Vascular Plants

Includes all flowering plants, conifers, ferns and fern-allies.

Browse by common name:
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z
Common names beginning with M:
Wild madder (Galium mollugo)
Distribution: Scattered locations in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Wyoming; widely distributed in east of the Mississippi River.
Habitat: Occurring in disturbed soil, waste ground.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-July
Common madia (Madia elegans)
Distribution: Southwest Washington, south through western Oregon to California.
Habitat: Dry, open places, often becoming a roadside weed.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Threadstem madia (Madia exigua)
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades, southern British Columbia to California, east to northwest Montana and Nevada.
Habitat: Dry, open woods and grasslands, from the plains and foothills, occasionally up to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Pacific madrona (Arbutus menziesii)
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Chiefly in drier, often rocky, areas at low elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii)
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Chiefly in drier, often rocky, areas at low elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Madweed (Scutellaria lateriflora)
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; occurring throughout North America.
Habitat: Moist bottomlands and meadows, low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Madwort (Alyssum alyssoides)
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America except for parts of southeastern U.S.
Habitat: Dry, waste areas, becoming common in the shrub-steppe of eastern Washington.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-July
Madwort (Asperugo procumbens)
Distribution: Introduced in much of the northern part of the United States; common east of the Cascades in Washington and Oregon
Habitat: A weed of moist soil in fields, roadsides and other disturbed areas, mostly east of the Cascades.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May - July
Pale alyssum madwort (Alyssum alyssoides)
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America except for parts of southeastern U.S.
Habitat: Dry, waste areas, becoming common in the shrub-steppe of eastern Washington.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-July
Northern maidenhair fern (Adiantum aleuticum)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east sporadically to the Rocky Mountains, and also in northeastern North America.
Habitat: Moist woods and streambanks, lowlands to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
One-leaved malaxis (Malaxis monophyllos)
Origin: Native
Male fern (Dryopteris filix-mas)
Origin: Native
Alkali mallow (Malva parviflora)
Distribution: Scattered locations in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Waste places, disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced from Eurpoe
Flowers: March-August
Common mallow (Malva sylvestris)
Distribution: Scattered locations on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Waste places and disturbed soil.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-September
Dwarf mallow (Malva neglecta)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington on both sides of the Cascades; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Common weed of roadsides, waste areas, gardens, and disturbed sites.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-September
High mallow (Malva sylvestris)
Distribution: Scattered locations on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Waste places and disturbed soil.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-September
Low mallow (Malva pusilla)
Origin: Introduced
Musk mallow (Malva moschata)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Wyoming, and Tennesee to Maine in eastern United states.
Habitat: Garden plant occasionally escaping in disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May-July
Small-whorl mallow (Malva parviflora)
Distribution: Scattered locations in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Waste places, disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced from Eurpoe
Flowers: March-August
American mannagrass (Glyceria grandis)
Distribution: Alaska south to Oregon, chiefly east of the Cascades; east to northeast United States and south to Virginia and New Mexico.
Habitat: Sloughs, damp meadows and stream borders.
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late June - Early August
Canada mannagrass (Glyceria canadensis)
Origin: Introduced
Rattlesnake mannagrass (Glyceria canadensis)
Origin: Introduced
Tall mannagrass (Glyceria elata)
Distribution: British Columbia south on both sides of the Cascades to California, east to Montana and New Mexico.
Habitat: Lake margins, stream banks, moist mountain meadows and other wet areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Tall mannagrass (Glyceria maxima)
Origin: Introduced
Water mannagrass (Glyceria fluitans)
Origin: Introduced
Coastal manroot (Marah oregana)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Low elevation fields, thickets and open areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Manyflower (Nicotiana acuminata)
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August - October
Fourleaf manyseed (Polycarpon tetraphyllum)
Origin: Introduced
Bristly manzanita (Arctostaphylos columbiana)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest and in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Moist, open woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Green-leaf manzanita (Arctostaphylos patula)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Montana and Colorado.
Habitat: Low elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Medium manzanita (Arctostaphylos ×media)
Distribution: Chiefly on the east side of the Olympic Peninsula, Washington
Habitat: Low to moderate elevations
Origin: Native
Pinemat manzanita (Arctostaphylos nevadensis)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Nevada.
Habitat: Chiefly in the mountains at mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Big-leaf maple (Acer macrophyllum)
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to northern California.
Habitat: Moist woods from sea level to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-June
Norway maple (Acer platanoides)
Distribution: Introduced in scattered localities throughout Washington; east to Idaho, and in northeastern United States.
Habitat: Escapes from cultivation.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April
Silver maple (Acer saccharinum)
Distribution: Increasingly common east of the Cascades, occasional west of the Cascades; introduced as an ornamental from eastern and central North America .
Habitat: Moist soil of bottomlands.
Origin: Introduced from other parts of North America
Flowers: March-April
Sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus)
Distribution: Introduced in northeastern United States
Habitat: Rarely escapes from cultivation in the Pacific Northwest
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May
Vine maple (Acer circinatum)
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to northern California.
Habitat: Moist woods from sea level to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-June
Common mare's-tail (Hippuris vulgaris)
Distribution: Widely distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska to south California and New Mexico, east through southern Canada and the northern states to Maine.
Habitat: Streams, ponds and shallow lakes, generally at least partially emerged.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Mountain mare's-tail (Hippuris montana)
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska to Washington, east to Northwest Territories and Alberta.
Habitat: Wet meadows, streams and mossy banks in the moungtains
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Annual marguerite (Mauranthemum paludosum)
Origin: Introduced
Golden marguerite (Cota tinctoria)
Distribution: In scattered locations in Washington; widely distributed across northern half of North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, often where dry.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-September
Beck's water marigold (Bidens beckii)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to Oregon, east across northern U.S. and Canada to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Lowland ponds and lakes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Bur marigold (Bidens cernua)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Stream banks, pond and lake edges, and other wet places at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Pot marigold (Calendula officinalis)
Origin: Introduced
Water marigold (Bidens beckii)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to Oregon, east across northern U.S. and Canada to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Lowland ponds and lakes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Marihuana (Cannabis sativa)
Distribution: Introduced in much of the United States
Habitat: Illegal plantings in openings in the forests
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June - September
Baker's mariposa (Calochortus apiculatus)
Distribution: Occurring in the northeast corner of Washington; southern British Columbia south to Washington, east to Alberta, Idaho, and Montana.
Habitat: Dry, rocky slopes in open coniferous woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
Mountain mariposa (Calochortus subalpinus)
Distribution: Chiefly in the Cascades of Washington near Mt. Adams and Mt St. Helens, Washington; south to the Three Sisters in Oregon.
Habitat: Open forests in loose volcanic soils, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Northwestern mariposa (Calochortus elegans)
Distribution: East of the Casades in Washington; Washington south to Oregon and northern California, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Grassy hillsides and open coniferous forests, mid- to high elvations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Sagebrush mariposa (Calochortus macrocarpus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Nevada.
Habitat: Dry open forests and hills, low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Wide-fruited mariposa (Calochortus eurycarpus)
Distribution: Occurring in southeastern Washington; eastern Oregon, east to Montana and Wyoming.
