Rosaceae
Rose Family
40 genera
157 species
45 subspecies and varieties
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Agrimonia gryposepalatall hairy grooveburr
Origin: Native
Alchemilla vulgariscommon lady's-mantle
Origin: Introduced
Amelanchier alnifoliasaskatoon, serviceberry; saskatoon, Cusick's serviceberry, Saskatoon serviceberry, western serviceberry, humptulips western seviceberry
Distribution: Occurring throughout Washington; Alaska to California, east to the Dakotas and New Mexico.
Habitat: Open woods, canyons and hillsides, sea level to subalpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Amelanchier utahensisUtah serviceberry
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Baja California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Rimrock, valleys, gullies and hillsides, from sagebrush desert to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Aphanes arvensiswestern lady's-mantle, field parsley-piert
Distribution: Southern British Columbia south east of the Cascades to California; common in eastern United States.
Habitat: Weed of open fields and wooded slopes.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April - May
Aphanes australissmall-fruited parsley-piert
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Washington, also in southeastern U.S.
Habitat: Disturbed, open areas at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: March-May
Aphanes occidentalisparsley-piert
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to California.
Habitat: Vernally moist areas, including rassy balds, meadows, and disturbed, open sites generally at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Aronia melanocarpablack chokeberry
Origin: Introduced
Aruncus dioicus
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California.
Habitat: Moist woods, low to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
var. acuminatus – Sylvan goatsbeard
Cercocarpus ledifolius
Distribution: Southeast Washington; Washington south Oregon to Arizona, east to Montana and Colorado.
Habitat: Dry areas, foothills to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
var. intermontanus – birchleaf mountain-mahogany
var. ledifolius – mountain mahogany
Comarum palustremarsh cinquefoil, purple marshlocks
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout much of Washington; Alaska east across Canada to the Atlantic Coast, south to California and east across the northern half of the U.S.
Habitat: Bogs, wet meadows and lake margins, sea level to subalpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Cotoneaster dammeribearberry cotoneaster
Origin: Introduced from China
Cotoneaster dielsianusDiel's cotoneaster
Origin: Introduced from China
Cotoneaster divaricatusspreading cotoneaster
Origin: Introduced from China
Cotoneaster franchetiifranchet's cotoneaster, orange cotoneaster
Distribution: Distributed west of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California
Habitat: Lowland forest edges, grassy balds, disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced from China
Flowers: May-June
Cotoneaster gambleitree cotoneaster
Cotoneaster horizontalisrock cotoneaster, rockspray cotoneaster, wall cotoneaster
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest at low elevations in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon; also in Ontario, Canada.
Habitat: Fields, forest openings, and disturbed areas typically at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced from China
Flowers: May-June
Cotoneaster lacteuslate cotoneaster, milk-flower cotoneaster
Distribution: Occurring in lowland western Washington; British Columbia to California.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, thickets, and forest margins.
Origin: Introduced from China
Flowers: May-July
Cotoneaster lucidusshiny cotoneaster
Origin: Introduced from Siberia & Mongolia
Cotoneaster nitensfew-flowered cotoneaster
Origin: Introduced from China
Cotoneaster rehderibullate cotoneaster, puckered-leaf cotoneaster
Origin: Introduced from China.
Cotoneaster salicifoliuswillow-leaved cotoneaster
Origin: Introduced from China
Cotoneaster simonsiiHimalayan cotoneaster, Simon's cotoneaster
Origin: Introduced from the Himalayas
Cotoneaster tengyuehensisTengyueh cotoneaster
Origin: Introduced from China
Crataegus castlegarensisCastlegar hawthorn
Origin: Native
Crataegus chrysocarpafireberry hawthorn, Piper's hawthorn
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to Oregon, east to the Atlantic.
Habitat: Thickets, dry slopes, shrub-steppe, riparian zones, open forests.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Crataegus douglasiiblack hawthorn, Douglas' hawthorn
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades, Alaska to California, east to Utah and Wyoming, and across the northern states to Michigan
Habitat: Moist to dry areas, lowlands to moderate elevations
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Crataegus gaylussaciahuckleberry hawthorn, Suksdorf hawthorn, Suksdorf's hawthorn
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska to California, east to Montana and Idaho.
