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Family = Ericaceae,

Displaying matches 1 - 50 of 51.
Allotropa virgata   (sugarstick, candystick)  
(= Allotropa virgata in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Myco-heterotrophic herbs with simple, fleshy stems 1-4 dm. tall and 5-10 mm. thick, white- and pink-striped.
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Deep humus of coniferous forests at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native

Andromeda polifolia   (bog rosemary)  
Small, glabrous, evergreen, spreading shrubs 1-8 dm. tall.
Distribution: Likely in northern Washington; Alaska to Newfoundland, south in the U.S. to Idaho.
Habitat: Sphagnum bogs and other acidic wetlands.
Origin: Native

Arbutus menziesii   (Pacific madrone, Pacific madrona)  
(= Arbutus menziesii in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Trees to 30 m. tall, the bark smooth and chartreuse when young, aging to dark brownish-red.
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Chiefly in drier, often rocky, areas at low elevations
Origin: Native

Arctostaphylos columbiana   (hairy manzanita, bristly manzanita)  
(= Arctostaphylos columbiana in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Erect or spreading shrubs 1-3 m. tall, simple at the base, the old branches with purplish-red bark; young twigs grayish-pubescent, also with scattered bristles which may be glandular.
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest and in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Moist, open woods.
Origin: Native

Arctostaphylos nevadensis   
Shrubs with spreading to decumbent stems often forming large mats or mounds, the branch tips to 2 dm. tall; bark brownish-red, stems puberulent, sometimes glandular. The fruit is the best feature for distinguishing A. nevadensis from A. uva-ursi. The fruit of A. nevedensis is reddish with splotches of brown or black; that of A. uva-ursi is bright red. Without fruit, look at the leaf color. The leaves of A. nevadensis are bright green on both surfaces; those of A. uva-ursi are dark green on the upper surface and light green on the lower.
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Nevada.
Habitat: Chiefly in the mountains at mid-elevations.
Origin: Native

Arctostaphylos patula   (green-leaf manzanita)  
(= Arctostaphylos patula in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Spreading shrubs 1-2 m. tall, usually glabrous, the old bark reddish-brown.
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Montana and Colorado.
Habitat: Low elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi   (kinnikinnick, red bearberry)  
(= Arctostaphylos uva-ursi in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Shrub; stems trailing across ground, less than 2 dm tall. Low spreading shrub; leaves rounded at tip and about 2 cm. long; berries red rather than brown. Compare to A. nevadensis.
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; Alaska south to California and New Mexico, east to the Atlantic Coast; circumboreal.
Habitat: Coastal bluffs and prairies, rocky balds, dry subalpine meadows, and dry coniferous forest.
Origin: Native

Cassiope lycopodioides   (clubmoss mountain heather, ground pine heather)  
(taxon is not treated in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low shrubs, the stems prostrate to ascending, forming loose mats, hairy.
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to Washington.
Habitat: Alpine rocky slopes and crevices.
Origin: Native

Cassiope mertensiana   (western moss heather, Mertens' mountain heather)  
(= Cassiope mertensiana in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Mat-forming shrubs, the flowering stems 5-30 cm. tall, glabrous or finely pubescent.
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Montana, Idaho, and Nevada.
Habitat: Open, rocky areas in the alpine and subalpine.
Origin: Native

Cassiope tetragona   (four-angled mountain heather, white arctic mountain heather)  
(= Cassiope tetragona in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low, spreading shrubs, the flowering stems 5-30 cm. tall, the branches puberulent.
Distribution: Alaska to Washington, also in Montana
Habitat: Open, rocky areas in the alpine and subalpine
Origin: Native

Chimaphila menziesii   (little prince's-pine)  
(= Chimaphila menziesii in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low semi-shrubs from slender rhizomes, the stems only slightly woody, 5-15 cm. tall.
Distribution: Distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia to California, east to Montana and Utah.
Habitat: Coniferous forests at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Chimaphila umbellata   (pipsissewa, common prince's-pine)  
(= Chimaphila umbellata in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low semi-shrubs from slender rhizomes, the stems only slightly woody, 1-3 dm. tall.
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; Alaska to California, east to Montana and New Mexico, and Minnesota to Maine, south to North Carolina.
Habitat: Wooded areas, mostly coniferous, low to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Elliottia pyroliflora   (copperbush)  
(= Cladothamnus pyroliflorus in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Nearly glabrous shrub 0.5-3 m. tall.
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to Oregon.
Habitat: Moist forests and stream banks at mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Empetrum nigrum   (black crowberry)  
(= Empetrum nigrum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low, spreading shrub, up to 1.5 dm. tall, the somewhat woolly branches up to 3 dm. long.
Distribution: In the Cascades and Olympic Mountains of Washington; Alaska south to California.
Habitat: Exposed rocky bluffs, but also in peat bogs.
Origin: Native