Habitat: Grasslands and open coniferous forests at moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Lyall's mariposa-lily (Calochortus lyallii)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south along the east slope of the Cascades in Washington.
Habitat: Dry, open coniferous forests at moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Subalpine mariposa-lily (Calochortus subalpinus)
Distribution: Chiefly in the Cascades of Washington near Mt. Adams and Mt St. Helens, Washington; south to the Three Sisters in Oregon.
Habitat: Open forests in loose volcanic soils, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Three-spot mariposa-lily (Calochortus apiculatus)
Distribution: Occurring in the northeast corner of Washington; southern British Columbia south to Washington, east to Alberta, Idaho, and Montana.
Habitat: Dry, rocky slopes in open coniferous woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
Wild marjoram (Origanum vulgare)
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington; introduced from Eurasia into northeastern United States.
Habitat: Escaped from cultivation along roadsides and in disturbed soil.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: July-September
Broadleaved marsh-marigold (Caltha biflora)
Origin: Native
Twinflowered marsh-marigold (Caltha biflora)
Origin: Native
Floating marsh-pennywort (Hydrocotyle ranunculoides)
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California, east to the Atlantic coast.
Habitat: Marshes, ponds and wet ground.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Western marsh-rosemary (Limonium californicum)
Distribution: Recently (2016) collected in Whatcom county; Oregon south along coast through California to Baja California, Mexico.
Habitat: Coastal salt marshes
Origin: Introduced from Oregon or California
Flowers: July-September
Purple marshlocks (Comarum palustre)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of Washington; Alaska east across Canada to the Atlantic Coast, south to California and east across the northern half of the U.S.
Habitat: Bogs, wet meadows and lake margins, sea level to subalpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Yellow marshmarigold (Caltha palustris)
Distribution: Coastal Alaska, south along the coast to Oregon
Habitat: Mostly in coastal bogs
Origin: Both native and introduced populations
Flowers: July - August
Blue-lips blue-eyed Mary (Collinsia grandiflora)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east in the Columbia River Gorge.
Habitat: Open, moist to rather dry areas, low to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Small-flower blue-eyed Mary (Collinsia parviflora)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; Alaska south to California and Colorado, east to Ontario and Michigan.
Habitat: Lowlands to alpine meadows in vernally (springtime) moist areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-July
Mahala mat (Ceanothus prostratus)
Distribution: East slope of the Cascades in Washington from , Yakima County south; Washington south to California, east to Idaho and western Nevada.
Habitat: Drier open woods, moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Matchweed (Gutierrezia sarothrae)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington, chiefly in southeastern part of state; Alberta to Manitoba, south to California and Texas.
Habitat: Dry, open places in the foothills, valleys and plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Matrimony-vine (Lycium barbarum)
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Disturbed ground.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: June-September
Matweed (Amaranthus blitoides)
Distribution: Introduced in the Pacific Northwest; more common east of the Cascades
Habitat: Dry, disturbed areas
Origin: Introduced from central United States
Flowers: June - September
May-lily (Maianthemum dilatatum)
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to northern Idaho.
Habitat: Shady, moist areas, open to dense woods, sea level to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
False mayweed (Tripleurospermum inodorum)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout northern 2/3 of North America.
Habitat: Noxious weed in fields and waste ground in eastern Washington
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June-September
Scented mayweed (Matricaria chamomilla)
Distribution: Widespread across the United States and southern Canada.
Habitat: Roadsides, dry waste sites.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: Late April - June
Scentless mayweed (Tripleurospermum inodorum)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout northern 2/3 of North America.
Habitat: Noxious weed in fields and waste ground in eastern Washington
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June-September
Japanese mazus (Mazus pumilus)
Distribution: Introduced in eastern United States and in scattered locations in southwest Washington and adjacent Oregon.
Habitat: Lawns and wet bottom lands.
Origin: Introduced from Asia
Flowers: May - November
Douglas's meadow-foam (Limnanthes douglasii)
Origin: Introduced
Creeping meadow-foxtail (Alopecurus arundinaceus)
Origin: Introduced
Field meadow-foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis)
Distribution: Alaska to Newfoundland, south to Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Missouri, and New Jersey. Found on both sides of the Cascades in WA.
Habitat: Swampy areas in meadows, in irrigated fields, and along roadsides.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: June - July
Pacific meadow-foxtail (Alopecurus saccatus)
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Slender meadow-foxtail (Alopecurus myosuroides)
Distribution: Introduced in many parts of North America; occasional in Washington and Oregon.
Habitat: Wet places.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June - August
Tufted meadow-foxtail (Alopecurus carolinianus)
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - July
Purple meadow-rue (Thalictrum dasycarpum)
Distribution: Occurring in the northeastern corner of Washington; Alberta south to Arizona, east to central North America.
Habitat: Meadowlands and moist woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Veiny-leaf meadow-rue (Thalictrum venulosum)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Yukon Territory to Nevada, east to eastern North America, south to New Mexico.
Habitat: Riparian areas, coniferous forest understory.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
White meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba)
Origin: Introduced
Black medic (Medicago lupulina)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Waste places and sandy or gravelly soil.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April-August
Spotted medic (Medicago arabica)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana; also in the central, southern, and northeastern U.S.
Habitat: Disturbed areas including wastelots, roadsides and fields.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April-July
Burr medick (Medicago minima)
Distribution: Sparingly introduced in the Pacific Coast states, and some states in the southern and eastern United States
Habitat: Escaped from cultivation
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: March - June
Toothed medick (Medicago polymorpha)
Distribution: Introduced from Europe and found almost throughout the United States; escecially abundant west of the Cascades and Sierra Nevada.
Habitat: Waste ground and disturbed areas, mostly at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: March - June
Medusa-head (Taeniatherum caput-medusae)
Distribution: Sparingly introduced in east-central Washington; more common on both sides of the Cascades in Oregon, east into southeast Idaho and south into California.
Habitat: Weed of waste ground.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - June
Silky melic (Melica ciliata)
Origin: Introduced
Annual mercury (Mercurialis annua)
Origin: Introduced
False mermaidweed (Floerkea proserpinacoides)
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east across the northern U.S. and southern Canada to the Altantic Coast.
Habitat: Along vernal streams in the foothills to wet areas at mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Redspike Mexican-hat (Ratibida columnifera)
Distribution: Southeast British Columbia and Montana, east to Minnesota and south to Texas.
Habitat: Prairies, plains and waste ground.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-August
Mezereon (Daphne mezereum)
Origin: Introduced
Mezereon (Thymelaea passerina)
Origin: Introduced
Paradise-plant mezereon (Daphne mezereum)
Origin: Introduced
Bog microseris (Microseris borealis)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern Alaska south to northern California.
Habitat: Sphagnum bogs and wet meadows in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Coast microseris (Microseris bigelovii)
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Cut-leaved microseris (Microseris laciniata)
Distribution: Washington to California, from the eastern foothills of the Cascades to the coast.
Habitat: Usually in fairly moist meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Linearleaf microseris (Uropappus lindleyi)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho, south to Texas.
Habitat: Open hillsides, forest openings, from low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-May
Nodding microseris (Microseris nutans)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains and South Dakota.
