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Family = Scrophulariaceae,

Displaying matches 1 - 7 of 7.
Buddleja davidii   (orange-eye butterfly-bush)  
(= Buddleja davidii in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Distribution: Introduced in western Washington; British Columbia south to California, and eastern United States.
Habitat: Escaped ornamental; roadsides and waste ground
Origin: Introduced

Limosella aquatica   (water mudwort, awl-leaf mudwort)  
(= Limosella aquatica in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Tiny, glabrous, scapose perennial, with fibrous roots from a small crown.
Distribution: Widespread in the Northern Hemisphere; found throughout the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: In shallow water or wet mud, in the valleys and plains.
Origin: Native

Scrophularia californica   (California figwort)  
Herbaceous perennial from a thickened root, the square stems clustered, stout, 5-15 dm. tall; herbage usually covered with fine, spreading hairs, with stalked glands in the inflorescence.
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington, chiefly in coastal counties; British Columbia south to Oregon.
Habitat: Forest margins and prairies at low elevations.
Origin: Native

Scrophularia lanceolata   (lance-leaf figwort)  
(= Scrophularia lanceolata in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Herbaceous perennial from a thickened root, the square stems clustered, stout, 5-15 dm. tall; herbage usually covered with fine, spreading hairs, with stalked glands in the inflorescence.
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east across the northern two-thirds of the United States and most of Canada.
Habitat: Moist areas at low elevations, but not along the coast.
Origin: Native

Verbascum blattaria   (moth mullein)  
(= Verbascum blattaria in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Taprooted biennial, producing a rosette of basal leaves the first year, and the second year a single, upright stem 4-15 dm. tall, which is glabrous below and with stalked glands in the inflorescence.
Distribution: Ocurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; introduced over most of the United States.
Habitat: Open areas in waste ground, tolerant of moist to dry.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia

Verbascum thapsus   (common mullein, flannel mullein, great mullein)  
(= Verbascum thapsus in Flora of the Pacific Northwest)
Coarse, taprooted biennial, producing a rosette of basal leaves the first year, and a single, erect stem 0.4-2 m. tall the second year, the entire plant covered with white-woolly, branched hairs.
Distribution: Distributed widely throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Common on open, disturbed ground, roadsides and logged areas in the mountains.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia

Verbascum virgatum   
Distribution: Lowland western Washington; Washington south to California, east across the southern U.S. and in eastern North America.
Habitat: Open disturbed areas at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced



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