Page author: Wynn Tranfield
Lyophyllum decastes
fried chicken mushroom
WTU specimens
Other herbaria

Distribution: Occurs in large dense clusters and is rather common, occurring primarily in disturbed areas such as campgrounds and along roadsides and trailsides in conifer forests.

Spores: broadly ellipsoid to nearly globose, 5--7 x 5--6.5 µm

Conservation Status: Not of concern

Edibility: . L. decastes is edible and considered quite good by some mycophagists, but only mediocre by others. Because many possibly poisonous entolomas can be quite similar in stature and coloration, be sure to collect only specimens growing in large clusters and having white spores (entolomas have sordid pink spores and do not grow in large clusters).

Description:
Edibility:

. L. decastes is edible and considered quite good by some mycophagists, but only mediocre by others. Because many possibly poisonous entolomas can be quite similar in stature and coloration, be sure to collect only specimens growing in large clusters and having white spores (entolomas have sordid pink spores and do not grow in large clusters).

Identification Notes:

The cap is smooth and has a consistently slippery feel, but is highly variable in color, ranging from whitish to pale watery tan to grayish brown or almost black. These different color forms are considered separate species (e.g., L. fumosum (Persoon: Fries) P. D. Orton and L. loricatum (Fries) Kühner) by some mycologists, but the lack of distinct breakpoints in the color range and consistent correlated features make this view difficult to apply. The stipe is fairly thick and whitish or flushed brownish gray. The spores are broadly ellipsoid to nearly globose, 5--7 x 5--6.5 µm.

Accepted Name:
Lyophyllum decastes (Fr.) Singer

Synonyms & Misapplications:
(none provided)
Additional Resources:

PNW Herbaria: Specimen records of Lyophyllum decastes in the Consortium of Pacific Northwest Herbaria database.

CalPhotos: Lyophyllum decastes photos.

8 photographs:
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