Gaultheria hispidula   (creeping wintergreen, creeping snowberry)  
(= Gaultheria hispidula in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Creeping, slender-stemmed shrub, the stems with somewhat appressed, brownish-bristly hairs.
Distribution: Occurring in northeast Washsington; British Columbia east to Labrador, south into northern Idaho.
Habitat: Sphagnum bogs and deep coniferous woods.
Origin: Native

Gaultheria humifusa   (alpine spicy wintergreen, alpine wintergreen)  
(= Gaultheria humifusa in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low, depressed shrub up to 3 cm. tall, the stems trailing, up to 10 cm. long, glabrous or finely puberulent.
Distribution: In the Olympics and Cascades mountains of Washington; British Columbia south to northern California, east to the Rocky Mountains from Alberta to Colorado.
Habitat: Subalpine to alpine, usually where moist to wet.
Origin: Native

Gaultheria ovatifolia   (slender wintergreen, western teaberry)  
(= Gaultheria ovatifolia in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Low, spreading shrub up to 4 cm. tall, the branches slender, 5-20 cm. long, covered with soft, brown hairs.
Distribution: Chiefly in the Olympics and Cascades mountains in Washington, but also in the northeastern part of the State; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Forested areas from fairly dry Ponderosa pine to subalpine bogs.
Origin: Native

Gaultheria shallon   (salal)  
(= Gaultheria shallon in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Creeping to climbing or erect shrub, the stems 1-12 dm. long, covered with soft or stiff hairs.
Distribution: Chiefly in the Olympics and Cascades mountains in Washington; Alaska south to California.
Habitat: Woods, from sea level to moderate elevation in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Harrimanella stelleriana   (Alaska bell-heather, alpine heather)  
(= Cassiope stelleriana in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Mat-forming shrubs, the flowering stems 3-10 cm. tall, the branches minutely puberulent.
Distribution: Alaska to the high Cascades of Washington
Habitat: Rocky slopes and seeps, alpine to subalpine
Origin: Native

Hemitomes congestum   (coneplant, gnome-plant)  
(= Hemitomes congestum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Fleshy myco-heterotrophic plants with clusters of short, simple stems 3-20 cm. tall.
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington; Vancouver Island and mainland British Columbia south to Monterey County, California.
Habitat: Rich humus in damp coniferous forests at mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Kalmia microphylla   (Western swamp laurel)  
Low, evergreen shrub from short rhizomes, seldom over 1 dm. tall, the young stems puberulent, soon becoming glabrous.
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California; east in British Columbia to the Rockies, south to Colorado.
Habitat: In moist and wetland areas from the coast to higher elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Menziesia ferruginea   (fool's-huckleberry, false azalea)  
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska to California, east to Alberta, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming.
Habitat: Forest understory and edges from montane to subalpine.
Origin: Native

Moneses uniflora   (single-delight)  
(= Pyrola uniflora in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Perennial, glabrous herbs from slender rhizomes, the scapose stem 3-15 cm. long.
Distribution: Distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and in eastern North America.
Habitat: Moist woods with high-humas soils, sea level to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Monotropa hypopitys   (pinesap, many-flower indian-pipe)  
(= Hypopitys monotropa in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Leafless myco-heterotrophic plants with unbranched yellow or pink tinged stems. Flowers 2-several with distinct petals, anthers about 1 mm long, placentation axile rather than parietal, Compare to Pleuricospora and Pityopus.
Distribution: On both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: In humus of coniferous forests at low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native

Monotropa uniflora   (Indian-pipe, one-flower Indian-pipe)  
(= Monotropa uniflora in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Myco-heterotrophic plants with a cluster of simple flowering stems, waxy-white, blackening with age, 5-25 cm. tall.
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America except for Alaska, Yukon Territory, Nevada, and southern Rocky Mountain states.
Habitat: In humus in deep, shady woods at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native

Orthilia secunda   (sidebells wintergreen, one-sided pyrola, sidebells)  
(= Pyrola secunda vars. obtusata, secunda in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Perennial, glabrous herbs, spreading from slender rhizomes, the flowering stems single, 5-15 cm. tall.
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to New Mexico in the west, and across the northern half of the United States to the Atlantic
Habitat: Common in coniferous woods at moderate to mid-elevationn in the mountains
Origin: Native

