Vascular Plants - Asteraceae - Bellis:
Bellis perennis
Page Author: Don Knoke
English daisy, lawn daisy 
Blooms: March - September
Habit: herb
Duration: perennial
Origin: Introduced
Distribution: Introduced throughout the United States; chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington and Oregon
Habitat: Lawns and cultivated areas, usually where moist
Species Description:

General: Perennial with fibrous roots and spreading hairs, the naked flowering stalks 5-20 cm. high.
Leaves: All basal, the blade elliptic or obovate to orbicular, dentate with small teeth, up to 4 cm. long and 2 cm. wide, narrowed to a petiole about the same length.
Flowers: Heads solitary, radiate, the disk 5-10 mm. wide, yellow; rays numerous, pistillate, white to pink, about 1 cm. long; pappus none.
Fruits: Achenes compressed, 2 nerved.
Accepted Name:
Bellis perennis L.
Synonyms:
(none)

Treated in Flora of the PNW as:
Bellis perennis
Additional Resources:

PNW Herbaria Specimens: View list of all Bellis perennis specimens in the Consortium of Pacific Northwest Herbaria database.

WTU Herbarium Specimens: View list of Bellis perennis specimens in the WTU Herbarium database.

Washington Flora Checklist: Bellis perennis treatment.

E-Flora BC: Bellis perennis atlas page.

CalPhotos: Bellis perennis images.

USDA Plants Database: Bellis perennis.
Additional photographs of Bellis perennis:
(click on a thumbnail to view larger photo)

Ben Legler, 2004

Ben Legler, 2004

Ben Legler, 2004

Ben Legler, 2004

Dana Visalli

Ben Legler, 2005

Ben Legler, 2005

Bud Kovalchik

G. D. Carr, 2006

G. D. Carr, 2007

G. D. Carr, 2006

Paul Slichter, 2009

Paul Slichter, 2009

Douglas Houck, 2012

Douglas Houck, 2012

Douglas Houck, 2012

G. D. Carr, 2012

G. D. Carr, 2012

G. D. Carr, 2012
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Washington Native Plant Society
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