Habitat: Openings and forest margins at low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Crataegus laevigatamidland hawthorn, woodland hawthorn
Origin: Introduced from northern Europe
Crataegus macracanthalarge-thorned hawthorn, western large-thorned hawthorn
Origin: Native
Crataegus monogyna
var. monogyna – common hawthorn, English hawthorn, one-seeded hawthorn
Crataegus okanaganensisOkanagan hawthorn
Origin: Native
Crataegus okennoniiO'Kennon's hawthorn
Origin: Native
Crataegus phaenopyrumWashington thorn
Origin: Introduced
Crataegus phippsiiPhipps\\\' hawthorn
Origin: Native
Crataegus tenuior
Origin: Native
Dasiphora fruticosashrubby cinquefoil
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to New Jersey.
Habitat: Lower foothills to subalpine slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Dryas drummondii
Distribution: Alaska south to the northern Cascades and Selkirk Mountains of Washington, the Wallowa Mountains of Oregon, and the Rocky Mountains of Idaho and Montana
Habitat: High mountains, often above timberline, but down to lower elevations along streams
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - Early July
var. drummondii – yellow mountain-avens
Dryas hookerianawhite dryas, Hooker's mountain-avens, white mountain-avens
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to Washington, northeast Oregon, and in the Rockies from Montana to Colorado.
Habitat: Open, rocky areas, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-September
Drymocallis convallariacordilleran drymocallis
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska to Oregon, Nevada, and Arizona, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Meadows, forest openings, and grassy slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Drymocallis glandulosa
Distribution: In Washington from the coast to mid elevations in the mountains; south to California and east to Montana.
Habitat: Open, mesic areas from coastal meadows to forest openings.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
var. glandulosa – gland cinquefoil, sticky cinquefoil
Drymocallis pseudorupestris
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Alberta, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, and Nevada.
Habitat: Hillsides, dry slopes, forest openings.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
var. saxicola – cliff drymocallis
Duchesnea indicaIndian-strawberry, mock-stawberry
Distribution: Introduced west of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, and in the east, Nebraska to New York south to Texas to Florida
Habitat: Ornamental, occasionally escapes
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - June
Filipendula occidentalisqueen-of-the-forest
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Fragaria chiloensisbeach strawberry, coastal strawberry, cultivated strawberry
Distribution: Along the coast from Alaska to California, and the shores of some Puget Sound islands
Habitat: Strictly maritime
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - June
Fragaria vesca
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout North America.
Habitat: Moist woods, stream banks and sandy meadows, low to mid-elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
var. bracteata – strawberry, wood strawberry
var. crinita – Pacific strawberry
Fragaria virginiana
Distribution: Distributed widely throughout Washington except in sagebrush areas; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Open woods to gravelly meadows in the plains and lower mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
ssp. platypetala – broadpetal strawberry
var. glauca – blueleaf strawberry, wild strawberry
Geum aleppicumyellow avens
Distribution: Occasional east of the Cascades, British Columbia to California, more common east of the Rockies in southern Canada.
Habitat: Along streams and in marshy or damp woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Geum macrophyllum
Distribution: Both sides of the Cascades, Alaska to Baja California, east through Canada to Nova Scotia
Habitat: Common in moist woods and meadows from sea level to subalpine
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - August
var. macrophyllum – bigleaf avens, largeleaved avens
var. perincisum – largeleaved avens
Geum rivalepurple avens, water avens
Distribution: British Columbia and Okanogan County, Washington, east to Alberta, south in the Rocky Mountains to New Mexico.
Habitat: Stream banks, lake shores, bogs and wet meadows, at high elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: Late June - July
Geum rossiiRoss's avens
Distribution: In Washington known only from the Wenatchee Mountains; Alaska and northern Canada south in Rocky and Cascades mountains to Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico; also in Far East Russia and Greenland.