Habitat: Open areas to open forests, somewhat moist places, low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Midsummer-men (Rhodiola integrifolia)
Distribution: In the Cascades and northeastern corner of Washington; Alaska to south to California, east to Colorado.
Habitat: Cliffs, talus and ridges, subalpine to alpine, generally where moist in early summer.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
White upright mignonette (Reseda alba)
Distribution: Introduced sparingly in Washington, usually along the coast; British Columbia south to California; upper central and eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed ground.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May-October
American milfoil (Myriophyllum sibiricum)
Distribution: Widespread in North America; British Columbia south the California, east to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Ponds and quiet streams, often in brackish water.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Andean water milfoil (Myriophyllum quitense)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east across Canada to New Brunswick, east in the U.S. to Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah; occurring in Mexico and South America.
Habitat: Ponds and slow-moving streams.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Eurasian water milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Ponds, lakes, and quiet streams.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: April-October
Hybrid Eurasian milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum × Myriophyllum sibiricum)
Origin: Introduced
Milfoil (Achillea millefolium)
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington, from the coast to the alpine; circumboreal; widespread throughout North America.
Habitat: Common in open, dry to somewhat moist areas from low to high elevations; tolerant of disturbance.
Origin: Both native and introduced populations
Flowers: April-October
Northern milfoil (Myriophyllum sibiricum)
Distribution: Widespread in North America; British Columbia south the California, east to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Ponds and quiet streams, often in brackish water.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Siberian water milfoil (Myriophyllum sibiricum)
Distribution: Widespread in North America; British Columbia south the California, east to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Ponds and quiet streams, often in brackish water.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
South American water milfoil (Myriophyllum aquaticum)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Ponds and slow-moving streams.
Origin: Introduced from South America
Flowers: May-July
Spiked water milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Ponds, lakes, and quiet streams.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: April-October
Terrestrial water milfoil (Myriophyllum ussuriense)
Distribution: Known in Washington only from Skamania County;
Habitat: Freshwater intertidal zone on mudflats. British Columbia south to Oregon; circumboreal.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Two-leaf milfoil (Myriophyllum heterophyllum)
Distribution: Known only from Puget Sound lowlands in Washington; British Columbia south to California; widely distributed east of the Mississippi River in Canada and the U.S where apparently it is native.
Habitat: Lakes and ponds.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-October
Ussurian milfoil (Myriophyllum ussuriense)
Distribution: Known in Washington only from Skamania County;
Habitat: Freshwater intertidal zone on mudflats. British Columbia south to Oregon; circumboreal.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Verticillate milfoil (Myriophyllum verticillatum)
Distribution: Distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington;
Habitat: Aquatic habitats below the water surface.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Waterwort water milfoil (Myriophyllum quitense)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east across Canada to New Brunswick, east in the U.S. to Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah; occurring in Mexico and South America.
Habitat: Ponds and slow-moving streams.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Western milfoil (Myriophyllum hippuroides)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California; also in Illinois.
Habitat: Ponds and slow-moving streams.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-October
Western water milfoil (Myriophyllum hippuroides)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California; also in Illinois.
Habitat: Ponds and slow-moving streams.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-October
Whorled water milfoil (Myriophyllum verticillatum)
Distribution: Distributed on both sides of the Cascades in Washington;
Habitat: Aquatic habitats below the water surface.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Devil's milk (Chelidonium majus)
Distribution: Weedy introduction across southern Canada and the northern tier of states in the United States.
Habitat: Moist to dry woods, roadsides, fields, waste areas.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May - July
Mad woman's milk (Euphorbia helioscopia)
Distribution: Introduced chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Weed of cultivated areas and abondoned gardens.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: April-July
Wolf's milk (Euphorbia virgata)
Distribution: Introduced in much of the United States, except Oklahoma to Virginia and south; mostly eastern Washington, Idaho and Montana in the Pacific Northwest
Habitat: Noxious weed of disturbed soils
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - June
Alpine milk-vetch (Astragalus alpinus)
Distribution: Circumpolar, arctic to sub-alpine regions, south to Okanogan County, WA, the Wallowa Mountains of Oregon, and the Rocky Mountains of Montana and Idaho.
Habitat: Open, often rocky areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Ames's milk-vetch (Astragalus pulsiferae)
Distribution: Mt. Adams and Klickitat County, Washington, and the ascades and northern Sierra Nevada of California; not reported from Oregon.
Habitat: Sandy and gravelly flats in sagebrush and open pine forests on basalt.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July
Arthur's milk-vetch (Astragalus arthurii)
Distribution: Occurring in the southeastern corner of Washington; northern foothills of the Wallowa and Blue Mountains in Oregon and Nez Perce County, Idaho.
Habitat: Dry, grassy and rocky meadows, on basalt.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Asotin milk-vetch (Astragalus asotinensis)
Distribution: Endemic to Snake River Canyon of WA and ID.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-May
Balloon milk-vetch (Astragalus whitneyi)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: High, open, rocky ridges and slopes, often in serpentine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Basalt milk-vetch (Astragalus conjunctus)
Distribution: Wasco County, Oregon, to the Blue Mountains, south along the Malheur River to the Steens, and east into Idaho
Habitat: Drier areas, moderate and higher elevations
Origin: Native
Basalt milk-vetch (Astragalus filipes)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to northeast California, east to Nevada and Idaho.
Habitat: Sagebrush plains and lower foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Beckwith's milk-vetch (Astragalus beckwithii)
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - June
Bent milk-vetch (Astragalus inflexus)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Dry hillsides in shrub-steppe habitat.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Buckwheat milk-vetch (Astragalus caricinus)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in the south-central part of Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Grasslands, dry and sandy slopes in shrub-steppe habitat.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Canada milk-vetch (Astragalus canadensis)
Origin: Native
Chickpea milk-vetch (Astragalus cicer)
Distribution: Scattered locations throughout Washington; distributed throughout much of western North America, and central and eastern Canada.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, often where moist or wet.
Origin: Introduced from Old World
Flowers: July-August
Columbian milk-vetch (Astragalus columbianus)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in the south-central part of Washington; endemic to Washington;
Habitat: Dry, open areas in shrub-steppe.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Crouching milk-vetch (Astragalus succumbens)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington from Kittitas and Grant counties south; Washington south to Umatilla and Gilliam Counties, Oregon.
Habitat: Sagebrush deserts, sandy barrens and lower foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Curve-pod milk-vetch (Astragalus speirocarpus)
Distribution: Endemic to Washington from Kittitas County east to Grant County, south Klickitat County.
Habitat: Sagebrush desert.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Cusick's milk-vetch (Astragalus cusickii)
Distribution: Known only from Asotin County in Washington; Washington south to northeastern Oregon, east to Custer County, Idaho.
Habitat: Sagebrush plains to grassy or rocky slopes, often on talus.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Elegant milk-vetch (Astragalus eucosmus)
Origin: Native
Freckled milk-vetch (Astragalus lentiginosus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Texas.
Habitat: Open areas, desert flats to subalpine slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Geyer's milk-vetch (Astragalus geyeri)
Distribution: Southeast Oregon to California and Nevada, east through the Snake River drainage of Idaho.