Phyllodoce empetriformis   (pink mountain-heath)  
(= Phyllodoce empetriformis in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Matted, evergreen shrubs 1-4 dm. tall, forming large mats, the young stems finely pubescent and glandular, soon becoming glabrous.
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Alberta and Wyoming; in the Olympics and Cascades in Washington
Habitat: Rocky sites in high coniferous forests to alpine meadows
Origin: Native

Phyllodoce glanduliflora   (yellow mountain-heath)  
(= Phyllodoce glanduliflora in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Matted, evergreen shrubs 1-4 dm. tall, forming large mats, the young stems glandular-pubescent.
Distribution: Occurring in mountainous areas across Washington; Alaska south to Oregon, east to Wyoming.
Habitat: Rocky sites in high coniferous forests to alpine meadows and seeps.
Origin: Native

Pleuricospora fimbriolata   (fringed pinesap)  
(= Pleuricospora fimbriolata in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Fleshy myco-heterotrophic herbs with simple, whitish to yellow-brown stems 3-12 cm. tall, glabrous throughout.
Distribution: Western slope of the Cascades and the Olympic Mountains in Washington; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Uncommon in coniferous forests at mid-elevations.
Origin: Native

Pterospora andromedea   (woodland pinedrops)  
(= Pterospora andromedea in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Myco-heterotrophic herbs with simple stems 3-10 dm. tall, the stems reddish-brown, glandular-hairy and fleshy when in bloom, but over-wintering as dry, fibrous stalks.
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to South Dakota and Texas.
Habitat: Common in humas in coniferous forests, especially ponderosa pine forests.
Origin: Native

Pyrola asarifolia   (liverleaf wintergreen, pink pyrola)  
(= Pyrola asarifolia in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Perennial, glabrous herbs from wide-spreading rhizomes, the scapose stem 1.5-4 dm. tall.
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of forested Washington except for the southeast corner; Alaska south to California, east to Colorado in the west, and across the northern half of the United States to the Atlantic.
Habitat: Moist ground in woodlands and forests, lowlands to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native

Pyrola chlorantha   (green-flowered wintergreen)  
(= Pyrola chlorantha in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Perennial, glabrous herbs from slender rhizomes, the flowering stems usually single, 1-2 dm. tall, usually with 1-several leaves at the base; sterile stems leafy.
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and across northern U.S. and Canada to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Chiefly in coniferous forests at moderate to mid-elevations, usually where moist.
Origin: Native

Pyrola minor   (snowline wintergreen, lesser wintergreen)  
(= Pyrola minor in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Perennial, glabrous herbs from slender rhizomes, the single, scapose stem 1-2 dm. tall.
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains; east across Canada and northern U.S. to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Uncommon, mostly in moist areas in coniferous woods, moderate to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Pyrola picta   (white-veined wintergreen)  
(= Pyrola dentata, Pyrola picta in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Perennial, glabrous herbs, spreading from slender rhizomes, with several leafy, sterile stems, the flowering stems usually single, reddish-brown, 10-25 cm. tall.
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, east to South Dakota and New Mexico
Habitat: Coniferous woods, especially ponderosa pine, moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native

Rhododendron albiflorum   (white rhododendron, Cascade azalea)  
(= Rhododendron albiflorum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Deciduous shrubs 1-2 m. tall, the young twigs finely puberulent and covered with stiff, aligned reddish hairs, this same hairiness present on young leaves, bracts and calyx.
Distribution: British Columbia to Oregon, east to Montana
Habitat: Moist, usually forested, slopes, mid- to high elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native

Rhododendron columbianum   (western Labrador tea)  
(= Ledum glandulosum var. glandulosum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Evergreen shrubs 0.5-2 m. tall, the twigs puberulent and glandular-dotted.
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia and Alberta south to California, east to Montana, Wyoming, and Utah.
Habitat: Swamps and bogs, lowlands to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Rhododendron groenlandicum   (Labrador tea)  
Evergreen shrubs 0.5-2 m. tall, the twigs strigose pubescent.
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to Oregon and Idaho, east across Canada and the northern U.S. to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Swamps and bogs along the coast.
Origin: Native