Habitat: Arctic tundra, high gravelly meadows and scree slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June- August
Geum triflorum
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; widespread throughout the northern and western regions of North America.
Habitat: Moister places in the sagebrush plains and foothills to subalpine ridges.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-August
var. campanulatum – old man's whiskers
var. ciliatum – prairie smoke, old-man's whiskers
Geum urbanumherb-bennet
Distribution: In scattered locations on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon and Utah; also occurring in northeastern U.S.
Habitat: Disturbed areas in including, roadsides, wastelots, and fields.
Origin: Introduced?
Flowers: May-September
Holodiscus discolorcreambush ocean-spray, hillside oceanspray
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to south California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Gravelly soil in open, dry to moist woods, coastal bluffs to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Horkelia fusca
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho and Wyoming.
Habitat: Damp meadows to open forest and rocky slopes, moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
var. capitata – horkelia
var. fusca – horkelia, tawny horkelia
Ivesia gordoniigordon's ivesia, alpine mousetail
Distribution: Mt. Adams, Wenatchee and Blue Mountains in Washington; Blue and Wallowa Mountains in Oregon; Montana to Colorado in the Rockies, west to California.
Habitat: Floodplains and riverbanks to alpine ridges and talus.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June_August
Ivesia tweedyiTweedy's mousetail
Distribution: East of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Dry, open to wooded areas, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Luetkea pectinatalutkea, partridgefoot
Distribution: Occurring in the Olympics and Cascades mountains in Washington; Alaska south to California, and in the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Usually on sandy soil in moist or shady places, subalpine to alpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Malus dawsonianaDawson apple
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Washington south to Oregon.
Habitat: Fields, roadsides, wastelots, and abandoned homesteads.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Malus ×domesticaapple, cultivated apple
Distribution: In scattered locations in Washington;
Habitat: Disturbed areas, often where escaped from cultivation.
Origin: Introduced from Eurasia
Flowers: April-June
Malus fuscaOregon crabapple, western crabapple
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California.
Habitat: Moist woods, swamps and open canyons from sea level to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Malus pumilacultivated apple
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Forested edges and openings, fields, roadsides, abandoned homesteads, and other disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April-June
Malus pumilacultivated apple
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Forested edges and openings, fields, roadsides, abandoned homesteads, and other disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April-June
Oemleria cerasiformisoso-berry, osoberry
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades in Washington and along the Columbia River Gorge: British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Moist to fairly dry, open woods at low elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-April
Petrophytum caespitosumRocky Mountain rockmat
ssp. caespitosum – Rocky Mountain rockmat
Petrophytum cinerascensChelan rockmat
Distribution: Endemic to Columbia River region of central Washington.
Habitat: Basaltic cliffs.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Petrophytum hendersoniiOlympic Mountain rockmat
Distribution: Endemic to (only occurring in) the Olympic Mountains of Washington.
Habitat: Rocky cliffs and talus slopes at mid- to high elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Photinia davidianaChinese redtip, stranvaesia
Origin: Introduced from China
Photinia villosaoriental redtip
Origin: Introduced from China
Physocarpus capitatusPacific ninebark
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington, but found chiefly on the west side; Alaska south to California, east to Alberta and Idaho.
Habitat: Moist woods and swamps in the lower mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-June
Physocarpus malvaceusmallow ninebark, mallow-leaf ninebark
Distribution: East of the Cascades, British Columbia to Oregon, east to Alberta and Montana, and south to Utah and Wyoming
Habitat: Canyons and hillsides, grasslands, ponderosa pine and Douglas fir forests
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Potentilla anserina
Distribution: Widely distributed across Washington; distributed across much of North America except south-central and southeastern U.S.
Habitat: Wet, alkaline areas from coast to arid inlands.
Flowers: April-August
ssp. anserina – silvery cinquefoil, common silverweed
ssp. pacifica – Pacific silverweed
Potentilla argenteahoary cinquefoil, silver cinquefoil
Distribution: Introduced and established in eastern United states and southern Canada; northeast Washington and a few places in Idaho.