Habitat: Sandy desert, especially on dunes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Hairy milk-vetch (Astragalus inflexus)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Dry hillsides in shrub-steppe habitat.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Hanging pod milk-vetch (Astragalus arrectus)
Origin: Native
Hill milk-vetch (Astragalus collinus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades, southern British Columbia south to Oregon, east to west-central Idaho along the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.
Habitat: Basaltic grasslands and sagebrush deserts.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Hillside milk-vetch (Astragalus collinus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades, southern British Columbia south to Oregon, east to west-central Idaho along the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.
Habitat: Basaltic grasslands and sagebrush deserts.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Hood River milk-vetch (Astragalus hoodianus)
Distribution: Columbia River Gorge, Wasco and Hood River Counties in Oregon, Klickitat County in Washington
Habitat: Dry, open areas
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - June
Howell's milk-vetch (Astragalus howellii)
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - June
Leiberg's milk-vetch (Astragalus leibergii)
Distribution: Endemic to Douglas, Kittitas and Chelan counties of central Washington.
Habitat: Dry hillsides and plains, commonly in sagebrush scabland on basalt.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Lesser-bladder milk-vetch (Astragalus microcystis)
Distribution: Northeast Washington and adjacent British Columbia, across Idaho to Montana and Wyoming
Habitat: Prairies and foothills to Ponderosa pine forests
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Longleaf milk-vetch (Astragalus reventus)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to northeastern Oregon.
Habitat: Forest openings at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Lyall's milk-vetch (Astragalus lyallii)
Distribution: Endemic to Washington from Kittitas and Douglas counties south to Benton, east to Grant and Adams counties.
Habitat: Sagebrush and desert areas, especially on sand dunes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Medic milk-vetch (Astragalus speirocarpus)
Distribution: Endemic to Washington from Kittitas County east to Grant County, south Klickitat County.
Habitat: Sagebrush desert.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Palouse milk-vetch (Astragalus arrectus)
Origin: Native
Pauper milk-vetch (Astragalus misellus)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon.
Habitat: Dry, open areas in shrub-steppe.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Piper's milk-vetch (Astragalus riparius)
Distribution: Along the Snake River from the Clearwater to the Tucannon River, Whitman and Columbia Counties, WA, and in Nex Perce County, ID.
Habitat: Dry bluffs and canyon banks.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Purple milk-vetch (Astragalus alpinus)
Distribution: Circumpolar, arctic to sub-alpine regions, south to Okanogan County, WA, the Wallowa Mountains of Oregon, and the Rocky Mountains of Montana and Idaho.
Habitat: Open, often rocky areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Pursh's milk-vetch (Astragalus purshii)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia to California, east to the Dakotas and New Mexico.
Habitat: Prairies and sagebrush deserts, foothills and lower mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Robbins's milk-vetch (Astragalus robbinsii)
Distribution: Alaska and British Columbia south on the east side of the Cascades to Okanogan County, Washington,east to Alberta and south in the Rockies to Colorado.
Habitat: Stream banks and alpine slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Sheldon's milk-vetch (Astragalus sheldonii)
Distribution: Occurring in the southeastern part of Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe and Ponderosa pine forest openings.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Spalding's milk-vetch (Astragalus spaldingii)
Distribution: East of the Cascades, central Washington to northeast Oregon, east to western Idaho.
Habitat: Sagebrush and grasslands in the foothills and valleys.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Specklepod milk-vetch (Astragalus lentiginosus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Texas.
Habitat: Open areas, desert flats to subalpine slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Spiral-pod milk-vetch (Astragalus speirocarpus)
Distribution: Endemic to Washington from Kittitas County east to Grant County, south Klickitat County.
Habitat: Sagebrush desert.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Sprawling milk-vetch (Astragalus succumbens)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington from Kittitas and Grant counties south; Washington south to Umatilla and Gilliam Counties, Oregon.
Habitat: Sagebrush deserts, sandy barrens and lower foothills.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Stalked-pod milk-vetch (Astragalus sclerocarpus)
Distribution: Along the Okanogan and Columbia Rivers from north of Kettle Falls to The Dalles
Habitat: Dunes and sandy barrens, low elevation
Origin: Native
Flowers: June
Standing milk-vetch (Astragalus laxmannii)
Origin: Native
Stiff milk-vetch (Astragalus conjunctus)
Distribution: Wasco County, Oregon, to the Blue Mountains, south along the Malheur River to the Steens, and east into Idaho
Habitat: Drier areas, moderate and higher elevations
Origin: Native
Subarctic milk-vetch (Astragalus australis)
Distribution: Endemic to Olympic Mountains of Washington.
Habitat: Ridge tops and talus slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Thistle milk-vetch (Astragalus kentrophyta)
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Transparent milk-vetch (Astragalus diaphanus)
Distribution: Along the Columbia River from the mouth of the John Day river in Wasco County, Oregon, to Klickitat County, Washington.
Habitat: Gravel bars, alluvial slopes, and in thin gravelly soil overlying basaltic rock.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Tweedy's milk-vetch (Astragalus tweedyi)
Distribution: Yakima County, Washington, south to north-central Oregon near the olumbia dn lower Deschutes Rivers
Habitat: Sagebrush plains and foothills
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Waha milk-vetch (Astragalus arthurii)
Distribution: Occurring in the southeastern corner of Washington; northern foothills of the Wallowa and Blue Mountains in Oregon and Nez Perce County, Idaho.
Habitat: Dry, grassy and rocky meadows, on basalt.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Weedy milk-vetch (Astragalus miser)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern British Columbia and northern Washington east to Alberta and South Dakota, and south in the Rockies to Colorado.
Habitat: Moist meadowlands to open, dry ridges, and in grasslands and foothills to above timberline in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Whited milk-vetch (Astragalus sinuatus)
Distribution: Along Colockum Creek, south of Wenatchee in Chelan County, Washington.
Habitat: Among sagebrush on rocky hillsides.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May
Woody-pod milk-vetch (Astragalus sclerocarpus)
Distribution: Along the Okanogan and Columbia Rivers from north of Kettle Falls to The Dalles
Habitat: Dunes and sandy barrens, low elevation
Origin: Native
Flowers: June
Woollypod milk-vetch (Astragalus purshii)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia to California, east to the Dakotas and New Mexico.
Habitat: Prairies and sagebrush deserts, foothills and lower mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Yakima milk-vetch (Astragalus reventiformis)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to Sherman County in Oregon.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe to low, dry open forests.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Pulse milkvetch (Astragalus tenellus)
Origin: Native
Narrow-leaf milkweed (Asclepias fascicularis)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; east to Idaho and Utah, reaching the coast in Oregon.
Habitat: Uncommon in shrub-steppe, usually along vernal stream beds.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Pallid milkweed (Asclepias cryptoceras)
Distribution: Asotin County, Washington and Grant County, Oregon, to Payette County, Idaho, south to California and Colorado.
Habitat: Gravelly to heavy clay soil in the hills and lower mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - June
Showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa)
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia east to Manitoba, south to Mexico.