Rhododendron macrophyllum   (Pacific rhododendron, California rhododendron)  
(= Rhododendron macrophyllum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Evergreen shrubs 1-5 m. tall, the branches puberulent when young, becoming glabrate.
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Moist woods, sea level to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Vaccinium caespitosum   (dwarf huckleberry, dwarf bilberry)  
(= Vaccinium caespitosum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Deciduous shrubs spreading widely by rhizomes and forming mats 1.5-3 dm. tall, the twigs somewhat angled, with yellowish-green to reddish bark, usually finely puberulent.
Distribution: Widely distributed in the mountainous areas of Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Colorado; across southern Canada and the northern tier of states from Minnesota to Maine.
Habitat: Moist rocky ridges and meadows, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Vaccinium corymbosum   (highbush blueberry)  
(taxon is not treated in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Deciduous shrubs, the stems 10-50 dm. tall; twigs green, angular to terete, hairy in lines.
Distribution: Widespread and native in eastern United States; introduced in Washington.
Habitat: Open swamps, sandy margins of ponds and lakes.
Origin: Introduced from eastern North America

Vaccinium deliciosum   (Cascade blueberry, blueleaf huckleberry, Cascade bilberry, rainier blueberry)  
(= Vaccinium deliciosum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Deciduous, low, often matted shrub 1.5-4 dm. tall, the branches slightly angled, greenish-brown, glabrous.
Distribution: Ocurring in the Olympic and Cascade Mountains of Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Forest openings and mountain meadows, mid- to high elevations.
Origin: Native

Vaccinium macrocarpon   (cranberry, large cultivated cranberry)  
(= Vaccinium macrocarpon in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Distribution: In scattered locations in lowlands west of the Cascades crest; introduced British Columbia south to California; native eastern North
Origin: Introduced from northeast US

Vaccinium membranaceum   (thin-leaved huckleberry, tall huckleberry, square-twig blueberry)  
(= Vaccinium globulare, Vaccinium membranaceum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Deciduous spreading shrub 0.5-2 m. tall, the young twigs slightly angled, yellow-green, glabrous, the old bark grayish and shredding.
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout forested and mountainous areas of Washington; British Columbia south to California, east the Rocky Mountains; Ontario and Michigan.
Habitat: Common in dry to moist coniferous forests and open areas, moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Vaccinium myrtilloides   (velvet-leaf huckleberry, velvet-leaf blueberry)  
(taxon is not treated in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Deciduous shrubs, forming open colonies, the stems 1-11.5 dm. tall; twigs greenish-brown, terete, hairy.
Distribution: British Columbia east to Labrador, and in the northern tier of states, Montana to West Virginia; Okanogan County in Washington.
Habitat: Mountain meadows, forest openings, bogs and barrens.
Origin: Native

Vaccinium myrtillus   (dwarf blueberry, whortleberry, low blueberry)  
(= Vaccinium myrtillus in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Deciduous, many-branched shrub 2-3 dm. tall, the branches strongly angled, greenish, usually puberulent.
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades, British Columbia to Oregon, east to Montana, and south in the Rockies to Arizona and New Mexico
Habitat: Forest openings, mid-elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native

Vaccinium ovalifolium   (oval-leaf blueberry, Alaska blueberry)  
(= Vaccinium ovalifolium in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Spreading deciduous shrub 4-10 dm. tall, flowering before the leaves have reached half their mature size; twigs yellowish-green strongly angled, glabrous, the old branches grayish.
Distribution: Occurring in forested and mountainous areas throughout Washington; Alaska south to Oregon, east to Idaho, and then scattered areas to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Openings in coniferous forests, moderate to fairly high elevations.
Origin: Native

Vaccinium ovatum   (California huckleberry, evergreen huckleberry)  
(= Vaccinium ovatum in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Evergreen, spreading to upright shrub, 0.5-4 m. tall, the young stems pubescent. Our only Vaccinium species with leathery, evergreen leaves and flowers in recemes.
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Coniferous forests at low elevations.
Origin: Native

Vaccinium oxycoccos   (small cranberry)  
(= Vaccinium oxycoccos in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Evergreen creeping shrub with glabrous to finely pubescent stems.
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Idaho, across Canada; from the upper Midwest to the Atlantic coast.
Habitat: Usually in sphagnum bogs.
Origin: Native

Vaccinium parvifolium   (red huckleberry)  
(= Vaccinium parvifolium in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Erect shrub 1-4 m. tall, the branches green, very prominently angled, usually glabrous.
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska to California on both sides of the Cascades, but much more common on the west side
Habitat: Moist woods, sea level to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native

Vaccinium scoparium   (grouse whortleberry, grouseberry)  
(= Vaccinium scoparium in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Deciduous shrub, more or less matted, 1-2.5 dm. tall, the branches numerous, slender, broom-like, strongly angled, greenish or yellowish-green, usually glabrous.
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Colorado.
Habitat: Open, dry forests, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native



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