Habitat: Sandy or gravely soil.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June - July
Potentilla biennisbiennial cinquefoil
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Yukon Territories south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains; also in South Dakota.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, typically where moist to wet.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Potentilla breweriBrewer's cinquefoil
Distribution: Mountains of central and southeast Oregon and northern California; occasional in the Wenatchee Mountains of Washington.
Habitat: Moist meadows and stream banks to open slopes, mid- to high elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Potentilla drummondiiDrummond's cinquefoil
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Alberta, Montana and Utah; in the Olympic and Cascade Mountains of Washington
Habitat: Forest openings, meadows and high ridges, mid- to high elevations in the mountains
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Potentilla flabellifoliafan-leaf cinquefoil, fringe-leaf cinquefoil, fan-foil
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to California and Nevada, east to Alberta, Montana and Wyoming.
Habitat: Common in moist meadows, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Potentilla glaucophylla
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Moist alpine and subalpine meadows, and along stream banks in high mountain forests.
Flowers: June-August
var. glaucophylla – blueleaf cinquefoil, different-leaved cinquefoil, diverse-leaved cinquefoil, vari-leaved cinquefoil
var. perdissecta – blueleaf cinquefoil, vari-leaved cinquefoil
Potentilla gracilis
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Saskatchewan and the Dakotas.
Habitat: Varied habitats; moderately saline soil, grasslands, moist areas in shrub-steppe, forested mountains and subalpine meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
var. elmeri – comb-leaf cinquefoil, Elmer's cinquefoil
var. fastigiata – Hall's cinquefoil, slender cinquefoil
var. flabelliformis – Idaho cinquefoil
var. gracilis – slender cinquefoil, wooly cinquefoil
Potentilla inclinatagrey cinquefoil
Origin: Introduced from central and southern Europe
Potentilla jepsoniiJepson's cinquefoil
Origin: Native
Potentilla newberryiNewberry's cinquefoil
Origin: Native
Flowers: April - July
Potentilla niveasnow cinquefoil
Distribution: Alaska to British Columbia, east to Quebec, south in the Rocky Mountains to Colorado.
Habitat: Arctic tundra and gravel bars to alpine slopes and meadows.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
Potentilla norvegicaNorwegian cinquefoil, rough cinquefoil
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Usually in moist soil, often along irrigation ditches or in waste places.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-August
Potentilla ovina
Origin: Native
Potentilla rectasulphur cinquefoil
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout most of North America.
Habitat: Roadsides, trails, disturbed ground.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-July
Potentilla rivalisbrook cinquefoil
Distribution: British Columbia south, east of the Cascades in Washington, down the Columbia River Gorge and the Willamette Valley to southwest Oregon and coastal California, east to Minnesota and New Mexico.
Habitat: Damp soil, especially along rivers and around lakes, ponds, and swamps.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - September
Potentilla supina
Distribution: In scattered locations in Washington, mostly east of the Cascades; British Columbia south to Texas, east to northeastern U.S.
Habitat: Sandy stream banks, lake shores, and moist flats.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
ssp. paradoxa – bushy cinquefoil
Potentilla villosanorthern cinquefoil, villous cinquefoil
Distribution: Occurring in the North Cascades, Olympic Mountains, and at Mt. Rainier in Washington; Alaska to Oregon.
Habitat: Arctic tundra to alpine ridges, talus slopes and rock crevices.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-September
Poteridium annuumprairie burnet
Origin: Introduced
Poteridium occidentaleannual burnet
Distribution: Occurring chiefly east of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains; also in parts of central and eastern U.S. and Canada.
Habitat: Forest edge, meadows, sagebrush, and open hillsides, often where seasonally moist.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Poterium sanguisorba
Distribution: Chiefly west of the Cascades in Washington; occurring in many areas of North America.