Habitat: Open areas at low elevations in dry to moist, loamy to sandy soil
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)
Distribution: Known from Okanogan County in Washington; Washington, also in Idaho, east across North America to Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Riparian zone, including standing water
Origin: Introduced?
Flowers: August
Sea milkwort (Lysimachia maritima)
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; circumboreal; Alaska to California, east to Newfoundland, south in eastern North America to Virginia.
Habitat: Coastal tideflats and saline areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Dusty miller (Artemisia stelleriana)
Distribution: Known from a few locations along the north coast in Washington; known only from Washington in western North America; central Canada and U.S. to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Coastal dunes and beaches.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-September
Millet (Panicum miliaceum)
Distribution: Introduced and cultivated in many parts of the United States; occasionally escaping and persisting in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Abandoned fields, roadsides, waste ground.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July - September
Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum)
Origin: Introduced
Tooth-leaved mimulus (Erythranthe dentata)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Stream banks and other moist places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-September
Apple mint (Mentha suaveolens)
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; Washington to California and Arizona
Habitat: Roadsides, wasteland, and other disturbed sites.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: July-September
Bergamot mint (Mentha aquatica)
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California; central and eastern North America.
Habitat: Lake and pond shores, riparian areas, and wetlands.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-September.
Foxtail mint (Mentha ×villosa)
Origin: Introduced
Water mint (Mentha aquatica)
Distribution: West of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California; central and eastern North America.
Habitat: Lake and pond shores, riparian areas, and wetlands.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-September.
Yellow missionbells (Fritillaria pudica)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Utah.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe to mixed coniferous forests, low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-June
Sitka mistmaiden (Romanzoffia sitchensis)
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to northern California, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Wet cliffs and ledges, usually at mid- to high elevations in the mountains, but descending to near sea level in the Columbia River Gorge.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Tracy's mistmaiden (Romanzoffia tracyi)
Distribution: Along the coast in southwestern Washington; south to northern California.
Habitat: Coastal bluffs and rocks.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-April
Alpine mitrewort (Pectiantia pentandra)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains of Canada and the U.S.
Habitat: Wet meadows and moist woods, especially along streams, lowlands to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Bare-stemmed mitrewort (Mitella nuda)
Distribution: Alaska south to the Cascades of northwest Washington, east to Labrador and south to north-central Montana.
Habitat: Damp woods, along streams and in bogs.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Brewer's mitrewort (Pectiantia breweri)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades Crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Alberta, Montana, Idaho, and Nevada.
Habitat: Moist mountain valleys and open to wooded slopes, from mid-elevations to timberline.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Coastal mitrewort (Pectiantia ovalis)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Deep, moist woods, creek bottoms and wet banks.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-May
Cross-shaped mitrewort (Ozomelis stauropetala)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and Utah.
Habitat: Open to dense moist woods at mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Leafy mitrewort (Mitellastra caulescens)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to northwest California, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Shady woods, wet meadows and swamps, low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Side-flowered mitrewort (Ozomelis stauropetala)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and Utah.
Habitat: Open to dense moist woods at mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Star-shaped mitrewort (Mitellastra caulescens)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to northwest California, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Shady woods, wet meadows and swamps, low to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Three-toothed mitrewort (Ozomelis trifida)
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympic Mountains and on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Alberta, Montana, and Idaho.
Habitat: Moist forests, moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Mock-stawberry (Duchesnea indica)
Distribution: Introduced west of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, and in the east, Nebraska to New York south to Texas to Florida
Habitat: Ornamental, occasionally escapes
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - June
Modesty (Whipplea modesta)
Distribution: West side of the Cascades in the Olympic Mountains; Washington south to California.
Habitat: Dry, rocky, open to lightly forested areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Mole plant (Euphorbia lathyris)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California and Arizona, widely distributed in eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed soil and wasteland.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: April-May
Mountain monardella (Monardella odoratissima)
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; Washington to California, east to Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Open, dry, often rocky places, low deserts to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
California monkey-fiddle (Hesperochiron californicus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; south to California, eastward from Montana to Utah.
Habitat: Mostly in more or less alkaline meadows and flats, in plains, foothills and valleys
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Dwarf monkey-fiddle (Hesperochiron pumilus)
Distribution: East of the Cascade summits in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Utah and Arizona.
Habitat: Meadows and moist, open slopes from the foothills to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Brewer's monkey-flower (Erythranthe breweri)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia to California, east to Montana and Colorado.
Habitat: Dry to moist open woods and meadows at mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Candelabrum monkey-flower (Erythranthe pulsiferae)
Origin: Native
Chickweed monkey-flower (Erythranthe alsinoides)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Shady, vernally (springtime) moist places on cliffs and ledges, especially at low elevations; often growing in moss mats.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Coastal monkey-flower (Erythranthe dentata)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Stream banks and other moist places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-September
Disappearing monkey-flower (Erythranthe inflatula)
Origin: Native
Downy monkey-flower (Mimetanthe pilosa)
Origin: Native
Dwarf purple monkey-flower (Diplacus nanus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Colorado.
Habitat: Open, very dry areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
False monkey-flower (Mimetanthe pilosa)
Origin: Native
Field monkey-flower (Erythranthe arvensis)
Origin: Native
Great purple monkey-flower (Erythranthe lewisii)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Montana, Wyoming and Colorado.
Habitat: Common in wet places at mid- to high elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Large monkey-flower (Erythranthe grandis)
Origin: Native
Large mountain monkey-flower (Erythranthe caespitosa)
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympics and Cascades mountains of Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Wet meadows and wet, rocky slopes at high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Large-nose monkey-flower (Erythranthe nasuta)
Origin: Native
Liverwort monkey-flower (Erythranthe jungermannioides)
Distribution: Known historically from the east end of the Columbia River Gorge in Washington; Washington and Oregon, south along the Deschutes River to Maupin.
Habitat: Moss mats on cliffs.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Miniature monkey-flower (Erythranthe suksdorfii)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Mt Adams south to southern California, east to Colorado and Wyoming.
Habitat: Open, moist to rather dry places, from the valleys and foothills to moderate or occasionally higher elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Nesom's monkey-flower (Diplacus cusickioides)
Distribution: Known only from Klickitat County in Washington; Washington to California, east to Idaho
Habitat: Open, gravelly, dry slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
Primrose monkey-flower (Erythranthe primuloides)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, Arizona and New Mexico, east to Montana and Utah.
Habitat: Wet, boggy areas at mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Pulsifer's monkey-flower (Erythranthe pulsiferae)
Origin: Native
Purple-stem monkey-flower (Erythranthe floribunda)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern British Columbia south to California and east to Montana.
Habitat: Moist open places at moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-October
Scarlet monkey-flower (Erythranthe cardinalis)
Distribution: Only known from a few locations in Washington; Washington south to California, east to the southern Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Streambanks, where escaped from cultivation.
Origin: Introduced?
Flowers: May-August
Seep monkey-flower (Erythranthe guttata)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Dakotas.
Habitat: Wet places, sea level to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-September
Sessile-leaved monkey-flower (Erythranthe ptilota)
Origin: Native
Sharp-leaved monkey-flower (Erythranthe decora)
Origin: Native
Short-flower monkey-flower (Erythranthe breviflora)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming.
