washington; Alaska south to Oregon, east in the mountains to Montana and Utah.
Habitat: Open areas, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Silene scouleri   (simple campion)  
(= Silene scouleri in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Erect perennial herb from a simple to branched crown, the stems several, up to 8 dm. tall, densely pubescent throughout and glandular above.
Distribution: Occuring in localities on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Prairies and open timberland, low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native

Silene seelyi   (Seely's catchfly, Seely's silene)  
(= Silene seelyi in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glandular perennial from a branched crown and short rhizomes, the slender, ascending stems up to 3 dm. long.
Distribution: Wenatchee Mountains, Kittitas and Chelan Counties, Washington.
Habitat: Cliffs and talus slopes at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Silene spaldingii   (Spalding's silene)  
(= Silene spaldingii in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Woolly, viscid perennial from a simple or branched crown, the stems 2-6 dm. tall.
Distribution: Spokane and Whitman Counties, Washington, Wallowa County, Oregon, Idaho County, Idaho, and Flathead County, Montana; uncommon.
Habitat: Sagebrush, scabland and ponderosa pine forests.
Origin: Native

Silene suksdorfii   (Suksdorf's silene, Cascade catchfly)  
(= Silene suksdorfii in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Tufted perennial from a branched crown, the numerous, unbranched, erect stems up to 15 cm. tall, finely pubescent and glandular above.
Distribution: Occurring in the Cascades Mountains in Washington; from Mt. Baker, Washington area south to northern California.
Habitat: Alpine and subalpine slopes, often on talus.
Origin: Native

Silene vulgaris   (bladder campion)  
(= Silene cucubalus in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Usually glabrous perennial from a strong taproot, the stems up to 1 m. tall, but the lower branches often decumbent.
Distribution: Occurring in many areas throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America except along the southern areas of the U.S.
Habitat: Weed of waste ground, usually at lower elevations.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Spergula arvensis   (corn spurry)  
(= Spergula arvensis in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glandular-pubescent annual, the several stems ascending to erect, up to 6 dm. long.
Distribution: Introduced in much of the United States; mostly west of the Cascades in Washington and Oregon
Habitat: Weed of waste ground, usually at lower elevations
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Spergularia canadensis   (Canadian sandspurry)  
(= Spergularia canadensis in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glabrous or glandular-pubescent annual, the stems several, erect or ascending, up to 2.5 dm. long and about 1 mm. thick.
Distribution: Along the coast in Washington; Alaska south to California.
Habitat: Coastal tidelands and mudflats.
Origin: Native

Spergularia macrotheca   (sticky sandspurry, beach sandspurry)  
(= Spergularia macrotheca in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Herbaceous perennial with a thick, woody, branched crown, the stems decumbent to ascending, up to 4 dm. long and 1-2 mm. thick; herbage somewhat glandular-pubescent.
Distribution: Along the coast in Washington; British Columbia south to Baja California.
Habitat: Along the sea shore, often in salt marshes and rock crevices in the splash zone.
Origin: Native

Spergularia rubra   (red sandspurry)  
(= Spergularia rubra in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glandular-pubescent annual, the many prostrate stems up to 3 dm. long, but under 1 mm. thick.
Distribution: Occurring throughout Washington; introduced from Europe and common throughout North America.
Habitat: Weed of gardens, waste places, disturbed grasslands and forest openings.
Origin: Introduced from Europe

Spergularia salina   (salt sandspurry, saltmarsh sandspurry)  
(= Spergularia marina in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Somewhat glandular-pubescent annual with many ascending to erect stems up to 3.5 dm. long and only 1-1.5 mm. thick.
Distribution: Both coastal and inland populations in Washington; Native and introduced throughout North America.
Habitat: Saline or brackish areas along the coast, and alkaline areas inland.
Origin: Native

Stellaria alsine   (bog chickweed, bog stichwort)  
(= Stellaria alsine in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Washington in western North America; native to eastern North America; also introduced in Chile.
Habitat: Streambanks, culverts, ditches, and moist forest edges, typically where disturbed.
Origin: Introduced from eastern North America.