Habitat: Waste places.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-August
var. polygamum – burnet bloodwort, fodder burnet, salad burnet
Prunus americanaAmerican plum, wild plum
Distribution: Northeast Canada and United States, occasionally west to Montana and Utah; rare in Washington.
Habitat: Along watercourses, and on open or wooded, moist or dry areas from the plains into the lower mountains.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April - May
Prunus aviumsweet cherry
Distribution: Distributed widely throughout Washington; widely distributed throughout much of North America.
Habitat: Forest edges, fields, wastelots, and other disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April-May
Prunus cerasiferacherry plum
Distribution: Introduced and escaped, mostly in Western Washington, but also in southeast Washington.
Habitat: Open, disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: March-April
Prunus cerasussour cherry
Origin: Introduced
Prunus domesticacultivated plum
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades in Washington; Washington south to California, east to Idaho and Utah; in scattered locations of central and northeastern U.S.
Habitat: Fields, roadsides, forest openings, abandoned homesteads, and other disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: March-May
Prunus dulcisalmond
Distribution: Escaped from cultivation sporadically in western North America. Native to Asia.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, riparian zones.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: March-May
Prunus emarginatabitter cherry
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Moist woods or somewhat moist places in shrub-steppe, sea level to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Prunus laurocerasuslaurel cherry, cherry-laurel
Distribution: Introduced ornamental, occasionally escaping west of the Cascades in Washington.
Habitat: Waste areas.
Origin: Introduced
Prunus lusitanicaPortugal laurel
Origin: Introduced
Prunus mahalebmahaleb cherry, perfumed cherry
Distribution: Introduced species used as budding stock for cherries, sometimes escaping.
Habitat: Disturbed soil.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - June
Prunus padusEuropean bird cherry
Distribution: Introduced in Alaska and in Pennsylvania and a few neighboring states in eastern United States
Habitat: Ornamental, occasionally escapes
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May
Prunus persicapeach
Origin: Introduced
Prunus ×pugetensisPuget Sound cherry
Distribution: Southwestern B.C through Puget Trough of Washington.
Habitat: Low elevations in forests or forest edges, or disturbed areas, typically where both parent species are present.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-May
Prunus spinosablackthorn
Distribution: Introduced and escaping in southeast Washington and adjacent Idaho, also in western Oregon.
Habitat: Moist draws and hillsides.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April
Prunus tomentosa
Origin: Introduced
Prunus virginiana
Distribution: Alaska, Canada and much of the United States
Habitat: Foothills and lowlands, more common in drier areas
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - Early July
var. demissa – common chokecherry
var. melanocarpa – western chokecherry, white chokecherry
Purshia tridentataantelope-brush, bitterbrush
Distribution: Widely distributed east of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Montana, Colorado and New Mexico.
Habitat: Sagebrush desert and shrub-steppe to ponderosa pine forests.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-June
Pyracantha coccineafirethorn, scarlet firethorn
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations across Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to the Atlantic Coast along the southern half of the U.S.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, wastelots, and forest margins often near towns and cities where escaped from cultivation.
Origin: Introduced from southern Europe
Flowers: May-June
Pyrus calleryanaCallery pear
Distribution: Occurring in scattered locations in lowland western Washington; occurring in eastern and southeastern U.S.
Habitat: Forest edges where previously disturbed.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April-May
Pyrus communiscommon pear
Origin: Introduced
Pyrus nivalis
Origin: Introduced
Rosa caninadog rose
Distribution: Introduced at low elevations west of the Cascades, and in Idaho
Habitat: Roadside thickets.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - June
Rosa eglanteriasweetbrier rose
Distribution: Introduced chiefly west of the Cascades, and in eastern United states.
Habitat: Roadsides and pastures, occasionally in more natural areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June - July
Rosa gymnocarpabaldhip rose, wood rose
Distribution: Occurring west of and on the east slope of the Cascades in Washington; British Columbia to California, and in the mountains of Idaho and eastern Oregon.