Habitat: Moist and wet open areas at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Showy monkey-flower (Erythranthe decora)
Origin: Native
Small-leaved monkey-flower (Erythranthe microphylla)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; central BC to California, east to western Idaho and Nevada.
Habitat: Rocky slopes, wet meadows, streambanks, and seeps.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Snouted monkey-flower (Erythranthe nasuta)
Origin: Native
Stalk-leaved monkey-flower (Erythranthe patula)
Origin: Native
Washington monkey-flower (Erythranthe washingtonensis)
Origin: Native
Wing-stem monkey-flower (Erythranthe alsinoides)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Shady, vernally (springtime) moist places on cliffs and ledges, especially at low elevations; often growing in moss mats.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Allegheny monkeyflower (Mimulus ringens)
Distribution: Occurring along the Columbia and Snake rivers in Washington, where introduced; native to eastern North America.
Habitat: Riparian corridors in open sites, tolerant of episodic or extensive inundation.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August-September
Dwarf purple monkeyflower (Diplacus nanus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana and Colorado.
Habitat: Open, very dry areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Nez Perce monkeyflower (Erythranthe ampliata)
Origin: Native
Sticky monkeyflower (Erythranthe moschata)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains; also in eastern North America.
Habitat: Streambanks, moist meadows and seeps, low to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Yellow monkeyflower (Erythranthe guttata)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Dakotas.
Habitat: Wet places, sea level to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-September
Columbian monkshood (Aconitum columbianum)
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Montana and New Mexico.
Habitat: Moist woods and meadows, moderate to subalpine elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Prostrate monolepis (Blitum spathulatum)
Origin: Native
Montbretia (Crocosmia ×crocosmiiflora)
Origin: Introduced from South Africa
Branching montia (Montia diffusa)
Distribution: West side of the Cascades, southern British Columbia to Marin County, California.
Habitat: Moist woods at low elevation.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - July
Chamisso's montia (Montia chamissoi)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains; scattered locations east of the Mississippi in the U.S.
Habitat: Wet areas, often in water, from the lowlands to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Dwarf montia (Montia dichotoma)
Distribution: Western Washington to northern Casifornia, east to Idaho and western Montana.
Habitat: Moist areas in the lowlands.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - June
Howell's montia (Montia howellii)
Distribution: West of the Cascades, British Columbia to California.
Habitat: Moist lowland areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - May
Narrow-leafed montia (Montia linearis)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of Washington; British Columbia south to Calfornia, east to the Rocky Mountains of Canada and the U.S.
Habitat: Moist to dry, usually sandy soil, low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Sand montia (Claytonia arenicola)
Distribution: Occurring along the eastern border in Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Various habitats, from moist rocks to hillsides to pine woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-June
Sand springbeauty montia (Claytonia arenicola)
Distribution: Occurring along the eastern border in Washington; Washington south to Oregon, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Various habitats, from moist rocks to hillsides to pine woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-June
Water montia (Montia chamissoi)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains; scattered locations east of the Mississippi in the U.S.
Habitat: Wet areas, often in water, from the lowlands to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Common moonwort (Botrychium neolunaria)
Origin: Native
Dainty moonwort (Botrychium crenulatum)
Distribution: East Cascades in northern Washington; British Columbia to California, east to Montana and Arizona
Habitat: Mesic meadows, fen margins, and streamsides under Thuja plicata, at montane elevations.
Origin: Native
Spores: June-August
Green triangle moonwort (Botrychium viride)
Origin: Native
Least moonwort (Botrychium simplex)
Origin: Native
Michigan moonwort (Botrychium michiganense)
Distribution: Scattered in Western North America and eastward to the Great Lakes; in Washington known from the northeast corner of the state.
Habitat: Mesic montane meadows.
Origin: Native
Mingan moonwort (Botrychium minganense)
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Colorado and to Maine across the northern tier of states
Origin: Native
Mountain moonwort (Botrychium montanum)
Distribution: British Columbia to California, east to Montana
Origin: Native
Northwestern moonwort (Botrychium pinnatum)
Distribution: Alaska to Washington and the Wallowa Mountains of Oregon
Habitat: Moist or wet, mostly open places at fairly high elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Paradox moonwort (Botrychium paradoxum)
Origin: Native
Red triangle moonwort (Botrychium lanceolatum)
Distribution: Circumboreal, extending south to southern Washington and Pennsylvania
Habitat: Moist or wet places in the mountains, occasionally to high elevations
Origin: Native
Scalloped moonwort (Botrychium crenulatum)
Distribution: East Cascades in northern Washington; British Columbia to California, east to Montana and Arizona
Habitat: Mesic meadows, fen margins, and streamsides under Thuja plicata, at montane elevations.
Origin: Native
Spores: June-August
St. John (Botrychium pinnatum)
Distribution: Alaska to Washington and the Wallowa Mountains of Oregon
Habitat: Moist or wet, mostly open places at fairly high elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Stalked moonwort (Botrychium pedunculosum)
Origin: Native
Triangle moonwort (Botrychium lanceolatum)
Distribution: Circumboreal, extending south to southern Washington and Pennsylvania
Habitat: Moist or wet places in the mountains, occasionally to high elevations
Origin: Native
Two-spiked moonwort (Botrychium paradoxum)
Origin: Native
Upswept moonwort (Botrychium ascendens)
Origin: Native
Western moonwort (Botrychium hesperium)
Origin: Native
Beach morning-glory (Calystegia soldanella)
Distribution: Along the coast in Washington; British Columbia south to San Diego County, California.
Habitat: Coastal beaches and sand dunes, often extending down to the high tide level.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-September
Night-blooming morning-glory (Calystegia atriplicifolia)
Origin: Native
Seaside morning-glory (Calystegia soldanella)
Distribution: Along the coast in Washington; British Columbia south to San Diego County, California.
Habitat: Coastal beaches and sand dunes, often extending down to the high tide level.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-September
Stag (Lycopodium clavatum)
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California in western North America; circumboreal.
Habitat: Moist coniferous woods and swamps.
Origin: Native
Spores: Produces spores April-October
Alaskan moss-heather (Harrimanella stelleriana)
Distribution: Alaska to the high Cascades of Washington
Habitat: Rocky slopes and seeps, alpine to subalpine
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Four-angled moss-heather (Cassiope tetragona)
Distribution: Alaska to Washington, also in Montana
Habitat: Open, rocky areas in the alpine and subalpine
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Mertens's moss-heather (Cassiope mertensiana)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Montana, Idaho, and Nevada.
Habitat: Open, rocky areas in the alpine and subalpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Mother-of-the-evening (Hesperis matronalis)
Distribution: Scattered locations on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; distributed throughout North America except for the southern portion of the U.S.
Habitat: Sometimes escaping and persisting on waste ground.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May-June
Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca)
Distribution: Scattered location in Washington; found occasionally in North America.
Habitat: Disturbed ground, often in association with cities and towns.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: June-September
Rocky Mountain (Elodea canadensis)
Distribution: Throughout most of the United States
Habitat: Common in slow-moving, often alkaline water, in the Pacific Northwest
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Wenatchee Mountain (Rudbeckia alpicola)
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Cascade mountain-ash (Sorbus scopulina)
Distribution: Alaska south to California, east to the Dakotas and Colorado.