Stellaria borealis   (boreal starwort)  
Low, glabrous, matted perennial, the slender stems prostate to erect, 1-4 dm. long.
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to New York and Wyoming.
Habitat: Moist areas, rocky slopes and meadows.
Origin: Native

Stellaria calycantha   (northern starwort, northern bog starwort)  
(= Stellaria calycantha var. calycantha, Stellaria simcoei in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low perennial, often matted, the stems prostrate to ascending, 1-4 dm. long, glabrous.
Distribution: Circumpolar, south in North America to California, Michegan and New York.
Habitat: Moist meadows and steam banks, low to high elevations.
Origin: Native

Stellaria crispa   (curled starwort, crisped starwort)  
(= Stellaria crispa in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low, glabrous, matted perennial, the stems prostate to ascending, 5-30 cm. long.
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Alberta and Wyoming.
Habitat: Moist areas in the lowlands and lower mountains.
Origin: Native

Stellaria graminea   (grass-like starwort, grass-leaf starwort)  
(= Stellaria graminea in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Spreading, glabrous perennial with 4-angled, decumbent or ascending stems up to 10 dm. long
Distribution: Introduced and abundant in eastern United States; occasional in western Washington and Idaho.
Habitat: Chiefly in lawns.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia

Stellaria humifusa   (saltmarsh starwort)  
(= Stellaria humifusa in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glabrous, spreading perennial, the stems freely rooting, up to 2.5 dm. long.
Distribution: Occurring along the coast in Washington; Alaska south to Oregon, east across Canada to the Atlantic coast; circumpolar.
Habitat: Salt marshes.
Origin: Native

Stellaria longifolia   (long-leaved starwort)  
(= Stellaria longifolia in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America except in the south-central and southeastern U.S.
Habitat: Wet meadows, swamps, marshes, forested wetlands at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native

Stellaria longipes   (long-stalk starwort)  
(= Stellaria longipes vars. altocaulis, longipes in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Variable, low perennial from slender rhizomes, the stems glabrous, often matted, 4-angled, 5-30 cm. long.
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; Alaska south to California, east to New York and New Mexico.
Habitat: Moist streambanks and rocky slopes at mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Stellaria media   (common chickweed)  
(= Stellaria media in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Annual herb (sometimes overwintering in mild areas) with weak trailing stems 5-30 cm tall. Look for a distinct line of hairs running along each stem, and 5 small white deeply notched petals.
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout most of Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, often where moist in spring; very common.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia

Stellaria nitens   (shiny chickweed, shiny starwort)  
(= Stellaria nitens in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Usually glabrous, delicate, erect annual, the filiform stem up to 2 dm. tall, simple or branched below.
Distribution: British Columbia to Baja California, east to Idaho and Utah.
Habitat: Gravelly prairies and stream banks to grassy hillsides at low elevations.
Origin: Native

Stellaria obtusa   (Rocky Mountain chickweed, blunt-sepaled starwort)  
(= Stellaria obtusa in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Canadian and Southern Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Moist forest and riparian zone understory, talus slopes, from low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native

Stellaria umbellata   (umbrella starwort)  
(= Stellaria umbellata in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in central and south-central Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Northwest Territories, south throughout western U.S.
Habitat: Wetlands, riparian zones, stream banks.
Origin: Native

Vaccaria hispanica   (cow soapwort, cowcockle)  
(= Vaccaria segetalis in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Glabrous, glaucous annual from a taproot, the stem usually simple, up to 8 dm. tall.
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations across Washington; widely distributed throughout most of North America.
Habitat: Roadsides, railways and old fields.
Origin: Introduced from Europe


Displaying matches 51 - 79 of 79. Previous page.


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