Habitat: Moist or dry woods, sea level to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Rosa micranthasmall-flowered sweetbrier
Origin: Introduced from Asia
Rosa multiflorarambler rose
Distribution: British Columbia to California; throughout central and eastern North America. Native to eastern Asia.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, roadside plantings, riparian zones.
Origin: Introduced from Europe
Flowers: April-June
Rosa nutkana
Distribution: Widely distributed throughout Washington; Alaska south to California, and in the mountains in Colorado and Utah.
Habitat: Open or wooded areas, low to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
ssp. macdougalii – bristly Nootka rose
ssp. nutkana – Nootka rose
Rosa pisocarpaclustered rose, peafruit rose
Distribution: Occurring west of the Cascades crest in Washington; southern British Columbia to California.
Habitat: Thickets, stream banks, and swampy places at lower elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Rosa rugosarugosa rose
Distribution: Known from a few scattered locations in lowland western Washington; Alaska and Washington in western North America; in the north-central and northeastern areas of North America.
Habitat: Edge of saltwater beaches, roadsides, forest edge, fields, and other disturbed areas.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June-August
Rosa woodsii
Distribution: Occurring east of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to the central U.S. and eastern Canada.
Habitat: Valleys and hillsides at low elevations to forest openings at mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
var. ultramontana – pearhip rose
Rubus arcticus
Distribution: Alaska to Newfoundland, south to Vancouver Island and southern British Columbia, and in the Rocky Mountains to Colorado.
Habitat: Tundra to high mountain meadows, bogs and woods.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
ssp. acaulis – nagoonberry
Rubus bifronsEuropean blackberry, Himalayan blackberry
Distribution: British Columbia south to California and eastward throughout the intermountain west; sporadically in central and eastern North America.
Habitat: Disturbed areas, riparian zones, and forest edges at low elevations.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May-July
Rubus chamaemoruscloudberry
Origin: Native
Rubus hispidusbristly dewberry, swamp dewberry
Origin: Introduced
Rubus idaeus
Distribution: Alaska east to Newfoundland, south to California and North Carolina.
Habitat: Stream banks and open, moist or dry woods to rocky slopes in the mountains, often on talus.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
ssp. strigosus – grayleaf red raspberry
Rubus laciniatuscut-leaf blackberry, evergreen blackberry
Distribution: Introduced chiefly west of the Cascades, British Columbia to California; occasionally east to Idaho
Habitat: Roadsides and disturbed areas, mostly at low elevations
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: June - Early August
Rubus lasiococcusroughfruit berry, dwarf bramble, hairy-fruit smooth dewberry
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest and in the Olympic Mountains in Washington; British Columbia south to California.
Habitat: Moist to dry woods, lowlands to subalpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Rubus leucodermisblackcap raspberry, dark raspberry, whitebark raspberry
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to southern California, east to the Rocky Mountains.
Habitat: Fields and open to wooded hillsides, from low to moderate elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-July
Rubus nigerrimusdark raspberry, northwest raspberry
Distribution: Along the Snake River in Whitman County, Washington.
Habitat: Moist hillsides, usually along streams.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - June
Rubus nivalissnow dwarf bramble, snow dewberry
Distribution: British Columbia south to southwest Oregon, in the Cascade, Olympic and coastal mountains.
Habitat: Open to deeply shaded, usually moist areas in the mountains at moderate to mid-elevations.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - July
Rubus odoratuspurple flowering raspberry
Origin: Introduced
Rubus parviflorusthimbleberry
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to the Dakotas and New Mexico
Habitat: Open to wooded, moist to dry areas, from sea level to subalpine mountain slopes
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - July
Rubus pedatusstrawberry bramble, strawberry-leaf raspberry
Distribution: Alaska to southern Oregon, east to Idaho and Montana
Habitat: Moist areas, open banks to dense forests, near sea level to timberline
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - Early July
Rubus pensilvanicusPennsylvania blackberry
Origin: Introduced
Rubus pubescensdwarf red blackberry, dwarf red blackberry raspberry, raspberry raspberry, red raspberry
Distribution: Occurring in the northeast counties in Washington; widespread throughout the northern half of North America.