Habitat: Open areas, from the foothils to sub-alpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - Early July
European mountain-ash (Sorbus aucuparia)
Distribution: Introduced, commonly planted species, spread by birds, near habitations.
Habitat: Often in areas where it appears to be native.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - June
Western mountain-ash (Sorbus scopulina)
Distribution: Alaska south to California, east to the Dakotas and Colorado.
Habitat: Open areas, from the foothils to sub-alpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - Early July
Hooker's mountain-avens (Dryas hookeriana)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to Washington, northeast Oregon, and in the Rockies from Montana to Colorado.
Habitat: Open, rocky areas, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
White mountain-avens (Dryas hookeriana)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to Washington, northeast Oregon, and in the Rockies from Montana to Colorado.
Habitat: Open, rocky areas, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Yellow mountain-avens (Dryas drummondii)
Distribution: Alaska south to the northern Cascades and Selkirk Mountains of Washington, the Wallowa Mountains of Oregon, and the Rocky Mountains of Idaho and Montana
Habitat: High mountains, often above timberline, but down to lower elevations along streams
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - Early July
Pink mountain-heath (Phyllodoce empetriformis)
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Alberta and Wyoming; in the Olympics and Cascades in Washington
Habitat: Rocky sites in high coniferous forests to alpine meadows
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Yellow mountain-heath (Phyllodoce glanduliflora)
Distribution: Occurring in mountainous areas across Washington; Alaska south to Oregon, east to Wyoming.
Habitat: Rocky sites in high coniferous forests to alpine meadows and seeps.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Alaskan mountain-heather (Harrimanella stelleriana)
Distribution: Alaska to the high Cascades of Washington
Habitat: Rocky slopes and seeps, alpine to subalpine
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Club-moss mountain-heather (Cassiope lycopodioides)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to Washington.
Habitat: Alpine rocky slopes and crevices.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Clubmoss mountain-heather (Cassiope lycopodioides)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to Washington.
Habitat: Alpine rocky slopes and crevices.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Little mountain-ricegrass (Piptatheropsis exigua)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern British Columbia, south east of the Cascade crest to Oregon, east to Montana and Colorado.
Habitat: Sandy to rocky soil, mountain meadows to subalpine and alpine ridges and slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Mountain-sorrel (Oxyria digyna)
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Montana, Colorado and New Mexico; also across Canada to Labrador, and the Olympics in Washington
Habitat: Moist, usually rocky ground, alpine to subalpine
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late June - August
Bristle-flower mountain-trumpet (Collomia macrocalyx)
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Diffuse mountain-trumpet (Collomia tenella)
Distribution: Mostly east of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to Nevada, east to Idaho, Utah and Wyoming.
Habitat: Dry, open places from the plains to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
Large-flower mountain-trumpet (Collomia grandiflora)
Distribution: Widely distributed on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to California, east to Wyoming.
Habitat: Rather dry, open to lightly wooded areas, lowlands to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Narrow-leaf mountain-trumpet (Collomia linearis)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Ontario and New Mexico.
Habitat: Dry to somewhat moist, open or lightly shaded areas in the lowlands to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Variable-leaf mountain-trumpet (Collomia heterophylla)
Distribution: Occurring mostly west of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Woods, forest openings and stream banks, low to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Yellow-staining mountain-trumpet (Collomia tinctoria)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California, east to central Idaho and southeast Oregon.
Habitat: Dry, open places in the foothills to moderate or mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Gray mouse ear (Cerastium brachypetalum)
Origin: Introduced
Common mouse-ear chickweed (Cerastium fontanum)
Distribution: Introduced and common in most of Canada and the United States; more common east of the Cascades
Habitat: Disturbed ground, lawns and gardens
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: March - September
Doubtful mouse-ear chickweed (Dichodon viscidum)
Origin: Introduced
Field mouse-ear chickweed (Cerastium arvense)
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades and in the Blue Mountains in Washington. Widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Coastal cliffs to inland valleys, rocky hillsides, subalpine meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-August
Nodding mouse-ear chickweed (Cerastium nutans)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to Oregon, south in the Rocky Mountains to New Mexico and Arizona, east to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Dry to moist banks and woodlands.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Sticky mouse-ear chickweed (Cerastium glomeratum)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington, but more common west of the Cascades crest; occurring throughout western and eastern North America.
Habitat: Low elevations in disturbed ground.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: March-June
Bristly mouse-tail (Myosurus apetalus)
Distribution: East side of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, east to Wyoming
Habitat: Moist areas and vernal streambeds, mostly low elevation grasslands and sagebrush, occasionally to subalpine
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late March - early June
Sedge mouse-tail (Myosurus apetalus)
Distribution: East side of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, east to Wyoming
Habitat: Moist areas and vernal streambeds, mostly low elevation grasslands and sagebrush, occasionally to subalpine
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late March - early June
Shortstemmed mouse-tail (Myosurus sessilis)
Distribution: Known from Klickitat County in Washington; South-central Washington south to north-central Oregon, also in central California.
Habitat: Vernal pools.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Vernal pool mouse-tail (Myosurus sessilis)
Distribution: Known from Klickitat County in Washington; South-central Washington south to north-central Oregon, also in central California.
Habitat: Vernal pools.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Alpine mousetail (Ivesia gordonii)
Distribution: Mt. Adams, Wenatchee and Blue Mountains in Washington; Blue and Wallowa Mountains in Oregon; Montana to Colorado in the Rockies, west to California
Habitat: Floodplains and riverbanks to alpine ridges and talus
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late June - August
Tiny mousetail (Myosurus minimus)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to south-central Canada and across the central U.S. to the southeastern states.
Habitat: Wet places, especially vernal pools.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Tweedy's mousetail (Ivesia tweedyi)
Distribution: East of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Dry, open to wooded areas, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Blue Mt.milk-vetch (Astragalus reventus)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to northeastern Oregon.
Habitat: Forest openings at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Mud-midget (Wolffiella gladiata)
Origin: Introduced from eastern United States
Grassleaf mud-plantain (Heteranthera dubia)
Distribution: In scattered localities in Washington, however locally common and abundant in lower Yakima River; British Columbia south to California, widespread in eastern North America.
Habitat: Quiet streams, ponds and lakes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Awl-leaf mudwort (Limosella aquatica)
Distribution: Widespread in the Northern Hemisphere; found throughout the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: In shallow water or wet mud, in the valleys and plains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - October
Stemless mudwort (Limosella acaulis)
Origin: Native
Aleutian mugwort (Artemisia tilesii)
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympic and Cascade Mountains of Washington; Alaska to Oregon, east to Montana and across Canada.
Habitat: Open rocky or gravelly, wet or dry sites, mostly at high elevations in the mountains, descending to sea level northward.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Coastal mugwort (Artemisia suksdorfii)
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington, British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Bluffs and rocky or sandy beaches, less commonly in other low, open places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Douglas mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana)
Distribution: Occurring in Washington chiefly east of the Cascades crest, but also on the west side; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Mostly along stream banks and river bottoms.