Habitat: Stream banks and moist woods to clearings where moderately dry, mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May-July
Rubus spectabilissalmonberry
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to California, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Lowland moist woods and swamps to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: March-June
Rubus ulmifoliuselm-leaf blackberry
Origin: Introduced
Rubus ursinusor trailing blackberry, California, dewberry, Pacific
Distribution: Occurring chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to California, east to Idaho.
Habitat: Open to fairly dense woodlands, sea level to mid-elevations in the mountains; common in logged areas.
Origin: Native
Flowers: April-August
Rubus vestitusEuropean blackberry
Distribution: Introduced at scattered locations in the Pacific Northwest.
Habitat: Roadsides and waste ground.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: April - June
Sanguisorba menziesiiMenzies' burnet, small-head burnet
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Sanguisorba officinalisgarden burnet, great burnet
Distribution: Alaka to northwest California, chiefly along the coast, inland to Mt. Hood, Oregon, where up to 5000 feet.
Habitat: Muskeg, swamps, and bogs.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July - August
Sanguisorba stipulataCanadian burnet, Sitka burnet
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska south to Oregon, east to Idaho in the west, and Illimois to Maine, south to Alabama in the east.
Habitat: Wet places at mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: July-August
Sibbaldia procumbenscreeping-glow-wort, creeping sibbaldia
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; widely distributed throughout western North America and northeastern North America; circumboreal.
Habitat: Open, dry to moist subalpine and alpine slopes.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Sorbaria kirilowiigian false spiraea, giant false spiraea
Origin: Introduced
Sorbaria sorbifoliafalse spiraea
Origin: Introduced
Sorbus aucupariaEuropean mountain-ash
Distribution: Introduced, commonly planted species, spread by birds, near habitations.
Habitat: Often in areas where it appears to be native.
Origin: Introduced
Flowers: May - June
Sorbus hybridaSwedish service-tree
Origin: Introduced
Sorbus intermediaSwedish whitebeam
Origin: Introduced
Sorbus scopulina
Distribution: Alaska south to California, east to the Dakotas and Colorado.
Habitat: Open areas, from the foothils to sub-alpine.
Origin: Native
Flowers: May - Early July
var. cascadensis – Cascade mountain-ash
var. scopulina – Greene's mountain ash, western mountain-ash
Sorbus sitchensis
Distribution: In the mountains on both sides of the Cascades and Olympic Mountains in Washington; Alaska south to northern California, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Forest openings at mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-July
var. grayi – Sitka mountain-ash
var. sitchensis – Sitka mountain-ash
Spiraea densiflora
Distribution: Chiefly in the Cascades and Olympic Mountains of Washington; British Columbia south to California and Nevada, east to Montana and Wyoming.
Habitat: Moist forest openings and rocky slopes, mid- to high elevations in the mountains.
Flowers: June-August
var. densiflora – subalpine spiraea
var. splendens – subalpine spiraea
Spiraea douglasii
Distribution: Alaska to California, east to Idaho; more common west of the Cascades
Habitat: Swamps, lake margins and damp meadows, sea level to subalpine
Origin: Native
Flowers: June - August
var. douglasii – Douglas' spiraea
var. menziesii – Menzies' spiraea
var. roseata – western hardhack, Douglas' spiraea, rose spiraea
Spiraea ×hitchcockiiHitchcock's spiraea
Distribution: Currently only known from Pierce County in Washington; Washington south to Oregon.
Habitat: Forest openings at low to moderate elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Spiraea lucidashiny-leaf spiraea, shinyleaf spiraea
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia south to Oregon, east to Saskatchewan and Wyoming.
Habitat: Stream banks and open to wooded areas, sea level to high elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August
Spiraea ×pyramidatapyramid spiraea
Distribution: Occurring on both sides of the Cascades crest in Washington; British Columbia to south Oregon, east to Idaho and Montana.
Habitat: Somewhat dry forest openings, moderate to mid-elevations in the mountains.
Origin: Native
Flowers: June-August