Origin: Native
Flowers: August-September
Michaux's mugwort (Artemisia michauxiana)
Distribution: British Columbia to California, east to Alberta and Wyoming.
Habitat: Rocky places in the mountains at rather high elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - August
Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris)
Distribution: Introduced from Europe, now established in most of eastern United States and adjacent Canada; uncommon in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Waste areas and disturbed soil.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: August - October
Three-forked mugwort (Artemisia furcata)
Distribution: Occurring in the Cascades and Olympic Mountains of Washington; Alaska south to Washington, east to Northwest Territories, Alberta, and Nunavut.
Habitat: Open, rocky ledges and talus slopes at high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Western mugwort (Artemisia ludoviciana)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; distributed widely throughout North America.
Habitat: Fairly dry areas from the foothills to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-October
Annual muhly (Muhlenbergia minutissima)
Origin: Native
Flowers: July
Foxtail muhly (Muhlenbergia andina)
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - September
Green muhly (Muhlenbergia racemosa)
Origin: Native
Flowers: August - September
Least muhly (Muhlenbergia minutissima)
Origin: Native
Flowers: July
Matted muhly (Muhlenbergia richardsonis)
Distribution: British Columbia south, east of the Cascade crests, to Baja California, east to New Brunswick and New Mexico.
Habitat: Moist to dry lowlands, meadows, mountain prairies and rocky slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Or alkali muhly (Muhlenbergia asperifolia)
Distribution: British Columbia south, east of the Cascades, to California, east to Montana and Texas.
Habitat: Dry to moist alkaline places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - September
Pull-up muhly (Muhlenbergia filiformis)
Distribution: British Columbia south to California, east to Alberta and New Mexico.
Habitat: Usually near warm springs or seepage areas, in moist meadows of mountain valleys to subalpine slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Spiked muhly (Muhlenbergia glomerata)
Origin: Native
Wirestem muhly (Muhlenbergia mexicana)
Origin: Native
White mulberry (Morus alba)
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; widely established throughout North America.
Habitat: Disturbed ground, waste areas; commonly established along riparian zones of rivers and streams.
Origin: Introduced from Asia
Flowers: April-June
Flannel mullein (Verbascum thapsus)
Distribution: Distributed widely throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Common on open, disturbed ground, roadsides and logged areas in the mountains.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: June-September
Great mullein (Verbascum thapsus)
Distribution: Distributed widely throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Common on open, disturbed ground, roadsides and logged areas in the mountains.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: June-September
Hoary mullein (Verbascum pulverulentum)
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Moth mullein (Verbascum blattaria)
Distribution: Ocurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; introduced over most of the United States.
Habitat: Open areas in waste ground, tolerant of moist to dry.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-September
Turkey mullein (Croton setigerus)
Distribution: East of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Baja California.
Habitat: Chiefly in semi-desert conditions, but to the coast in California.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Wand mullein (Verbascum virgatum)
Distribution: Lowland western Washington; Washington south to California, east across the southern U.S. and in eastern North America.
Habitat: Open disturbed areas at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-August
Musk-flower (Erythranthe moschata)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains; also in eastern North America.
Habitat: Streambanks, moist meadows and seeps, low to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Musk-plant (Erythranthe moschata)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains; also in eastern North America.
Habitat: Streambanks, moist meadows and seeps, low to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Ball mustard (Neslia paniculata)
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to Washington, east across Canada and the northern U.S. to the Atlantic Ocean.
Habitat: Disturbed areas including fields, roadsides, and forest openings.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: May-June
Black mustard (Brassica nigra)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Distrubed areas such as roadsides, fields, and waste lots.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-August
Blue mustard (Chorispora tenella)
Distribution: Chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of western and central North America.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe habitat, both degraded and intact; disturbed areas, roadsides, and pastures.
Origin: Introduced from sw Asia
Flowers: March-June
Brown mustard (Brassica juncea)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas including fields, roadsides and wastelots.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-July
California mustard (Caulanthus lasiophyllus)
Origin: Native
Common mustard (Brassica rapa)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Distrubed areas such as roadsides, fields, and waste lots.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April-June
Corn mustard (Sinapis arvensis)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Waste places and other disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced from the Mediterranean region, reaching North America perhaps as early as 8000 years bp (Jacobson et al. 1988)
Flowers: May-June
Dog mustard (Erucastrum gallicum)
Distribution: Weedy introduction from central Europe, fairly common in eastern United States; found in a few scattered locations in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Waste areas and disturbed soil.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May - July
Field mustard (Brassica rapa)
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Distrubed areas such as roadsides, fields, and waste lots.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April-June
Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata)
Distribution: Currently restricted to a few counties west of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to Utah, east across Canada and the U.S. to the Atlantic Coast.
Habitat: Disturbed soil and waste ground.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April-June
Hare's-ear mustard (Conringia orientalis)
Distribution: In scattered locations across Washington; distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Roadsides and waste places.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-August
Hedge mustard (Sisymbrium officinale)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Waste ground and other disturbed areas at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: March-September
Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissimum)
Distribution: Distributed throughout Washington but more common east of the Cascades; occurring throughout North America.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe, grasslands, and waste ground, especially following rangeland fires.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-September
Leaf mustard (Brassica juncea)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas including fields, roadsides and wastelots.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-July
Long-beaked fiddle mustard (Streptanthella longirostris)
Distribution: Occurring in south-central Washington; Washington south to California, east to Wyoming and New Mexico.
Habitat: Open desert and sagebrush slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Mediterranean hoary mustard (Hirschfeldia incana)
Origin: Introduced
Rush mustard (Sisymbrium linifolium)
Distribution: East of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Arizona (not including California), east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Sagebrush-steppe communities, rock crevices.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Short-podded mustard (Hirschfeldia incana)
Origin: Introduced
Summer mustard (Hirschfeldia incana)
Origin: Introduced
Syrian mustard (Euclidium syriacum)
Distribution: In scattered locations east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; also in Massachusetts.
Habitat: Weed of roadsides and ditch banks.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-June
Tower mustard (Turritis glabra)
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; British Columbia south to northern California, east to the Rocky Mountain states.
Habitat: Seasonally moist, sometimes rocky, soil in open woods, clearings, and grassy balds.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Treacle mustard (Conringia orientalis)
Distribution: In scattered locations across Washington; distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Roadsides and waste places.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-August
Treacle mustard (Erysimum cheiranthoides)
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas including fields, roadsides and wastelots, often where moist.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: June-August
Tumble mustard (Sisymbrium altissimum)
Distribution: Distributed throughout Washington but more common east of the Cascades; occurring throughout North America.
Habitat: Shrub-steppe, grasslands, and waste ground, especially following rangeland fires.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: May-September
White mustard (Sinapis alba)
Distribution: Reported from Whitman County in Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Waste ground near fields.
Origin: Introduced from the Mediterranean region
Flowers: May-June
Wild mustard (Sinapis arvensis)
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Waste places and other disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced from the Mediterranean region, reaching North America perhaps as early as 8000 years bp (Jacobson et al. 1988)
Flowers: May-June
Muttongrass (Poa fendleriana)
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - August